Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is feminine; and the origin is Classical Latin.
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NÓIRÍNfIrish
Irish diminutive of NORA.
NONA (1)fRoman Mythology
Derived from Latin nonus meaning "ninth", referring to the nine months of pregnancy. This was the name of a Roman goddess of pregnancy. She was also one of the three Fates (or Parcae).
NONA (2)fEnglish, Ancient Roman (Rare)
Feminine form of NONUS. It was also used in 19th-century England, derived directly from Latin nonus "ninth" and traditionally given to the ninth-born child.
NONIEfEnglish
Diminutive of IONE or NORA.
NONNAfRussian
Russian form of NONA (2).
NÓRAfHungarian, Irish
Hungarian and Irish Gaelic form of NORA.
NORAfIrish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Italian
Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play 'A Doll's House' (1879).
NORAHfIrish, English
Variant of NORA.
NOREENfIrish, English
Diminutive of NORA.
NORENEfIrish, English
Diminutive of NORA.
NUBIAfVarious
From the name of the ancient region and kingdom in Africa, south of Egypt. It possibly derives from the Egyptian word nbw meaning "gold".
NUNZIAfItalian
Short form of ANNUNZIATA.
NUNZIATINAfItalian
Diminutive of NUNZIA.
OCTÁVIAfPortuguese
Portuguese form of OCTAVIA.
OCTAVIAfEnglish, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of the Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.
OLIVAfLate Roman
Late Latin name meaning "olive". This was the name of a 2nd-century saint from Brescia.
OLIVEfEnglish, French
From the English and French word for the type of tree, ultimately derived from Latin oliva.
OLÍVIAfPortuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian form of OLIVIA.
OLIVIAfEnglish, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
OLIVIEfFrench (Rare), Czech (Rare)
French and Czech form of OLIVIA.
OLIWIAfPolish
Polish form of OLIVIA.
OLLIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of OLIVER, OLIVIA or OLIVE.
ONÓRAfIrish
Irish form of HONORA.
ORALEEfEnglish (Rare)
Possibly a variant of AURÉLIE.
ORALIEfEnglish (Rare)
Possibly a variant of AURÉLIE.
ORIAfItalian
Italian form of AUREA.
ORIETTAfItalian
Diminutive of ORIA.
ORSINAfItalian
Feminine form of ORSINO.
ORSOLAfItalian
Italian form of URSULA.
ORSOLYAfHungarian
Hungarian form of URSULA.
OTÁVIAfPortuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of OCTAVIA.
OTTAVIAfItalian
Italian form of OCTAVIA.
PAAIEfManx
Manx form of PEGGY.
PACAfSpanish
Diminutive of FRANCISCA.
PÁDRAIGÍNfIrish
Irish form of PATRICIA.
PÁLAfIcelandic
Icelandic feminine form of PAUL.
PAOLAfItalian, Spanish
Italian feminine form of PAUL.
PAOLINAfItalian
Italian feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PAQUITAfSpanish
Diminutive of FRANCISCA.
PARNELfEnglish (Archaic)
Contracted form of PETRONEL. In the later Middle Ages it became a slang term for a promiscuous woman, and the name subsequently fell out of use.
PASCALEfFrench
Feminine form of PASCAL.
PASCALINEfFrench
Feminine form of PASCAL.
PASCUALAfSpanish
Spanish feminine form of PASCAL.
PASQUALINAfItalian
Italian feminine form of PASCAL.
PASTORAfSpanish
Feminine form of PASTOR.
PATm & fEnglish
Short form of PATRICK or PATRICIA. A famous bearer of this name was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
PATRÍCIAfSlovak, Portuguese, Hungarian
Slovak, Portuguese and Hungarian feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PATRICIAfEnglish, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK). In medieval England this spelling appears in Latin documents, but this form was probably not used as the actual name until the 18th century, in Scotland.
PATRICIEfCzech
Czech feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PATRICIJAfSlovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PATRIZIAfItalian
Italian feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PATRYCJAfPolish
Polish feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PATSYf & mEnglish, Irish
Variant of PATTY, also used as a diminutive of PATRICK.
PATTIfEnglish
Variant of PATTY.
PATTIEfEnglish
Variant of PATTY.
PATTYfEnglish
Originally a variant of Matty, a 17th-century diminutive of MARTHA. It is now commonly used as a diminutive of PATRICIA.
PÀULAfSardinian
Sardinian feminine form of Paulus (see PAUL).
PAULAfGerman, English, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Hungarian, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Paulus (see PAUL). This was the name of a 4th-century Roman saint who was a companion of Saint Jerome.
