Comments for the name Steven

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Comments for STEVEN:

Steven Morrissey, lead singer of English indie band the Smiths (disbanded in 1987) and solo artist; goes by "Morrissey".
-- whackedtollie  11/24/2005
Steven is derived from the Greek name "Stephanio" meaning "crowned one" referring to a temporary crown, not a "diadem" or an "eternal crown".
-- Arowen Half-Elven  12/19/2005
The name originated in Scotland. The meaning of the word was "King of kings." A possible reason why royalty was named Steven.
-- Anonymous User  1/10/2006
Steven Bays is the lead singer of the band Hot Hot Heat.
-- dani_08  3/5/2006
Steven Tyler of Aerosmith.
-- skatergirl2  5/21/2006
I like this name a lot - mostly because it's my first name. It is not so unusual that it gets butchered all the time (like my last name) and yet there are not too many other Stevens that I know. It can sound very formal or be shortened to "Steve" for a more relaxed sound.
-- Anonymous User  6/15/2006
Famous bearer: Steven George Gerrard (born 30 May 1980), England and Liverpool midfield football player, hotly tipped to become England captain following the retirement of David Beckham.
-- reservoirdoll1987  7/11/2006
I know too many guys with this name. It isn't a bad name and I do prefer this spelling the best. For me it is overused. I have also seen the spelling Stevin.
-- Anonymous User  7/24/2006
Steven Gerrard is England's center midfielder and captain of Liverpool.
-- Master_Kirby  7/25/2006
Steven Curtis Chapman is a Christian music artist.
-- Anonymous User  11/11/2006
There is an author named Steven Martini.
-- Anonymous User  11/28/2006
Steven Stone is the Champion in the Pokémon Ruby and Pokémon Sapphire video games.
-- VIT  7/25/2007
Steven was most popular about 50 years ago which makes it very out of style right now and boring. I prefer the Stephen spelling because it is more classic.
-- Anonymous User  8/21/2007
There is something about the sound of this name I have never liked. I think it is the long e sound. At any rate, I associate this name with a nerdy guy because I have known two Stevens who were very geeky and one who was borderline geeky. I know not all Stevens are geeky, it is just an association I can't help making. If one must use this name, I prefer the spelling Stephen.
-- queenv  10/6/2007
I like this name, and I don't like it when people spell it with a PH instead of a V. It just looks better with a V. Anyhow, I think this name is strong-sounding, and it could do with or without the nickname of Steve.
-- Penneyperson  10/20/2007
Steven Paul Smith was the birth name of musician Elliott Smith.
-- scholasticastewart  1/7/2008
This name is okay. I've only met one Steven and he was a very energictic kid. That's the connection I make when I hear it; a earnest boy who wants to please. I think it ages well, unlike some names like Chip.
-- cebca  2/15/2008
Based on the amount of people who've rated this name I can only assume that many who frequent this site are either named Steven, married to a Steven, or have a relative named Steven. It's a nice name and one that I think will make a comeback eventually.
-- Fionafabulous  3/22/2008
In the New Testament, in the book of Acts, the congregation agreed to choose men who were wise, of good reputation and full of the Holy Spirit to serve. The first one chosen for the job was a man named Steven, who the bible describes as a man full of faith, grace, power and the Holy Spirit. He performed great wonders and signs among the people. Noted in chapter 6 of the book of Acts. He is also known as the first martyr of Christianity (Acts 7:54-60).
-- smaraya63  7/19/2008
Steven Hyde, the nonconformist stoner on That '70s Show.
-- sea7968  10/9/2008
I know only one Steven, my cousin. The name fits him so well. It's perfectly masculine, strong, and handsome. However, I'm not to fond of the spelling Stephen, for some reason.
-- Anonymous User  10/14/2008
It's an anagram of events.
-- Hushpuppy  12/19/2008
Not too common, which is nice.
-- _0TophasNails_1  12/22/2008
It's a nice name, but too common, and for me immediately brings to mind the hideous singer Steven Tyler.
-- bananarama  1/8/2009
I like this name, it's very laid back and soft to pronounce.
-- _0TophasNails_1  1/26/2009
I've actually never met anyone with this name; everyone I know is a Stephen. I like Steven better.
-- SamBelden  11/4/2011
This name is also used in The Netherlands (and has been well before 1880), where it is an independent Dutch variant form of Stephanus - meaning, it is not an imported English name here. Although I am sure many people do think that it is an imported English name, because the name was rare before World War II. It was only after World War II (due to increased influence of English-speaking countries on Dutch mainstream culture) that the name began to get more exposure, especially since the mid-'60s. The name was at its most popular during 1980 and 1994 (with 342 births in 1991 being the highest number), after which the name slowly began to decline in popularity. There were only 57 little Stevens born in 2011.

A good example of the name being an old and independent Dutch name can be found in the name of the Dutch village Stevensweert, which literally means "Steven's weerd". Weerd is an archaic Dutch term for a flat area of land that is completely surrounded by rivers and lakes, which is the case with the village Stevensweert. The village's parish is said to have existed for 800 years already (since the 13th century, during which time the village's name was also spelled Steffesweert, Steffeswert, Stevensweerd, etc.), so there you have proof that the name Steven has been around in The Netherlands for quite a while already.

Finally, the Dutch pronunciation of Steven is: STAY-vən. [noted -ed]
-- Lucille  1/12/2013
It's such a great name. Strong and suitable for all ages, and a name that is certainly never going to go to the girls. I have a feeling Steven will return to the top 100 in a few years.
-- Oohvintage  8/7/2013
Steven Taylor was a companion of the First Doctor (Doctor Who).
-- VoraLundar  6/17/2014
In Roman Britannia the name originated as "Stephaenus". When The Empire laid in shambles the Danish (Angles) & Saxons invaded. They beared with them two pronunciations for all thing relating to the letter F one is "eff" and the other "fee" said like "vee". "PH" was noted as two letter/one character. Lead "PH" was said like "Fee" whilst in flow "ph" was said like "vee". The letter "V" a Waw in the Roman dominated world was used much like a "W" or a "U". As Britannia was oriented with Celts, Vikings, & Latins and so on two names came from the Old "Stephaenus". Stephan and some time later also spelled Stephen. The PHI was voiced thus the "Vee" was born. This pronunciation was then in transition to the character "V" altering the Roman Waw. The spelling "Stephen" became more popular in Medieval England usage than "Stephan". The Renaissance period brought the Great Vowel Shift and hence the phonetic spelling "STEVEN" was made.
-- Stephen1976  7/15/2014

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