Comments for the name Diego

Comments for DIEGO:

Could it be the Spanish form of Jacob, as I saw on a site about surnames that Michael Jackson was translated as Miguel Diaz and Diaz is "son of Diego".
-- menke  8/2/2005
Diego is the Spanish form of David.
-- Lady_Raltz  8/9/2005
I thought it was the Spanish form of James. Saw on another site that it was James. Looking at the 'related names' section it makes more sense than David. Can seen where you are coming from though. I could be right, then again I could be wrong.
-- Anonymous User  10/31/2005
Diego is not Spanish for David. David in Spanish is simply David just pronounced DAA VEED instead of DAVE ID. Diego is from the name James.
-- Today1  8/18/2006
Didacus was named that AFTER his death and beatification. Didacus was never a name before a Latin name was invented for him. Didacus doesn't exist in any other Romance name.

Here is how the Latin name for St. James became Diego in Spanish or Tiago in Portuguese.
Sanctus Jacobus
Santo Iago (K-sound often became a G-sound)
Santiago.
THEN we lose the SAN because in modern Spanish the title Saint for males became San (see San Francisco, San Antonio)
Tiago (still a name in Portuguese)
Diago
Diego, Diego.

Please let's kill this Didacus myth.
-- arthurianlegend  7/24/2007
Diego (new Spanish) is from the name Tiago (old Spanish). The San from Santiago just means saint and Diego is the Spanish for James.
-- Anonymous User  11/8/2007
Spanish: from the personal name Diego, which is of uncertain derivation. It was early taken to be a reduced form of Santiago, and is commonly taken by English speakers as being a form of James, but this is no more than folk etymology. It is found in the Middle Ages in the Latin forms Didacus and Didagus, which Meyer-Lübke derived from Greek didakhe ‘doctrine’, ‘teaching’, but in view of the fact that it is unknown outside the Iberian Peninsula it may possibly have a pre-Roman origin.
-- ce1estia1  6/28/2008
Santiago, being obvious derivation to Diego, itself derives from Sant Jago. Jago then morphed to James in English. So though not necessarily stemming directly from James, the relationship is much stronger than your far flung Greek theory. Reminds me of the father in My Big Fat Greek Wedding. Please update. This is my son's name and I love it.
-- Anonymous User  10/3/2009

Add a Comment

Key: Meaning/History Usage Pronunciation Famous Bearer Personal Impression Other

Comments are left by users of this website. They are not checked for accuracy.