PAULEfFrench
French feminine form of Paulus (see PAUL).
PAULETTAfEnglish
Latinate feminine diminutive of PAUL.
PAULETTEfFrench
French feminine diminutive of PAUL.
PAULIENfDutch
Dutch feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PAULIINAfFinnish
Finnish form of PAULINA.
PAULÍNAfSlovak
Slovak form of PAULINA.
PAULINEfFrench, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PAULINHAfPortuguese
Portuguese diminutive of PAULA.
PAVICAfCroatian
Croatian diminutive of PAULA.
PAVLAfCzech
Czech feminine form of PAUL.
PAVLÍNAfCzech
Czech form of PAULINA.
PAVLINAfBulgarian, Macedonian, Greek
Bulgarian, Macedonian and Greek form of PAULINA.
PAXfRoman Mythology
Means "peace" in Latin. In Roman mythology this was the name of the goddess of peace.
PAZ (1)fSpanish
Means "peace" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de la Paz, meaning "Our Lady of Peace".
PEARLfEnglish
From the English word pearl for the concretions formed in the shells of some mollusks, ultimately from Late Latin perla. Like other gemstone names, it has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. The pearl is the birthstone for June, and it supposedly imparts health and wealth.
PEARLEfEnglish
Variant of PEARL.
PEARLIEfEnglish
Diminutive of PEARL.
PEGfEnglish
Short form of PEGGY.
PEGGIEfEnglish
Variant of PEGGY.
PEGGYfEnglish
Medieval variant of Meggy, a diminutive of MARGARET. The reason for the change in the initial consonant is unknown.
PEIGIfScottish
Scottish diminutive of MARGARET.
PERELEfYiddish
Variant of PERLE.
PERLAfItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish cognate of PEARL.
PERLEfFrench, Yiddish
French and Yiddish cognate of PEARL. It is also used as a Yiddish vernacular form of Margaret.
PERLITAfItalian, Spanish
Diminutive of PERLA.
PERNILLAfSwedish
Swedish short form of PETRONILLA.
PERNILLEfDanish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian short form of PETRONILLA.
PERPETUAfSpanish (Rare), Late Roman
Derived from Latin perpetuus meaning "continuous". This was the name of a 3rd-century saint martyred with another woman named Felicity.
PETRONAfSpanish
Possibly a feminine form of PETRONIUS.
PETRONELfEnglish (Archaic)
Medieval English form of PETRONILLA.
PETRONELAfRomanian, Slovak, Polish
Romanian, Slovak and Polish form of PETRONILLA.
PETRONELLAfDutch, Swedish
Dutch and Swedish form of PETRONILLA.
PETRONILLAfItalian, Late Roman
From a Latin name, a diminutive of Petronia, the feminine form of PETRONIUS. This was the name of an obscure 1st-century Roman saint, later believed to be a daughter of Saint Peter.
PÍAfSpanish
Spanish feminine form of PIUS.
PIIAfFinnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of PIA.
PIRIfHungarian
Diminutive of PIROSKA.
PIROSKAfHungarian
Hungarian form of PRISCA, influenced by the Hungarian word piros meaning "red".
PLACIDAfLate Roman, Italian
Feminine form of Placidus (see PLACIDO).
PLACIDEm & fFrench
French masculine and feminine form of Placidus (see PLACIDO).
POLINAfRussian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Greek
Either a Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian and Greek form of PAULINA or a short form of APOLLINARIYA.
POLYAfBulgarian
Diminutive of POLINA.
POMONAfRoman Mythology
From Latin pomus "fruit tree". This was the name of the Roman goddess of fruit trees.
PORCIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of PORCIUS.
PORTIAfEnglish
Variant of Porcia, the feminine form of the Roman family name PORCIUS, used by William Shakespeare for the heroine of his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596). In the play Portia is a woman who disguises herself as a man in order to defend Antonio in court. It is also the name of a moon of Uranus, after the Shakespearian character.
PRIMITIVAfSpanish, Late Roman
Feminine form of PRIMITIVUS. Saint Primitiva was an early martyr from Rome.
PRINCESSfEnglish (Modern)
Feminine equivalent of PRINCE.
PRISfEnglish
Short form of PRISCILLA.
PRISCAfBiblical, Dutch, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin
Feminine form of Priscus, a Roman family name which meant "ancient" in Latin. This name appears in the epistles in the New Testament, referring to Priscilla the wife of Aquila.
PRISCILAfPortuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of PRISCILLA.
