Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is feminine; and the usage is French.
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ADÉLAÏDE   f   French
French form of ADELAIDE.
ADÈLE   f   French
French form of ADELA.
ADELINE   f   French, English
Diminutive of ADÈLE.
ADRIENNE   f   French
French feminine form of ADRIAN.
AGLAÉ   f   French
French form of AGLAIA.
AGNÈS   f   French, Catalan
French and Catalan form of AGNES.
AIMÉE   f   French
French form of AMY.
ALBERTE (2)   f   French, Danish
French and Danish feminine form of ALBERT.
ALBERTINE   f   French
French feminine form of ALBERT.
ALBINE   f   French, German
French form and German variant of ALBINA.
ALEX   m & f   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXANDRA   f   English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALEXANDRIE   f   French (Rare)
French variant of ALEXANDRA.
ALEXANDRINE   f   French, German
French and German elaborated form of ALEXANDRA. This was the name of a Danish queen, the wife of King Christian X.
ALEXIA   f   French, English (Modern)
Feminine form of ALEXIS.
ALEXIS   m & f   German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
ALICE   f   English, French, Portuguese, Italian
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).
ALINE   f   French, Portuguese (Brazilian), English
Medieval short form of ADELINE. As an English name, in modern times it has sometimes been regarded as a variant of EILEEN. This was the name of a popular 1965 song by the French singer Christophe.
ALISON   f   English, French
Norman French diminutive of Aalis (see ALICE). It was common in England and France in the Middle Ages, and was later revived in the 20th century. Unlike most other English names ending in son, it is not derived from a surname.
ALIX   f   French
Medieval French variant of ALICE.
ALPHONSINE   f   French
French feminine diminutive of ALFONSO.
AMANDINE   f   French
French diminutive of AMANDA.
AMARANTE   f   French (Rare)
French form of AMARANTHA.
AMBRE   f   French
French cognate of AMBER.
AMÉLIE   f   French
French form of AMELIA.
AMOUR   m & f   French
French form of AMOR.
ANAÏS   f   Occitan, Catalan, French
Occitan and Catalan form of ANNA.
ANASTASIE   f   French
French form of ANASTASIA.
ANDRÉE   f   French
French feminine form of ANDREW.
ANGÈLE   f   French
French feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
ANGELINE   f   French
French diminutive of ANGELA.
ANGÉLIQUE   f   French
French form of ANGELICA.
ANNA   f   English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.... [more]
ANNABELLE   f   English, French
Variant of ANNABEL. It can also be taken as a combination of ANNA and BELLE.
ANNE (1)   f   French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Basque
French form of ANNA. In the 13th-century it was imported to England, where it was also commonly spelled Ann. The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in 'Anne of Green Gables' (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.
ANNETTE   f   French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch
French diminutive of ANNE (1). It has also been widely used in the English-speaking world, and it became popular in America in the late 1950s due to the fame of actress Annette Funicello (1942-).
ANNICK   f   Breton
Breton diminutive of ANNA.
ANNIE   f   English, French, Dutch
Diminutive of ANNE (1).
ANOUK   f   Dutch, French
Dutch and French diminutive of ANNA.
ANTOINETTE   f   French
Feminine diminutive of ANTOINE. This name was borne by Marie Antoinette, the queen of France during the French Revolution. She was executed by guillotine.
APOLLINE   f   French
French form of APOLLONIA.
ARIANE   f   French, German, Dutch
French form of ARIADNE.
ARIANNE   f   French
Variant of ARIANE.
ARIEL   m & f   Hebrew, English, French, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Means "lion of God" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament it is used as another name for the city of Jerusalem. Shakespeare used it as the name of a spirit in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), and one of the moons of Uranus bears this name in his honour. As an English name, it became more common for females in the 1980s, especially after it was used for the title character in the Walt Disney film 'The Little Mermaid' (1989).
ARIELLE   f   French
French feminine form of ARIEL.
ARLETTE   f   French
French form of HERLEVA.
ARMELLE   f   French
Feminine form of ARMEL.
ARNAUDE   f   French (Rare)
French feminine form of ARNOLD.
ASTRID   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.
