Comments for the name Digby

Filter:

Comments for DIGBY:

I love the name Digby. At first hearing it seemed weird. Almost as if it is a nickname. But after knowing a Digby and hearing the name often it gives a classy, boisterous and sweet impression of the bearer. It also carries well through childhood and into becomming and adult. It is simple and yet not common which is rare! Thumbs up for Digby!
-- CLAUDIA 20  3/26/2007
Awful. I don't like anything with ''dig'' in it.
-- slight night shiver  5/21/2008
Good name for a mole or gopher.
-- number1212  12/17/2008
The reason that this surname is still in use as a first name is almost certainly due to the notability of the aristocratic Digby family. The most famous member was Sir Kenelm Digby (1603-1665), an eccentric intellectual, Catholic apologist, diplomat and natural philosopher.

Edward Henry Kenelm Digby (b. 1924) is the current Baron Digby.
-- SandSea  2/5/2010
Comedienne Cal Wilson and her husband Chris Woods named their first baby Digby James Phillip Woods (born 15th May 2009).
-- SandSea  2/5/2010
Unusual and incredibly cute name for a boy. I might be biased because the few guys I know called Digby are all incredibly handsome, smart and nice people. There's something very lovable about the name Digby, and yet it has dignity and substance as well.
-- SandSea  2/5/2010
Trevor Charles Digby Kincaid, (18 Dec. - Peterborough, Ontario, Canada) 1872-1970, professor of zoology at the University of Washington and instrumental in establishing the Puget Sound Biological Station (a forerunner of the Friday Harbor Laboratory) in 1904.

In 1899 the UW established individual departments for zoology and botany, and Kincaid joined the faculty as a professor of zoology.

Over the years, Kincaid discovered many new species and played a key role in the development of local natural resources. A history of the UW zoology department prepared by Melville Hatch in 1936 lists some 47 plants and animals named after Kincaid.

Insects were Kincaid's early passion. "He served with such success as entomologist on the Harriman Alaska Expedition in 1899 that he was selected in 1908 and 1909 by L. O. Howard, chief of the Bureau of Entomology, to make trips to Japan and southwestern Russia for parasites of the gipsy-moth," writes Hatch. "The chalcid fly, Schedius kuvanae Howard, which was introduced from Japan as a result of Kincaid's investigation, has proven one of the most valuable parasitic enemies of the gipsy-moth so far established in America," he records.

The minutes of the Young Naturalists' Society of July 26, 1894, written by Society secretary Edmond S. Meany, record some of Kincaid's contributions:

He had discovered many new species including. One new species of Roncus and Ideoroncus (Pseudoscorpions). No representative of these genera has been found in America though they have been found in Chile. He found fifteen new species of Phalangidea (daddy-long-legs). One new genus was found and twelve new species of Thysanura including Japyx. Mr. Kincaid's species is the third. Ever found in North America. The genus Japyx is distributed all over the world, but there are but twelve or fifteen species known. He had also found a number of new species of Tenthridinidae (saw flies). Another interesting species was a parasite that clings to the abdomen of a spider. It is named Zaglyptus Kincaidii in honor of Mr. Kincaid. A number of other new species had been named in his honor, showing a great amount of original work.

After about 1911, Kincaid became interested in fresh-water plankton and oyster culture. In 1925, he began experimenting with the Japanese oyster. Kincaid "practically established the Japanese oyster industry at Willapa Harbor," notes Hatch.

He also happens to be my great-grandfather, from whom my second middle name comes. GO DIGBY!
-- The_Will_Factor  6/29/2010

Add a Comment

Key: Meaning/History Usage Pronunciation Famous Bearer Personal Impression Other

Comments are left by users of this website. They are not checked for accuracy.