PRISCILLAfEnglish, Italian, French, Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman name, a diminutive of PRISCA. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lived with Priscilla (also known as Prisca) and her husband Aquila in Corinth for a while. It has been used as an English given name since the Protestant Reformation, being popular with the Puritans. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used it in his poem 'The Courtship of Miles Standish' (1858).
PRISCILLEfFrench
French form of PRISCILLA.
PRISKAfGerman, Biblical Greek
German form of PRISCA, as well as the form used in the Greek New Testament.
PRISKILLAfBiblical Greek
Form of PRISCILLA used in the Greek New Testament.
PRISSYfEnglish
Diminutive of PRISCILLA.
PROSERPINAfRoman Mythology
Means "to emerge" in Latin. She was the Roman equivalent of the Greek goddess Persephone.
PRUfEnglish
Short form of PRUDENCE.
PRUDENCEf & mEnglish, French
Medieval English form of Prudentia, the feminine form of PRUDENTIUS. In France it is both the feminine form and a rare masculine form. In England it was used during the Middle Ages and was revived in the 17th century by the Puritans, in part from the English word prudence, ultimately of the same source.
PRUDENCIAfSpanish
Spanish feminine form of PRUDENTIUS.
PRUEfEnglish
Short form of PRUDENCE.
QUINTELLAfEnglish (Rare)
Feminine diminutive of QUINTUS.
QUIRINAfLate Roman
Feminine form of QUIRINUS.
RAINAfBulgarian
Variant transcription of RAYNA (1).
RAINEf & mEnglish (Rare)
Possibly based on the French word reine meaning "queen". A famous bearer is the British socialite Raine Spencer (1929-), the stepmother of Princess Diana. In modern times it can also be used as a variant of RAIN (1) or a short form of LORRAINE.
RAISA (2)fYiddish
Means "rose" in Yiddish.
RAISELfYiddish
Diminutive of RAISA (2).
RANDI (1)fEnglish
Diminutive of MIRANDA.
RANDYm & fEnglish
Diminutive of RANDALL, RANDOLF or MIRANDA.
RAYNA (1)fBulgarian
Either a Bulgarian form of REGINA or a feminine form of RAYNO.
REENIEfEnglish (Rare)
Either a variant of RENÉE or a diminutive of names ending in reen.
REETAfFinnish
Finnish short form of MARGARET.
REETTAfFinnish
Finnish short form of MARGARET.
REGANAfEnglish (Rare)
Elaboration of REGAN, influenced by REGINA.
REGENAfEnglish
Variant of REGINA.
REGINAfEnglish, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.
RÉGINEfFrench
French form of REGINA.
REGINEfGerman, Norwegian
German and Norwegian form of REGINA.
REGULAfGerman (Swiss), Late Roman
Means "rule" in Latin. This was the name of a 3rd-century Swiss martyr, the patron saint of Zurich.
REINA (1)fSpanish
Means "queen" in Spanish.
REMEDIOSfSpanish
Means "remedies" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de los Remedios, meaning "Our Lady of the Remedies".
REMEIfCatalan
Means "remedy" in Catalan, a Catalan equivalent of REMEDIOS.
RENAfEnglish
Latinate feminine form of RENÉ.
RENAEfEnglish
English variant of RENÉE.
RENÁTAfHungarian, Czech, Slovak
Hungarian, Czech and Slovak feminine form of RENATUS.
RENATEfGerman, Dutch, Norwegian
German, Dutch and Norwegian feminine form of RENATUS.
RENEm & fEnglish
English form of RENÉ or RENÉE.
RENÉEfFrench, Dutch
French feminine form of RENÉ.
RENEEfEnglish
English form of RENÉE.
RENIAfPolish
Polish diminutive of RENATA.
RENIEfEnglish (Rare)
Possibly a diminutive of RENEE.
RENITAfEnglish
Probably a feminine form of RENATUS. It came into use during the 1950s.
RENZAfItalian
Short form of LORENZA.
REXANNEfEnglish (Rare)
Variant of ROXANE influenced by REX.
REYESf & mSpanish
Means "kings" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, La Virgen de los Reyes, meaning "The Virgin of the Kings". According to legend, the Virgin Mary appeared to King Ferdinand III of Castile and told him his armies would defeat those of the Moors in Seville.
RINA (1)fItalian, Dutch
Short form of CATERINA or CATHARINA as well as other names ending in rina.
RINIm & fDutch
Diminutive of MARINUS, MARINA or CATHARINA.
RINYm & fDutch
Diminutive of MARINUS, MARINA or CATHARINA.
