Comments for the name Amanda

Comments for AMANDA:

I have been told through biblical scholars that in Hebrew/Aramaic the name AMANDA means "Gift from God."
-- rjl  6/6/2005
Amanda does not mean lovable. It means "she must be loved" in Latin. From the verb amare, to love, and in the feminine gerundive form.
-- Anonymous User  10/19/2005
That's extremely nitpicky, don't you think? In Latin it means 'to be loved', hence 'loveable.' I think 'she must be loved' is almost the same as 'loveable,' don't you?
-- Anonymous User  5/26/2007
Actually, while in English it may seem extremely nitpicky, Latin does not 'waste' verb forms (unlike English). 'She must be loved' is gerundive/future passive participle, indicating that the noun needs or deserves love. The gerundive therefore is supposed to indicate that something must be done. 'Loveable', on the other hand, does nor carry the same connotation, since it is an adjective. It indicates that the noun is able to love, that it is possible to love, but it does not indicate that it is a dire action that must be done.
-- winter seas  8/1/2009
I had always heard that it meant "worthy of love."
-- Amanda Jane  9/9/2006
As far as I know, it means "worthy of love."
-- Anonymous User  7/6/2007
Italian poet Guido Cavalcanti (1255-1300) speaks of a woman from Toulouse aptly named Amanda in his 30th composition, "Era in penser d'amor quand'i'trovai". His sonnet n° 29 is also centered on a "woman of Toulouse", but her name is not revealed.
-- Lilya  5/18/2008
The name Amanda is a gerundive form of the Latin "amare" ("to love"). The name is translated as "must be loved".
-- coffeemancer  5/24/2009
Even though Behind the Name says the name was not used in the Middle Ages, I have seen it on a history site which is taken directly from contemporary birth records of the 1200s.

So it must have been used at least ONCE in the Middle Ages.

It was most likely taken as a female form of the saint's name Amandus, and may have had religious connotations in medieval times.

For a name that is often considered pretty but commonplace, it has an interesting and apparently controversial history.
-- SandSea  1/31/2010
"Amanda" is a subjective command in Latin from verb, "amar", "to love" that means "one that should be loved". While it is a command in Latin, it is in the subjective case meaning that "Amanda" is more of a suggestion that a mandate.
-- EyeSeaHearEwe  10/1/2010
The Latin translation of Amanda is "being loved" or "requiring to be loved".
-- Anonymous User  4/24/2011
I think the problem here is that people are confusing the gerund (a noun) with the present participle (a verbal adjective), as the two forms (originally indicated by -ing and -end suffixes respectively) have coalesced in English. Amanda is not an adjectival "being loved", "loving" or "must be loved", but the act of loving or being loved.
-- thegriffon  11/25/2012

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