Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the usage is English; and the name appears on the United States popularity list ranked < 150 for years > 2000; and the name does not appear on the United States popularity list for years < 1970.
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AALIYAH   f   Arabic, English (Modern)
Feminine form of AALI. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by the singer Aaliyah Haughton (1979-2001), who was known simply as Aaliyah.
ADALYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ADELINE using the popular name suffix lyn.
ADALYNN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ADELINE using the popular name suffix lyn.
AIDAN   m   Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.
AIDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AIDAN.
ALEXA   f   English, German, Hungarian
Short form of ALEXANDRA.
ALEXIA   f   French, English (Modern)
Feminine form of ALEXIS.
ARIANA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ARIANNA.
ASHLYN   f   English (Modern)
Combination of ASHLEY and the popular name suffix lyn.
AUBREE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of AUBREY.
AYDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AIDAN.
BRADEN   m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Bradáin meaning "descendant of BRADÁN".
BRAYDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of BRADEN.
BREANNA   f   English
Variant of BRIANA.
BRIANA   f   English
Feminine form of BRIAN. This name was used by Edmund Spenser in 'The Faerie Queene' (1590). The name was not commonly used until the 1970s, when it rapidly became popular in the United States.
BRIANNA   f   English
Variant of BRIANA.
BRIELLE   f   English (Modern)
Short form of GABRIELLE. This is also the name of towns in the Netherlands and New Jersey, though their names derive from a different source.
BRITTANY   f   English
From the name of the region in the northwest of France, called in French Bretagne. It was named for the Britons who settled there after the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the invasions of the Anglo-Saxons. As a given name, it first came into common use in America in the 1970s.
BRODY   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place in Moray, Scotland. It probably means "ditch, mire" in Gaelic.
BROOKLYN   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the borough of New York City, originally derived from Dutch Breukelen meaning "broken land". It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn.
BRYSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of BRICE".
CADEN   m   English (Modern)
Sometimes explained as a derivative of the Irish surname Caden, which is a reduced form of the Gaelic surname Mac Cadáin meaning "son of Cadán". In actuality, its popularity in America beginning in the 1990s is due to its sound - it shares its fashionable aden suffix sound with other popular names like Hayden, Aidan and Braden.
CAITLIN   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.
CAITLYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CAITLIN.
CAMDEN   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name perhaps meaning "enclosed valley" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English historian William Camden (1551-1623).
CASSIDY   f & m   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".
CAYDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CADEN.
COLTON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "COLA's town".
CONNER   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CONOR.
CONNOR   m   Irish, English (Modern)
Variant of CONOR.
DAKOTA   m & f   English (Modern)
Means "allies, friends" in the Dakota language. This is the name of a Native American people of the northern Mississippi valley.
DESTINY   f   English
Means simply "destiny, fate" from the English word, ultimately from Latin destinare "to determine", a derivative of stare "to stand". It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the last half of the 20th century.
EASTON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning "east town" in Old English.
EDEN   f & m   Hebrew, English (Modern)
Means "place of pleasure" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament the Garden of Eden was the place where the first people, Adam and Eve, lived before they were expelled.
GABRIELLA   f   Italian, Hungarian, English, Swedish
Feminine form of GABRIEL.
GAGE   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname of Old French origin meaning either "measure", originally denoting one who was an assayer, or "pledge", referring to a moneylender. It was popularized as a given name by a character from the book 'Pet Sematary' (1983) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1989).
GENESIS   f   English (Modern)
Means "birth, origin" in Greek. This is the name of the first book of the Old Testament in the Bible. It tells of the creation of the world, the expulsion of Adam and Eve, Noah and the great flood, and the three patriarchs.
GISELLE   f   French, English (Modern)
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage" or "pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court. It was borne by a daughter of the French king Charles III who married the Norman leader Rollo in the 10th century. The name was popular in France during the Middle Ages (the more common French form is Gisèle). Though it became known in the English-speaking world due to Adolphe Adam's ballet 'Giselle' (1841), it was not regularly used until the 20th century.
GRAYSON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname meaning "son of the steward", derived from Middle English greyve "steward".
GREYSON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of GRAYSON.
HAILEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HALEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
JADEN   m & f   English (Modern)
An invented name, using the popular aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan. This name first became common in American in the 1990s when similar-sounding names were increasing in popularity. It is sometimes considered a variant of JADON.
JASMINE   f   English, French
From the English word for the climbing plant with fragrant flowers which is used for making perfumes. It is derived from Persian یاسمن (yasamen) (which is also a Persian name).
JAXON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of JACKSON.
JAXSON   m   English (Modern)
Variant of JACKSON.
JAYCE   m   English
Short form of JASON.
JAYDEN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of JADEN.
JAYLA   f   English (Modern)
Combination of JAY (1) and the popular name suffix la.
