User comments for Ceridwen

Meaning/History
Usage
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2
I am from the Welsh valleys, and had an auntie called Ceridwen. We used to call her Auntie Cred. She was the loveliest person anyone could know. She died when I was eight years old. I was heartbroken. It would be a wonderful world if more people were like her.
cbe  10/2/2016
1
My middle name is Ceridwen (pronounced K-eridwen- there's no K in the Welsh alphabet), as a child I hated it! Most non Welsh speakers would pronounce it Seridwen and I didn't like the fact it was a witch's name in mythology. I also read on a card, years ago - Ceridwen was the goddess of fertility and the primordial mother of nature as well as being the daughter of poetic justice (although the latter isn't as bad as the former). A few years ago I found out that the meaning could be derived from Cerdd-Wen (Pure Poetry (Cerdd = Poetry; Wen = Pure or White)) and as I write poetry, and have done since I was a child) this name fits me perfectly! I guess that's where the daughter of poetic justice comes in!
Ceri_D_Wen  12/14/2015
1
I thought this name was pronounced, "Sare- I'd wen" at first, and personally I like that better, so I'd probably change it from a C to an S- Seridwen. While the original name is pretty, it's a bit sharper than I'd like. Seridwen is soft, pretty, and feminine while still maintaining an originality. It also has lovely nicknames like Ser, Sera, Sara, and Sare. While I agree the name has character and is pretty enough as it is, changing the first consonant makes it so much better.
― Anonymous User  9/29/2015
1
Ceridwen is the name of one of the murder victims in Ethel Lina White's novel Some Must Watch (filmed as The Spiral Staircase, which does not have any character so named).
Kosta  3/30/2015
1
Ceridwen is character in the novel 'How Green Was My Valley' (1939) by Richard Llewellyn.
― Anonymous User  5/23/2013
2
Does anyone want to tell me what exactly this pop culture inference the above anonymous user was talking about is? I don't think I've ever known anyone named Ceridwen - certainly no one in the media. That could be because I'm not from the UK, but I'm not sure. All I know is that I like this name and the only use of it I've ever heard of was the mythical figure. Also, way to blow a temper tantrum over a name, anon. :/
terror_candy  1/9/2013
1
She is also the goddess of witchcraft.
― Anonymous User  5/26/2011
1
I love the name. My name Kerrie comes from the variation Keridwen or Kerridwen. It's lovely.
― Anonymous User  5/22/2011
1
I forget how I stumbled upon this name, but as soon as I did, I instantly fell in love. I don't find it trendy or anything ridiculous like that. And I don't believe certain names are for certain people with specific backgrounds. There is such a thing as name evolution.

That being said, I hate it when people pronounce it sir-rid-wen. It is obviously with a hard 'c' and to think otherwise is to butcher a beautiful name. Okay, butcher might be a bit strong, but I just think this is a beautiful name.
Book_Reader22  3/19/2011
1
Hehehe. Speaking of Welsh names and pop stars, is there a celebrity baby named "Ceridwen"?

Anyway, I heard this name from a baby names book and I really like it. The meaning is just so beautiful. I would love to name my daughter "Ceridwen." And no, I'm not Welsh.
pusherwoman  5/24/2009
1
The book "Lost Magic" by Berthe Amoss has a heroine named Ceridwen.
Martha Gold  4/13/2009
2
LOL, I'm not Welsh and I happen to love this name! Among lots of other Welsh names. ^_^ I just like the sounds of it.
CanadianChibi  12/7/2008
-1
The only people who seem to like this name are Welsh people themselves. I, personally loathe it. It means "poetic" or whatever, but it sounds utterly horrid. Is it a feminine or masculine name? I can't even seem to decipher THAT.
GunsnRoses8794  11/26/2008
1
Being of Welsh descent, I love this name! It's classy and sophisticated, and not tacky at all. At first, I had some trouble pronouncing it, but that didn't stop me from liking it. If I lived in Wales, I may name my daughter this, but I am not sure.
― Anonymous User  9/3/2008
0
This is really starting to grow on me. But I just read all these comments - I must be completely clueless, but I've never heard this outside BTN. It's popular?
― Anonymous User  3/10/2008
2
I happen to really love this name, not because of celebs or pop culture, of both I have a deep loathing. I love this name because it's interesting, beautiful, unique and VERY feminine. This is a name that can't be thrown into the 'unisex' craze *UHHGG*. And I love it for that too! Will I name a daughter this? I'm not sure. But I certainly won't discourage it's use because of 'trendy' airheads using this 'genre' -if you will- of names (I don't think they would use this particular name anyway), though any name in particular that becomes trendy and 'poppy' won't be used by me if I can help it. But a natural progression of popularity would be great! Let all who are of Welsh decent stand up with pride and take back our heritage by naming our children names of our people with no apologies to anyone for being 'different'! Many people of Welsh decent have hidden their 'ethnic' names in closets because Welsh names are considered 'odd' sounding, or strangely spelled by many. Well to heck with popular culture and their preconceptions of what is 'proper' and what is worthy! :)
ASLBankes  2/11/2008
2
It saddens me that someone posted on here that they think all of us are just pop culture zombies. Someone said that we only like this name because it's endorsed by a sexy origin, and they don't even know us. Either this person is completely pathetic, or the world is meaner and more stereotyping than I thought about such a beautiful name. I just wanted to make this comment to show how sometimes, even if it was a year ago they commented, people think they have a right to believe that anyone who doesn't have the same opinion as them are shallow and not as unique and intelligent as they think they are.
joli_dans_titre1  1/25/2008
1
Oh, come on. Admit it, you guys. That person who says we can't like a Welsh name unless we're influenced by celebrities is SO right. I mean, why else would I like this name? It can't be because of my Welsh background, or because of my personal likings. Nope, that's impossible. -end sarcasm-