RITAfItalian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of MARGHERITA and other names ending in rita. A famous bearer was American actress Rita Hayworth (1918-1987).
RÓISfIrish
Irish cognate of ROSE.
RÓISÍNfIrish
Diminutive of RÓIS.
ROMA (2)fVarious
From the name of the Italian city, commonly called Rome in English.
ROMAINEfFrench, English
French feminine form of Romanus (see ROMAN).
ROMÁNAfHungarian (Rare)
Hungarian feminine form of Romanus (see ROMAN).
ROMANAfItalian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Late Roman
Feminine form of Romanus (see ROMAN).
ROMANEfFrench
French feminine form of Romanus (see ROMAN).
ROMINAfItalian
Possibly a variant of ROMANA.
ROMOLAfItalian
Italian feminine form of ROMULUS.
ROOSfDutch
Dutch vernacular form of ROSA (1), meaning "rose" in Dutch.
ROOSJEfDutch
Diminutive of ROSA (1).
ROSA (1)fSpanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).
ROSABELfEnglish (Rare)
Combination of ROSA (1) and the popular name suffix bel. It was created in the 18th century.
ROSALBAfItalian
Italian name meaning "white rose", derived from Latin rosa "rose" and alba "white". A famous bearer was the Venetian painter Rosalba Carriera (1675-1757).
ROSÁLIAfPortuguese
Portuguese form of ROSALIA.
ROSALÍAfSpanish, Galician
Spanish and Galician form of ROSALIA.
ROSALIAfItalian, Late Roman
Late Latin name derived from rosa "rose". This was the name of a 12th-century Sicilian saint.
ROSALIEfFrench, German, Dutch, English
French, German and Dutch form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie 'Rosalie' (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.
ROSANGELAfItalian
Combination of ROSA (1) and ANGELA.
ROSANNAfItalian, English
Combination of ROSA (1) and ANNA.
ROSANNEfEnglish, Dutch
Combination of ROSE and ANNE (1).
ROSARIAfItalian
Italian feminine form of ROSARIO.
ROSÁRIOfPortuguese
Portuguese (feminine) form of ROSARIO.
ROSARIOf & mSpanish, Italian
Means "rosary", and is taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora del Rosario meaning "Our Lady of the Rosary". This name is feminine in Spanish and masculine in Italian.
ROSEfEnglish, French
Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
ROSELLAfItalian
Italian diminutive of ROSA (1).
ROSELLEfFrench (Rare)
French diminutive of ROSE.
ROSEMARYfEnglish
Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
ROSERfCatalan
Catalan (feminine) form of ROSARIO.
ROSETTAfItalian
Italian diminutive of ROSA (1).
ROSETTEfFrench
French diminutive of ROSE.
ROSHEENfIrish
Anglicized form of RÓISÍN.
ROSIEfEnglish
Diminutive of ROSE.
ROSINAfItalian
Italian diminutive of ROSA (1). This is the name of a character in Rossini's opera 'The Barber of Seville' (1816).
ROSINEfFrench
French diminutive of ROSE.
ROSINHAfPortuguese
Portuguese diminutive of ROSA (1).
ROSITAfSpanish
Spanish diminutive of ROSA (1).
ROSYfEnglish
Diminutive of ROSE.
RÓŻAfPolish
Means "rose" in Polish. It is a cognate of ROSA (1).
ROZA (1)fRussian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Means "rose" in some Slavic languages. It is a cognate of ROSA (1).
ROZÁLIAfHungarian, Slovak
Hungarian and Slovak form of ROSALIA.
ROZALIAfPolish, Romanian
Polish and Romanian form of ROSALIA.
ROZÁLIEfCzech
Czech form of ROSALIA.
ROZĀLIJAfLatvian
Latvian form of ROSALIA.
ROZALIYAfRussian
Russian form of ROSALIA.
ROŽĖfLithuanian
Means "rose" in Lithuanian. It is a cognate of ROSA (1).
ROZIKAfCroatian
Croatian diminutive of ROZALIJA.
RÓZSAfHungarian
Means "rose" in Hungarian. It is a cognate of ROSA (1).
RÓZSIfHungarian
Diminutive of RÓZSA.
RUBINAfItalian
Derived from Italian rubino meaning "ruby", ultimately from Latin ruber "red".
RUBYfEnglish
Simply from the name of the precious stone (which ultimately derives from Latin ruber "red"), which is the birthstone of July. It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
RUBYEfEnglish
Variant of RUBY.
RUŽAfCroatian, Serbian
Means "rose" in Croatian and Serbian. It is a cognate of ROSA (1).
