Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is feminine; and the origin is Old English.
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ÆBBE   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EBBA (2).
ÆLFFLÆD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name composed of the elements ælf "elf" and flæd "beauty".
ÆLFGIFU   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and giefu "gift". This was the name of the first wife of the English king Æðelræd II.
ÆLFSWIÞ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ælf "elf" combined with swiþ "strong".
ÆLFÞRYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ELFREDA.
ÆLFTHRYTH   f   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of Ælfþryð (see ELFREDA).
ÆÐELFLÆD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name composed of the elements æðel "noble" and flæd "beauty". Æðelflæd was a 10th-century queen of Mercia.
ÆÐELIND   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ETHELINDA.
ÆÐELÞRYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and þryð "strength".
AINSLEE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AINSLEY.
AINSLEY   f & m   Scottish, English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
AINSLIE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AINSLEY.
ALDITH   f   Medieval English
Middle English form of EALDGYÐ.
ALDUS   m & f   Medieval English
Medieval variant of ALDOUS.
ALVENA   f   English
Feminine form of ALVIN.
ALVINA   f   English
Feminine form of ALVIN.
AMBERLY   f   English (Modern)
Elaboration of AMBER, influenced by the spelling of the name KIMBERLY.
ANNALEE   f   English (Rare)
Combination of ANNA and LEE.
ANSLEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of AINSLEY.
ASH   m & f   English
Short form of ASHLEY. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.
ASHLEA   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEIGH   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.
ASHLIE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLYN   f   English (Modern)
Combination of ASHLEY and the popular name suffix lyn.
ASHLYNN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ASHLYN.
ASTON   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from either a place name meaning "east town" in Old English or from the given name ÆÐELSTAN.
AUDIE   f   English
Diminutive of AUDREY.
AUDRA (2)   f   English
Variant of AUDREY, used since the 19th century.
AUDREA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AUDREY.
AUDREY   f   English
Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
AVERILL   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
AVERY   m & f   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
BEV   f   English
Short form of BEVERLY.
BEVERLEY   f   English
Variant of BEVERLY.
BEVERLY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's novel 'Beverly of Graustark' (1904).
BROOK   m & f   English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived near a brook.
BROOKE   f   English
Variant of BROOK. The name came into use in the 1950s, probably influenced by American socialite Brooke Astor (1902-2007). It was further popularized by actress Brooke Shields (1965-).
BROOKLYN   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the borough of New York City, originally derived from Dutch Breukelen meaning "broken land". It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn.
CYNEBURG   f   Anglo-Saxon
Means "royal fortress" from Old English cyne "royal" and burg "fortress". Saint Cyneburga, a daughter of a king of Mercia, was the founder of an abbey at Gloucester in the 7th century.
DITTE   f   Danish
Danish diminutive of EDITH or DOROTHEA.
DREDA   f   English (Archaic)
Short form of ETHELDREDA.
DUDA   m & f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO or EDUARDA.
EADBURG   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and burg "fortress".
EADGYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDITH.
EALDGYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eald "old" and gyð "battle".
EBBA (2)   f   English
From the Old English name Æbbe, meaning unknown, perhaps a contracted form of a longer name. Saint Ebba was a 7th-century daughter of king Æthelfrith of Bernicia and the founder of monasteries in Scotland. Another saint Ebba was a 9th-century abbess and martyr who mutilated her own face so that she would not be raped by the invading Danes.
EDA (2)   f   Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of EDITH.
EDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDIE   f   English
Diminutive of EDITH.
EDIT   f   Hungarian, Swedish
Hungarian and Swedish form of EDITH.
EDITE   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of EDITH.
ÉDITH   f   French
French form of EDITH.
EDITH   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
EDMÉE   f   French (Rare)
Feminine form of EDMÉ.
EDMONDA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of EDMUND.
EDMONDE   f   French
French feminine form of EDMUND.
EDUARDA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of EDWARD.
EDWEENA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of EDWINA.
EDWENA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of EDWINA.
EDWINA   f   English
Feminine form of EDWIN.
EDWYNA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of EDWINA.
EDYTA   f   Polish
Polish form of EDITH.
EDYTHA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of EDYTHE.
EDYTHE   f   English
Variant of EDITH.
ELFLEDA   f   English (Archaic)
Middle English form of both the Old English names ÆÐELFLÆD and ÆLFFLÆD. These names became rare after the Norman conquest, but Elfleda was briefly revived in the 19th century.