ASTRIDE   f   French
French variant of ASTRID.
ATHÉNAÏS   f   French
French form of ATHENAIS.
AUDE   f   French
French feminine form of ALDO.
AUGUSTINE (2)   f   French, German
French feminine form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AURÉLIE   f   French
French feminine form of AURELIUS.
AURORE   f   French
French form of AURORA.
AVRIL   f   French (Rare), English (Rare)
French form of APRIL.
AXELLE   f   French
Feminine form of AXEL.
BABETTE   f   French
French diminutive of ELIZABETH.
BARBARA   f   English, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.
BÉATRICE   f   French
French form of BEATRIX.
BÉNÉDICTE   f   French
French feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENJAMINE   f   French
French feminine form of BENJAMIN.
BENOITE   f   French
French feminine form of BENEDICT.
BÉRENGÈRE   f   French
French form of BERENGARIA.
BÉRÉNICE   f   French
French form of BERENICE.
BERNADETTE   f   French, English
French feminine form of BERNARD. Saint Bernadette was a young woman from Lourdes in France who claimed to have seen visions of the Virgin Mary.
BERNARDINE   f   French (Rare)
French feminine form of BERNARD.
BERTHE   f   French
French form of BERTHA.
BERTILLE   f   French
French diminutive of BERTHA.
BLANCHE   f   French, English
From a medieval French nickname meaning "white, fair". This name and its cognates in other languages are ultimately derived from the Germanic word blanc. An early bearer was the 12th-century Blanca of Navarre, the wife of Sancho III of Castile. Her granddaughter of the same name married Louis VIII of France, with the result that the name became more common in France.
BLANDINE   f   French
French form of the Roman name Blandina, which was the feminine form of Blandinus, which was itself a derivative of the cognomen BLANDUS. Saint Blandina was a 2nd-century slave from Lyons who was martyred by being thrown to wild beasts.
BRIGITTE   f   German, French
German and French form of BRIDGET.
CAMILLE   f & m   French, English
French feminine and masculine form of CAMILLA. It is also used in the English-speaking world, where it is generally only feminine.
CANDIDE   m & f   French
French form of CANDIDUS or CANDIDA.
CAPUCINE   f   French
Means "nasturtium" in French. This was the stage name of the French actress and model Capucine (1928-1990).
CARINE   f   French
French form of CARINA (1). It can also function as a short form of CATHERINE, via Swedish Karin.
CAROLE   f   French
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CASSANDRA   f   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.... [more]
CATHERINE   f   French, English
French form of KATHERINE, and also a common English variant.
CÉCILE   f   French, Dutch
French form of CECILIA.
CÉLESTE   f & m   French
French feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS.
CÉLESTINE   f   French
French feminine form of CAELESTINUS.
CÉLINE   f   French
French feminine form of CAELINUS. This name can also function as a short form of MARCELINE.
CERISE   f   French
Means "cherry" in French.
CHANTAL   f   French, English, Dutch
From a French surname which was derived from a place name meaning "stony". It was originally given in honour of Saint Jeanne-Françoise de Chantal, the founder of the Visitation Order in the 17th century. It has become associated with French chant "song".
CHARLINE   f   French
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES.
CHARLOTTE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.
CHLOÉ   f   French
French form of CHLOE.
CHRISTELLE   f   French
French diminutive of CHRISTINE.
CHRISTIANE   f   German, French
German and French feminine form of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French form of CHRISTINA, as well as a variant in other languages.
CLAIRE   f   French, English
French form of CLARA.
CLARISSE   f   French
French form of CLARICE.
CLAUDE   m & f   French, English
French masculine and feminine form of CLAUDIUS. In France the masculine name has been common since the Middle Ages due to the 7th-century Saint Claude of Besançon. It was imported to Britain in the 16th century by the aristocratic Hamilton family, who had French connections. A famous bearer of this name was the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
CLAUDETTE   f   French
French feminine form of CLAUDIUS.
CLAUDIE   f   French
French feminine variant of CLAUDE.
CLAUDINE   f   French
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS.
CLÉMENCE   f   French
French feminine form of Clementius (see CLEMENT).
