Cleisthenes
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Cleisthenes was not merely a "statesman"--he pretty much founded democracy in Athens. [noted -ed]
-- erb816  11/21/2010
It seems to me that the main latinized form of Kleisthenes is actually Clisthenes, because I have observed that -ei- in ancient Greek names usually becomes latinized to -i-. Cleisthenes should then be a variant latinization... or a variant form of Clisthenes, if you will. Wikipedia appears to support the notion of Clisthenes being the actual proper latinized form, if the Latin article for Cleisthenes can serve as any indication:

- https://la.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clisthenes_Atheniensis (in Latin)

Clisthenes being the main latinization also makes sense for how the forms of Kleisthenes came to be in the other latinate (i.e. Romance) languages, such as Catalan, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese. In these languages, Kleisthenes is encountered as: Clistene (Italian) and Clístenes (Catalan, Spanish and Portuguese).

Furthermore, the names in the main database also support that -ei- in Greek usually becomes -i- in Latin. Some examples of this are:

- Alkeides becomes Alcides in Latin;
- Aristeides becomes Aristides in Latin;
- Eirene becomes Irene in Latin;
- Eukleides becomes Euclides in Latin (which subsequently led to the English form Euclid);
- Herakleios becomes Heraclius in Latin;
- Thaleia becomes Thalia in Latin.

The only real exceptions to this in the main database are Cleisthenes (which should be Clisthenes), Cleitus (which should be Clitus) and Heracleitus (which should be Heraclitus).

There are even more examples of this in the "Greek Mythology" category in the "Namesakes" section, such as:

- Cheirimachos becomes Chirimachus in Latin;
- Cheiron becomes Chiron in Latin;
- Kameiros becomes Camirus in Latin;
- Kapheira becomes Caphira in Latin;
- Kleitos becomes Clitus in Latin;
- Leiokritos becomes Liocritus in Latin;
- Peisandros becomes Pisander in Latin;
- Peisistratos becomes Pisistratus in Latin.

There are of course also examples in the Submitted Names Database, but I will refrain from listing those, as then this comment will become too long. X_x But suffice it to say that I personally think that Kleisthenes ---> Clisthenes (variant Cleisthenes) is something worth looking into. :-)
-- Lucille  11/22/2016

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