Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the usage is English; and the name appears on the England and Wales popularity list ranked < 100 for years > 2000; and the name does not appear on the United States popularity list ranked < 200 for years > 1930.
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ABBIE   f   English
Diminutive of ABIGAIL.
ALFIE   m   English
Diminutive of ALFRED.
ARLO   m   English
Meaning uncertain. It was perhaps inspired by the fictional place name Arlo Hill from the poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590) by Edmund Spenser. Spenser probably got Arlo by altering the real Irish place name Aherlow, which is Gaelic meaning "between two highlands".
CONOR   m   Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Conchobhar which means "dog lover" or "wolf lover". It has been in use in Ireland for centuries and was the name of several Irish kings. It was also borne by the legendary Ulster king Conchobar mac Nessa, known for his tragic desire for Deirdre.
DARCEY   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of DARCY.
DARCY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Norman French d'Arcy, originally denoting one who came from Arcy in France. This was the surname of a character in Jane Austen's novel 'Pride and Prejudice' (1813).
DEXTER   m   English
From an occupational surname meaning "one who dyes" in Old English. It also coincides with the Latin word dexter meaning "right-handed, skilled".
ELLE   f   English (Modern)
Diminutive of ELEANOR and other names beginning with El. This name can also be given in reference to the French pronoun elle meaning "she".
ELLIS (1)   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the given name ELIJAH.
ESME   m & f   English
Variant of ESMÉ.
ESMÉ   m & f   English, Dutch
Means "esteemed" or "loved" in Old French. It was first recorded in Scotland, being borne by the first Duke of Lennox in the 16th century.
EVE   f   English, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חוה (chawah) "to breathe" or the related word חיה (chayah) "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.... [more]
EVIE   f   English
Diminutive of EVE or EVELYN.
FELICITY   f   English
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century. It can sometimes be used as an English form of the Latin name FELICITAS. This name was revived in the late 1990s after the appearance of the television series 'Felicity'.
FELIX   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.... [more]
FINLAY   m   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
FRANKIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of FRANK (1) or FRANCES.
FREYA   f   Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern), German
From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This was the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm of Fólkvangr. Along with her brother Freyr and father Njord, she was one of the Vanir (as opposed to the Æsir). Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.... [more]
GEMMA   f   Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
GEORGINA   f   English, Dutch, German, Spanish
Feminine form of GEORGE.
HARLEY   m & f   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HOLLIE   f   English
Variant of HOLLY.
HUGO   m   Spanish, Portuguese, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
IMOGEN   f   English (British)
The name of a princess in the play 'Cymbeline' (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden".
JASPER   m   English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Means "treasurer" in Persian. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
JODIE   f   English
Feminine variant of JODY.
JOSH   m   English
Short form of JOSHUA.
KAYLEIGH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of KAYLEE. This is also a common Anglicized form of the Gaelic word ceilidh, a traditional social gathering and dance.
KIAN (2)   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CIAN.
LARA (1)   f   Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Russian short form of LARISA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel 'Doctor Zhivago' (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965).
LEXI   f   English
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA or ALEXIS.
LEXIE   f   English
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA.
LIBBY   f   English
Originally a medieval diminutive of Ibb, itself a diminutive of ISABEL. It is also used as a diminutive of ELIZABETH.
LOTTIE   f   English, Swedish
Diminutive of CHARLOTTE or LISELOTTE.
LOUIE   m   English
Diminutive of LOUIS.
MADDISON   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MADISON.
MADELEINE   f   French, English, Swedish
French form of MAGDALENE.
MATILDA   f   English, Swedish, Finnish
From the Germanic name Mahthildis meaning "strength in battle", from the elements maht "might, strength" and hild "battle". Saint Matilda was the wife of the 10th-century German king Henry I the Fowler. The name was common in many branches of European royalty in the Middle Ages. It was brought to England by the Normans, being borne by the wife of William the Conqueror himself. Another notable royal by this name was a 12th-century daughter of Henry I of England, known as the Empress Matilda because of her first marriage to the Holy Roman Emperor Henry V. She later invaded England, laying the foundations for the reign of her son Henry II.... [more]
MILLIE   f   English
Diminutive of MILDRED, MILLICENT and other names containing the same sound.
MOLLIE   f   English
Variant of MOLLY.
OLLIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of OLIVER, OLIVIA or OLIVE.
PHOEBE   f   English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).
POPPY   f   English (British)
From the word for the red flower, derived from Old English popæg.
REGGIE   m   English
Diminutive of REGINALD.
REUBEN   m   Biblical, Hebrew, English
Means "behold, a son" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the eldest son of Jacob and Leah and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Reuben was cursed by his father because he slept with Jacob's concubine Bilhah. It has been used as a Christian name in Britain since the Protestant Reformation.
SKYE   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.
SONNY   m   English
From a nickname which is commonly used to denote a young boy, derived from the English word son.
TEDDY   m   English
Diminutive of EDWARD or THEODORE.
THEO   m   English, Dutch
Short form of THEODORE, THEOBALD, and other names that begin with Theo.
TIA   f   English
Short form of names ending with tia. It has been suggested that its use since the 1950s is the result of the brand name for the coffee liqueur Tia Maria. In the brand name, Tia is not a given name; rather, it means "aunt" in Spanish or Portuguese.
TILLY   f   English
Diminutive of MATILDA.
YASMIN   f   Persian, Arabic, English (Modern)
From Persian یاسمن (yasamen) meaning "jasmine". In modern times it has been used in the English-speaking world, as a variant of JASMINE.
ZARA (1)   f   English (Modern)
English form of ZAÏRE. In England it came to public attention when Princess Anne gave it to her daughter in 1981. Use of the name may also be influenced by the trendy Spanish clothing retailer Zara.
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