I happen to like this name, and it's not because of celebrity influences. I'm quite peeved that someone actually generalized that anyone who is young on this site only likes names brought up by surges in popularity and celebrity influences.
dreadfulxsorry  8/18/2007
1
I think this name is nice, but there was a witch in the Welsh children series "Rala Rwdins", which has permanently put me off.
DontDissMadison  5/2/2007
-2
This is an ugly name, both in how it looks and sounds. I think the only reason people are saying they like it is because it's seen as cool and trendy to be into Welsh/Celtic names.
― Anonymous User  11/25/2006
2
Oh yeah? Well I like Ceridwen because I am Welsh. And proud of it. It's also a beautiful name and I love poetry. It's got nothing to do with pop culture. Celebrities are naming their daughters Ava, doesn't mean I like it! In fact if Ceridwen became no. 1 like Emily or Emma then I wouldn't use it.
― Anonymous User  4/16/2007
2
Le gasp! Other people think differently than you! That is why we like Ceridwen. Names are very personal for most people, why would someone pretend to like a name just to be "cool in the baby naming world". Well, sorry, but that does not gain cool points for you in anyone's eyes.
Ursa_Minor  2/17/2007
3
You profess to read minds "above poster"? Ceridwen has a lovely sound and lovely meaning. Having a Welsh grandmother has instilled a great love of Welsh (and many other Celtic) names in me. "Trendy" can go take a long walk off a short pier sunshine.
― Anonymous User  2/3/2007
1
Oh, come off it, you lot would call your babies 'Froufrou' if years of snappy promotion and celebrity-endorsement had convinced you it was trés chic and highly cultured to do so.

Next you'll be claiming the name Jayden has risen to staggering popularity because a multitude of 'individuals' all happened to decide they liked it at once. No fashion influence whatsoever. XD

If a promotion of all things 'Celtic' as being 'cool' in modern pop culture isn't behind the resurgence of interest in Celtic names, one has to wonder why old fashioned Germanic names like Athelwyn or Astrid, or Slavic names like Morana, aren't also enjoying a similar renaissance and being lauded so strenuously by the youngsters on this site?
― Anonymous User  3/9/2007
2
An alternate (and, I think, preferable) pronunciation is "KE-rid-wen".
electrainstead  7/3/2006
1
Absolutely beautiful.
bschoer10  4/7/2006
2
My mum's name is Ceridwen, but she gets everyone to call here 'Ceri' - like Kerry.
x_bondo_x  3/1/2006
1
At first I thought it was "Ser-idwen". Ke-RID-wen will take some getting used to, but all in all I think this is a beautiful name.
― Anonymous User  1/23/2006
2
In Welsh mythology, Ceridwen was a magician, mother of Taliesin, Morfran, and a beautiful daughter.

Morfran (also called Avagddu) was hideously ugly, so she sought to make him wise. Ceridwen had a magical cauldron that could make a potion granting wisdom. The mixture had to be cooked for a year and a day. Morda, a blind man, tended the fire beneath the cauldron, while Gwion, a young boy, stirred the concoction.

The first three drops of liquid from this cauldron gave wisdom; the rest was a fatal poison. Three hot drops spilled onto Gwion's hand as he stirred, burning him. He instinctively put his hand in his mouth, and instantly gained great wisdom and knowledge.

Ceridwen chased Gwion. He turned himself into a rabbit. She became a dog. He became a fish and jumped into a river. She turned into an otter. He turned into a bird; she became a hawk. Finally, he turned into a single grain of corn. She then became a hen and ate him.

When Ceridwen became pregnant, she knew it was Gwion and resolved to kill the child when he was born. However, when he was born, he was so beautiful that she couldn't do it. She threw him in the ocean instead. The child did not die, but swam away and became the legendary bard, Taliesin.
― Anonymous User  10/30/2005
2
I first thought this was pronounced "cer-ID-wen".
echo_of_the_past  9/27/2005

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