CLEMENTINE   f   French
French feminine form of CLEMENT.
CLOÉ   f   Portuguese, French
Portuguese form and French variant of CHLOE.
CLOTHILDE   f   French
Variant of CLOTILDE.
CLOTILDE   f   French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
French form of the Germanic name Chlotichilda which was composed of the elements hlud "fame" and hild "battle". Saint Clotilde was the wife of the Frankish king Clovis, whom she converted to Christianity.
COLETTE   f   French
Short form of NICOLETTE. Saint Colette was a 15th-century French nun who gave her money to the poor. This was also the pen name of the French author Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954).
COLINE   f   French
Short form of NICOLINE.
COLOMBE   f   French
French feminine form of COLUMBA.
CONSTANCE   f   English, French
Medieval form of CONSTANTIA. The Normans introduced this name to England (it was the name of a daughter of William the Conqueror).
CORALIE   f   French
Either a French form of KORALIA, or a derivative of Latin corallium "coral" (see CORAL).
CORINNE   f   French, English
French form of CORINNA. The French-Swiss author Madame de Staël used it for her novel 'Corinne' (1807).
CORNÉLIE   f   French
French form of CORNELIA.
COSETTE   f   French, Literature
From French chosette meaning "little thing". This is the nickname of the illegitimate daughter of Fantine in Victor Hugo's novel 'Les Misérables' (1862). Her real name is Euphrasie, though it is seldom used. In the novel young Cosette is the ward of the cruel Thénardiers until she is retrieved by Jean Valjean.
CUNÉGONDE   f   French
French form of KUNIGUNDE. Voltaire used this name in his novel 'Candide' (1759).
CYRIELLE   f   French
French feminine form of CYRIL.
CYRILLE   m & f   French
French form of CYRIL, sometimes used as a feminine form.
DANIÈLE   f   French
French feminine form of DANIEL.
DANIELLE   f   French, English
French feminine form of DANIEL. It has been commonly used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.
DAPHNÉ   f   French
French form of DAPHNE.
DÉBORA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, French
Spanish, Portuguese and French form of DEBORAH.
DÉLIA   f   Portuguese, French, Hungarian
Portuguese, French and Hungarian form of DELIA (1).
DELPHINE   f   French
French form of DELPHINA.
DENISE   f   French, English, Dutch
French feminine form of DENIS.
DÉSIRÉE   f   French
French form of DESIDERATA. In part it is directly from the French word meaning "desired, wished".
DIANE   f   French, English
French form of DIANA, also regularly used in the English-speaking world.
DIANNE   f   French, English
Variant of DIANE.
DIEUDONNÉE   f   French
Feminine form of DIEUDONNÉ.
DOMINIQUE   f & m   French
French feminine and masculine form of DOMINIC.
DOMITILLE   f   French
French form of DOMITILLA.
DONATIENNE   f   French
French feminine form of DONATIANUS.
DORIANE   f   French
French feminine form of DORIAN.
DOROTHÉE   f   French
French form of DOROTHEA.
ÉDITH   f   French
French form of EDITH.
EDMÉE   f   French (Rare)
Feminine form of EDMÉ.
EDWIGE   f   French
French form of HEDWIG.
ELÉONORE   f   French
French form of ELEANOR.
ÉLIANE   f   French
Probably from Aeliana, the feminine form of the Roman name Aelianus, which was derived from the Roman family name AELIUS. This was the name of an early saint and martyr.
ÉLISABETH   f   French
French form of ELIZABETH.
ÉLISE   f   French
French short form of ÉLISABETH.
ÉLODIE   f   French
French form of ALODIA.
ÉLOÏSE   f   French
French form of ELOISE.
ELVIRE   f   French
French form of ELVIRA.
ELWIRA   f   French
Polish form of ELVIRA.
ÉMELINE   f   French
French form of Amelina (see EMMELINE).
ÉMILIE   f   French
French feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
ÉMILIENNE   f   French
French feminine form of Aemilianus (see EMILIANO).
EMMA   f   English, French, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.... [more]
EMMANUELLE   f   French
French feminine form of EMMANUEL.
ERNESTINE   f   French, German, English
Feminine form of ERNEST.
