Comments for the name Hagar

Filter:

Comments for HAGAR:

Ha'Gar, in Hebrew, literally means "the stranger." In the story, Hagar is the Egyptian wife of Abraham, and thus literally a stranger to his people.
-- She-Ra  12/10/2004
"Hagar the Horrible" is a comic strip about a viking. In this case the name is used for a male.
-- breakofday  12/22/2005
Hagar is the name of Milkman's lover/cousin in the Toni Morrison novel "Song of Solomon."
-- Eilicea  5/5/2007
This sounds like a good name for a big dog.
-- number1212  11/8/2008
Hagar Shipley is the main character in Margaret Laurence's novel "The Stone Angel."
-- maniac  4/6/2009
The origin is Arabic and it literally means "stone."

In the Bible, contrary to popular belief, when Jesus says "The STONE you have cast away has become the chief cornerSTONE" he was talking about hajar (English: Hagar) and how her and her son were cast away, but that a great nation would be called out of her seed (Ishmael) and that through him would dawn a nation chosen by God since the Hebrews were so rebellious according to the Bible.

Likewise, at the ka'bah, a holy place for the Muslims, there is a stone there called "HAJAR AL-ASWAD" this literally means "stone the black" or properly translated into English "the black stone" - it is properly pronounced with a "J" as in "Justin" not the English form that is spelled with a "G" sounding like the "G" in Good. There are should b a short rolled "R" as if speaking Spanish, both "A's" in the name have a short vowel sound - so it's not "HAY-GAR" like pronounced in English, it is "hajar".
-- Anonymous User  4/18/2009
I can NOT picture a girl with this name! It sounds so masculine and foreign.
-- Anonymous User  5/13/2009
It should be noted, in reference to the two previous comments on the history this name, that while this name does have different meanings in different languages that Jesus did not speak Arabic nor did the people he was speaking to so it would not hold the same meaning to any of them. In short it is nonsensical and inappropriate to apply a historical meaning to a name that has no relevance to the historical or linguistic context in which it was used. This name as with any other should be used in the context that is appropriate for the user; but the history should be truthful and objective, neither based on popular or personal belief.
-- Anonymous User  5/8/2011
This name is so amazing I named my daughter this after my first daughter.
-- Anonymous User  8/28/2013
The Turkish form of this name is Hacer. [noted -ed]
-- Shibbeh  10/6/2014

Add a Comment

Key: Meaning/History Usage Pronunciation Famous Bearer Personal Impression Other

Comments are left by users of this website. They are not checked for accuracy.