ELFREDA   f   English
Middle English form of the Old English name Ælfþryð meaning "elf strength", derived from the element ælf "elf" combined with þryð "strength". Ælfþryð was common amongst Anglo-Saxon nobility, being borne for example by the mother of king Æðelræd the Unready. This name was rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 19th century.
ELFRIDA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ELFREDA.
ELFRIEDA   f   English
Variant of ELFREDA.
ELFRIEDE   f   German
German form of ELFREDA.
ELVINA   f   English
Variant of ALVINA.
EOFORHILD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and hild "battle". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ETHEL   f   English
Short form of names beginning with the Old English element æðel meaning "noble". It was coined in the 19th century, when many Old English names were revived. It was popularized by the novels 'The Newcomes' (1855) by William Makepeace Thackeray and 'The Daisy Chain' (1856) by C. M. Yonge. A famous bearer was American actress and singer Ethel Merman (1908-1984).
ETHELDRED   f   Medieval English
Middle English form of ÆÐELÞRYÐ.
ETHELDREDA   f   Medieval English
Middle English form of ÆÐELÞRYÐ.
ETHELINDA   f   English (Archaic)
Middle English form of the Old English name Æðelind, derived from the elements æðel "noble" and lindi "snake". The name was very rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the early 19th century.
ETHELYN   f   English
Diminutive of ETHEL.
EVERILD   f   History
Latinized form of EOFORHILD. This was the name of a 7th-century English saint.
FREDA   f   English
Short form of names ending in freda or fred, such as WINIFRED or ALFREDA.
FREDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of FREDERICK or FREDA.
FREIDA   f   English
Variant of FRIEDA.
FRIDESWIDE   f   History
Modern form of the Old English name Friðuswiþ, formed of the elements friþ "peace" and swiþ "strong". Saint Frideswide was an 8th-century English princess who became a nun. She is credited with establishing Christ Church in Oxford.
FRIEDA   f   German, English
Variant of FRIDA.
FRIEDE   f   German
Short form of names containing the element fried, derived from the Germanic element frid meaning "peace".
FRIÐUSWIÞ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of FRIDESWIDE.
GODGIFU   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of GODIVA.
GODIVA   f   Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Old English name Godgifu meaning "gift of god", from the elements god and giefu "gift". Lady Godiva was an 11th-century English noblewoman who, according to legend, rode naked through the streets of Coventry to protest the high taxes imposed by her husband upon the townspeople.
HAILEE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAILEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAILIE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HALEIGH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HALEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HARLEY   m & f   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HAYLEE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAYLEIGH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAYLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English town (meaning "hay clearing" from Old English heg "hay" and leah "clearing"). It was popularized by the British child actress Hayley Mills (1946-), though the name did not become common until over a decade after she first became famous.
HAYLIE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HILD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of HILDA.
HILDA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HILDRED   f & m   English
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel". This name was revived in the late 19th century, probably because of its similarity to the popular names Hilda and Mildred.
HUNTER   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
HYLDA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of HILDA.
JAYLEE   f   English (Modern)
Combination of JAY (1) and LEE.
KENDRA   f   English
Feminine form of KEN (1) or KENDRICK.
KIM (1)   f & m   English
At the present it is usually considered a short form of KIMBERLY, but it in fact predates it as a given name. The author Rudyard Kipling used it for the title hero of his novel 'Kim' (1901), though in this case it was short for KIMBALL. In her novel 'Show Boat' (1926) Edna Ferber used it for a female character who was born on the Mississippi River and was named from the initials of the states Kentucky, Illinois and Mississippi. The name was popularized in America by the actresses Kim Hunter (1922-2002) and Kim Novak (1933-), both of whom assumed it as a stage name.
KIMBERLEE   f   English
Variant of KIMBERLY.
KIMBERLEY   f   English
Variant of KIMBERLY.
KIMBERLY   f   English
From the name of the city of Kimberley in South Africa, which was named after Lord KIMBERLEY (1826-1902). The city came to prominence in the late 19th century during the Boer War. Kimberly has been used as a given name since the mid-20th century, eventually becoming very popular as a feminine name.
KIMBERLYN   f   English (Rare)
Combination of KIMBERLY and LYNN.
KIMBRA   f   English (Rare)
Diminutive of KIMBERLY.
KIMMIE   f   English
Diminutive of KIMBERLY or KIM (1).
KIMMY   f   English
Diminutive of KIMBERLY or KIM (1).