RŮŽENAfCzech
Derived from Czech růže meaning "rose".
RUZHAfBulgarian, Macedonian
Means "hollyhock" in Bulgarian and Macedonian (referring to flowering plants from the genera Alcea and Althaea).
RUŽICAfCroatian
Diminutive of RUŽA.
SABIENfDutch
Dutch form of SABINA.
SABINAfItalian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Swedish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Sabinus, a Roman cognomen meaning "Sabine" in Latin. The Sabines were an ancient people who lived in central Italy, their lands eventually taken over by the Romans after several wars. According to legend, the Romans abducted several Sabine women during a raid, and when the men came to rescue them, the women were able to make peace between the two groups. This name was borne by several early saints.
SABINEfFrench, German, Danish
French, German and Danish form of SABINA.
SALf & mEnglish
Short form of SALLY, SALVADOR, and other names beginning with Sal.
SALACIAfRoman Mythology
Derived from Latin sal meaning "salt". This was the name of the Roman goddess of salt water.
SALENAfEnglish (Modern)
Perhaps an invented name based on similar-sounding names such as SELINA.
SALINAfEnglish
Perhaps an invented name based on similar-sounding names such as SELINA.
SALUDfSpanish
Spanish cognate of SALUT.
SALUTfCatalan
Means "health" or "cheers" in Catalan.
SALVATRICEfItalian
From Salvatrix, the feminine form of Salvator (see SALVADOR).
SALVATRIXfLate Roman
Feminine form of SALVATOR.
SAMARAfEnglish (Modern), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Possibly derived from the name of the city of Samarra (in Iraq) or Samara (in Russia). The former appears in the title of the novel 'Appointment in Samarra' (1934) by John O'Hara, which refers to an ancient Babylonian legend about a man trying to evade death. Alternatively, this name could be derived from the word for the winged seeds which grow on trees such as maples and elms.... [more]
SANCHAfSpanish
Feminine form of SANCHO.
SANCHIAfSpanish
Feminine form of SANCHO.
SANELAfCroatian
Apparently derived from Latin sana meaning "healthy".
SANTAfItalian
Feminine form of SANTO.
SANTINAfItalian
Feminine diminutive of SANTO.
SANTUZZAfItalian
Diminutive of SANTA.
SARINAfDutch, English (Modern)
Diminutive of SARA. In modern times it may also be a variant of SERENA.
SATURNINAfAncient Roman, Spanish
Feminine form of SATURNINUS. This was the name of a legendary saint who was supposedly martyred in northern France.
SAVINAfItalian
Italian variant of SABINA.
SCHOLASTICAfLate Roman
From a Late Latin name which was derived from scholasticus meaning "rhetorician, orator". Saint Scholastica was a 6th-century Benedictine abbess, the sister of Saint Benedict of Nursia.
SCILLAfItalian
Short form of PRISCILLA. This is also the Italian word for the squill flower (genus Scilla).
SEBASTIANAfItalian
Italian feminine form of Sebastianus (see SEBASTIAN).
SÉBASTIENNEfFrench
French feminine form of Sebastianus (see SEBASTIAN).
SELINAfEnglish
Possibly a variant of CÉLINE or SELENE. As an English name, it first came into use in the 17th century.
SENTAfGerman
Diminutive of KRESZENTIA.
SEPTIMAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of SEPTIMUS.
SERAfEnglish (Rare)
Either a variant of SARAH or a short form of SERAPHINA.
SERAFIMAfRussian, Macedonian
Russian and Macedonian form of SERAPHINA.
SERAFINAfItalian, Portuguese, Spanish, Polish (Rare)
Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and Polish form of SERAPHINA.
SERAPHINAfEnglish (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.
SÉRAPHINEfFrench
French form of SERAPHINA.
SERENAfEnglish, Italian, Late Roman
From a Late Latin name which was derived from Latin serenus meaning "clear, tranquil, serene". This name was borne by an obscure early saint. Edmund Spenser also used it in his poem 'The Faerie Queene' (1590).
SERGINEfFrench
French feminine form of SERGIUS.
SERINAfEnglish
Variant of SERENA.
SÉVERINEfFrench
French feminine form of SEVERINUS.
SHAYLAfEnglish
Variant of SHEILA, influenced by the spelling and sound of KAYLA.
SHEILAfIrish, English
Anglicized form of SÍLE.
SHELIAfEnglish
Variant of SHEILA.
SHPRINTZAfYiddish
Possibly a Yiddish form of ESPERANZA.
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