JENNA   f   English, Finnish
Variant of JENNY. Use of the name was popularized in the 1980s by the character Jenna Wade on the television series 'Dallas'.
JILLIAN   f   English
Variant of GILLIAN.
JORDYN   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of JORDAN.
KADEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CADEN.
KAIDEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of CADEN.
KAITLYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CAITLIN.
KALEB   m   English (Modern)
English variant of CALEB.
KATELYN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CAITLIN.
KAYDEN   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of CADEN.
KAYLEE   f   English (Modern)
Combination of KAY (1) and the popular name suffix lee.
KEIRA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of KIRA (2). This spelling was popularized by British actress Keira Knightley (1985-).
KELSEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which is derived from town names in Lincolnshire. It may mean "Cenel's island", from the Old English name Cenel "fierce" in combination with eg "island".
KHLOE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CHLOE.
KIARA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of CIARA (1) or CHIARA. This name first became used in 1988 after the singing duo Kiara released their song 'This Time'. It was further popularized by a character in the animated movie 'The Lion King II' (1998).
KINGSTON   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "king's town" in Old English.
KINSLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was derived from the given name CYNESIGE.
KYLEE   f   English
Variant of KYLIE.
KYLIE   f   English
This name arose in Australia, where it is said to mean "boomerang" in an Australian Aboriginal language. It is more likely a feminine form of KYLE, and it is in this capacity that it began to be used in America in the 1970s. A famous bearer is the Australian singer Kylie Minogue (1968-).
LAYLA   f   Arabic, English
Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.
LIZBETH   f   English
Short form of ELIZABETH.
LONDON   f & m   English (Modern)
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain. As a surname it was borne by the American author Jack London (1876-1916).
MACKENZIE   f & m   English
From the Gaelic surname Mac Coinnich, which means "son of COINNEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was William Lyon MacKenzie (1795-1861), a Canadian journalist and political rebel. As a feminine given name, it was popularized by the American actress Mackenzie Phillips (1959-).
MADDOX   m   English (Modern)
From a Welsh surname meaning "son of MADOC". It was brought to public attention when the actress Angelina Jolie gave this name to her adopted son in 2002.
MAKAYLA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MICHAELA.
MARLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the Jamaican musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
MAYA (2)   f   English
Variant of MAIA (1). This name can also be given in reference to the Maya peoples, a Native American culture who built a great civilization in southern Mexico and Latin America.
MIKAYLA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MICHAELA.
MILEY   f   English (Modern)
In the case of actress and singer Miley Cyrus (1992-), it is a shortened form of the nickname Smiley, given to her by her father because she often smiled. Although it was not at all common before she brought it to public attention, there are some examples of its use before her time, most likely as a diminutive of MILES.
MYA   f   English (Modern)
Variant of MIA.
NEVAEH   f   English (Modern)
The word heaven spelled backwards. It became popular after the musician Sonny Sandoval from the rock group P.O.D. gave it to his daughter in 2000.
PAISLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a Scottish surname, originally from the name of a town, which may ultimately be derived from Latin basilica "church". This is also a word (derived from the name of that same town) for a type of pattern commonly found on fabrics.
PAYTON   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of PEYTON.
PIPER   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute). It was popularized as a given name by a character from the television series 'Charmed', which debuted in 1998.
REAGAN   f & m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ríagáin meaning "descendant of RIAGÁN". This surname was borne by American president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).
RYDER   m   English (Modern)
From an English occupational surname derived from Old English ridere meaning "mounted warrior" or "messenger".
RYKER   m   English (Modern)
Possibly a variant of the German surname Riker, a derivative of Low German rike "rich". It may have been altered by association with the popular name prefix Ry.
RYLAN   m   English (Modern)
Possibly a variant of the English surname Ryland, which was originally derived from a place name meaning "rye land" in Old English.
RYLEE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of RILEY.
SAWYER   m   English (Modern)
From a surname meaning "sawer of wood" in Middle English. Mark Twain used it for the hero in his novel 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876).
SERENITY   f   English (Modern)
From the English word meaning "serenity, tranquility", ultimately from Latin serenus meaning "clear, calm".
SIERRA   f   English (Modern)
Means "mountain range" in Spanish, referring specifically to a mountain range with jagged peaks.
SKYLAR   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of SKYLER.
SUMMER   f   English
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.
TANNER   m   English
From an English surname meaning "one who tans hides".
TRINITY   f   English
From the English word Trinity, given in honour of the Christian belief that God has one essence, but three distinct expressions of being: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It has only been in use as a given name since the 20th century.
TRISTAN   m   Welsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". Tristan is a character in medieval French tales, probably inspired by older Celtic legends, and ultimately merged into Arthurian legend. According to the story Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. On the way back, Tristan and Isolde accidentally drink a potion which makes them fall in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
WILLOW   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the tree, which is ultimately derived from Old English welig.
ZOEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ZOE.
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