Comments for the name Doris

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Comments for DORIS:

My grandmother's name, but too old-fashioned for me.
-- Anonymous User  9/3/2005
A famous bearer is actress/singer Doris Day (born Doris Mary Ann von Kappelhoff on April 3, 1924.) She was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in 1959 for "Pillow Talk".
-- AndrewJKD  11/5/2005
I think Doris is very nice.
-- Anonymous User  5/27/2006
It's strange how this once-popular name is now extremely rare. Maybe it will come back someday. I think it has a nice sound to it.
-- gigibee  7/19/2006
I always thought that Doris meant the "same as Gold." D'or meaning gold, -is being the ending that means the same as or similar.
-- JMichael  10/20/2006
Even if it was popular once, it was never an elegant name.
-- lia-roxana  12/29/2006
In British rhyming slang, Doris is a mild insult on a par with 'pansy' (from Doris Day meaning gay).
-- Anonymous User  4/8/2007
This name is unique but it's still not very pretty.
-- CharlieRob  5/9/2007
This was the name of the evil robotic hat in the movie Meet the Robinsons.
-- Anonymous User  6/6/2007
Also used in Slovenia. (feminine)
-- earthnut  7/20/2007
I'm pretty sure Doris was a sea nymph, not a goddess. [noted -ed]
-- Swallowtail  9/27/2007
Sounds like an old lady to me. Not a very nice name for a child!
-- CharlieRob  10/1/2007
I agree. It's in the same category as Ethel, Eunice, Bertha, and grandad names like Bertram and Wilfred.
-- freeserve.co.uk  10/21/2007
Doris is a lovely, timeless name, not so far off from Doreen or Dora, for those of you who think it too old-fashioned. I like that Doris is a short, no-frills name, and I wouldn't hesitate to bestow it on a daughter. The name given should be one that will be suitable for her entire life, and this is a good choice, and for a young person these days, it's unique without being just silly, as some of the newly thought-up names tend to be.
-- Anonymous User  1/6/2008
A famous bearer is American actress Doris Roberts (born November 4, 1925 or 1930). She is well-known for her role as Marie Barone on the sitcom 'Everybody Loves Raymond', winning 4 Emmy Awards for Outstanding Supporting Actress. She is also well-known for roles on TV series 'St. Elsewhere', 'Perfect Strangers', and 'Remington Steele'.
-- AndrewJKD  4/7/2008
Apart from maybe Iris, Beatrice, and Bellatrix, I don't usually like names that end in the 's' sound, and this name is admittedly old-fashioned, but I do think the name is pretty. On the other hand, it sounds very girly to me, and by ''girly'', I don't mean ''like the name of a little girl or a teenager'', but rather an ultra-feminine name. Not that there's anything wrong with being feminine, but the image that comes to mind is a woman who always wears dresses and has curly hair and a pretty face, and who only takes interest in traditionally feminine activities. It sounds like the name of a woman who embodies the sexist idea of the ideal woman of the 1950s, quite frankly, and is desperately in need of reclaiming. Maybe this will be popular with more progressive generations one day. Sometimes names are ''resurrected'' like that.
-- slight night shiver  5/21/2008
I like the name Doris, people call it old-fashioned, but I have a 12 year old cousin called Doris.
-- SuicuneGem  6/8/2008
In the Netherlands Doris is more a boys name than the name of a girl.
-- Kaat5  8/23/2008
"Doris" was Jamie Lee Curtis's character's code name in the movie "True Lies" (Arnold Schwarzenegger's code name was "Boris").
-- erb816  8/21/2009
Doris Eaton Travis (1904-2010) was an actress, Broadway performer, and Ziegfield girl.
-- bananarama  5/18/2010
Doris is the Greek goddess of the sea's bounty.
-- tessareea1  7/1/2010
This name is so old.
-- Anonymous User  11/5/2010
I have a soft spot for this name because it's the name of my late great-aunt. She was such a sweet woman. I think this name is a lot better then all of the modern names today. And I love the meaning.
-- Chrila96  12/29/2010
Also used in Croatia. [noted -ed]
-- Sofia  1/4/2011
In Rome there's a tombstone plaque in Latin from Ancient Rome memorialising a seven-year-old girl called Doris who died in a fire.
I didn't realise before that the name was used in Ancient Rome (maybe she was of Greek heritage).
I think Doris is rather a nice name and would like to see it make a comeback.
Old ladies were little girls once!
-- Anonymous User  4/25/2012
Ultimately comes from Doros, legendary ancestor of the Dorians, whose name is related to doro/δώρο (gift).
-- arrowhead909  4/30/2012
The name Doris is still in use, though rare. It was given to 100 baby girls born in the US in 2012.
-- Oohvintage  7/17/2013
Your Greek translation and spelling of DORIS is wrong in that 2 letters are wrong. I am a graduate in Classic Languages specialising in both Latin and Ancient Greek the modern Greek letters vary only slightly however this does not excuse the error. In ancient Greek the letter "O" has two sounds a hard short "o" as in "Bottle" represented by the letter omicron which is an "o" same as English it is the letter following the sequence MEW NEW XEE before PYE ROE SIGMA you spelled Doris with an omega this is the long soft as in "Bow" sounding variant of the letter "o" it is the last letter of the ancient Greek Alphabet and is similar to a lower case "w" in English. Finally the final letter of Doris is sigma this letter you have used is neither of the formal styles for sigma in Ancient Greek if an "s" is required in a word anywhere other than the last letter it is similar to an "0" but with a little tail on the top right hand side of the "o" like an upside down "Q" if a sigma is the last letter it is virtually same as the English "s" the only subtle difference is that the bottom tail is longer than a standard "s" and drops beneath the normal letter line.
[Ancient Greek Doris is spelled with omega -ed]
-- iain not ian 1958  1/20/2014

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