KINBOROUGH   f   Medieval English
Middle English form of CYNEBURG.
KINSLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was derived from the given name CYNESIGE.
KYM   f   English (Rare)
Variant of KIM (1).
LEANN   f   English
Combination of LEE and ANN.
LEANNA   f   English
Probably this was originally a variant of LIANA. It is now often considered a combination of LEE and ANNA.
LEANNE   f   English
Combination of LEE and ANNE (1).
LEE   m & f   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. In his honour, it has been commonly used as a given name in the American South.
LEEANN   f   English
Combination of LEE and ANN.
LEIGH   f & m   English
From a surname which was a variant of LEE.
LEOFFLÆD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and flæd "beauty".
LIANNE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of LEANNE.
MAXENE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of MAXINE.
MAXINE   f   English
Feminine form of MAX. It has been commonly used only since the beginning of the 20th century.
MILBURGA   f   History
Derived from the Old English elements milde "gentle" and burg "fortress". Saint Milburga, the sister of Saint Mildred, was a daughter of a 7th-century Mercian king. She was supposedly in possession of magical powers.
MILDBURG   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of MILBURGA.
MILDGYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements milde "gentle" and gyð "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century saint, the sister of Saint Mildred.
MILDRED   f   English
From the Old English name Mildþryð meaning "gentle strength", derived from the elements milde "gentle" and þryð "strength". Saint Mildred was a 7th-century abbess, the daughter of the Kentish princess Saint Ermenburga. After the Norman conquest this name became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
MILDÞRYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of MILDRED.
MILLIE   f   English
Diminutive of MILDRED, MILLICENT and other names containing the same sound.
MILLY   f   Swedish, Norwegian, English
Diminutive of EMILIE, MILDRED and other names containing the same sound.
MONET   f & m   Various
From a French surname which was derived from either HAMON or EDMOND. This was the surname of the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
PAYTON   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of PEYTON.
PEYTON   m & f   English
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "PÆGA's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress. It is also borne by American football quarterback Peyton Manning (1976-).
PRESLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest clearing" (Old English preost and leah). This surname was borne by musician Elvis Presley (1935-1977).
PUCK   m & f   Anglo-Saxon Mythology, Dutch
Meaning unknown, from Old English puca. It could ultimately be of either Germanic or Celtic origin. In English legend this was the name of a mischievous spirit, also known as Robin Goodfellow. He appears in Shakespeare's play 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1600).
STONE   m & f   English (Modern)
From the English vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English stan.
STORM   m & f   English (Modern), Danish, Norwegian
From the vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English storm, or in the case of the Scandinavian name, from Old Norse stormr.
SUNNGIFU   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of SUNNIVA.
SUNNIFA   f   Medieval Scandinavian
Old Norse form of SUNNIVA.
SUNNIVA   f   Norwegian
Scandinavian form of the Old English name Sunngifu, which meant "sun gift" from the Old English elements sunne "sun" and giefu "gift". This was the name of a legendary English saint who was shipwrecked in Norway and killed by the inhabitants.
SYNNE   f   Norwegian
Short form of SYNNØVE.
SYNNÖVE   f   Swedish
Swedish form of SUNNIVA.
SYNNØVE   f   Norwegian
Norwegian variant of SUNNIVA.
TATUM   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "Tata's homestead" in Old English.
WASSA   f   Anglo-Saxon
Meaning uncertain. It may be a short form of a longer name such as Wāðsige, composed of the elements wāð "hunt" and sige "victory".
WHITNEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "white island" in Old English. Its popular use as a feminine name was initiated by actress Whitney Blake (1925-2002) in the 1960s, and further boosted in the 1980s by singer Whitney Houston (1963-2012).
WIL   m & f   English, Dutch
Short form of WILLIAM and other names beginning with Wil.
WILBURG   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wil "will, desire" and burg "fortress".
WILBURH   f   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of WILBURG.
WILFREDA   f   English (Rare)
Feminine form of WILFRED.
WILLA   f   English
Feminine form of WILLIAM.
WINIFRED   f   Welsh, English
Anglicized form of GWENFREWI, the spelling altered by association with WINFRED. It became used in England in the 16th century.
WINNIE   f   English
Diminutive of WINIFRED. Winnie-the-Pooh, a stuffed bear in the children's books by A. A. Milne, was named after a real bear named Winnipeg who lived at the London Zoo.
WINNIFRED   f   Welsh, English
Variant of WINIFRED.
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