ESTELLE   f   English, French
From an Old French name which was derived from Latin stella, meaning "star". It was rare in the English-speaking world in the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century, perhaps due to the character Estella Havisham in Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations' (1860).
ESTHER   f   English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.... [more]
ÉTIENNETTE   f   French
French feminine form of STEPHEN.
EUGÉNIE   f   French
French form of EUGENIA. This was the name of the wife of Napoleon III.
EULALIE   f   French
French form of EULALIA.
EUPHRASIE   f   French
French form of EUPHRASIA.
ÈVE   f   French
French form of EVE.
EVE   f   English, French, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַוָּה (Chawwah), which was derived from the Hebrew word חוה (chawah) "to breathe" or the related word חיה (chayah) "to live". According to the Old Testament Book of Genesis, Eve and Adam were the first humans. God created her from one of Adam's ribs to be his companion. At the urging of a serpent she ate the forbidden fruit and shared some with Adam, causing their expulsion from the Garden of Eden.... [more]
EVELINE   f   English, French, Dutch
Variant of EVELINA.
ÉVELYNE   f   French
French form of EVELINA.
FABIENNE   f   French
French feminine form of Fabianus (see FABIAN).
FANNY   f   English, French, Spanish
Diminutive of FRANCES. In the English-speaking world this has been a vulgar slang word since the late 19th century, and the name has subsequently dropped out of common use.
FAUSTINE   f   French
French feminine form of Faustinus (see FAUSTINO).
FÉLICIE   f   French
French form of FELICIA.
FÉLICIENNE   f   French
French feminine form of Felicianus (see FELICIANO).
FÉLICITÉ   f   French
French form of FELICITAS.
FERNANDE   f   French
French feminine form of FERDINAND.
FIFI   f   French
Diminutive of JOSÉPHINE.
FLAVIE   f   French
French feminine form of FLAVIUS.
FLAVIENNE   f   French
French feminine form of FLAVIAN.
FLEUR   f   French, Dutch, English (Rare)
Means "flower" in French. This was the name of a character in John Galsworthy's novels 'The Forsyte Saga' (1922).
FLORE   f   French
French form of FLORA.
FLORENCE   f & m   English, French
From the Latin name Florentius or the feminine form Florentia, which were derived from florens "prosperous, flourishing". Florentius was borne by many early Christian saints, and it was occasionally used in their honour through the Middle Ages. In modern times it is mostly feminine.... [more]
FLORENTINE   f   French
French form of FLORENTINA.
FLORETTE   f   French (Rare)
French diminutive of FLORA.
FLORIANE   f   French
French feminine form of FLORIAN.
FLORIANNE   f   French
Variant of FLORIANE.
FLORINE   f   French
French feminine form of FLORINUS.
FRANCE   f   French
From the name of the country, sometimes considered a feminine form of FRANK (1) or short form of FRANÇOISE, both of which are ultimately related to the name of the country.
FRANCETTE   f   French
Feminine diminutive of FRANÇOIS.
FRANCINE   f   French, English
Feminine diminutive of FRANÇOIS.
FRANCIS   m & f   English, French
English form of the Late Latin name Franciscus which meant "Frenchman", ultimately from the Germanic tribe of the Franks, who were named for a type of spear that they used. This name was borne by the 13th-century Saint Francis of Assisi, who was originally named Giovanni but was given the nickname Francesco by his father, an admirer of the French. Francis went on to renounce his father's wealth and devote his life to the poor, founding the Franciscan order of friars. Later in his life he apparently received the stigmata.... [more]
FRANÇOISE   f   French
Feminine form of FRANÇOIS.
FRAÑSEZA   f   Breton
Breton feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRÉDÉRIQUE   f   French
French form of FREDERICA.
GABRIELLE   f   French, English
French feminine form of GABRIEL. This was the real name of French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971).
GAËLLE   f   French, Breton
Feminine form of GAËL.
GAETANE   f   French
French feminine form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
GENEVIÈVE   f   French
From the medieval name Genovefa, which is of uncertain origin. It could be derived from the Germanic elements kuni "kin, family" and wefa "wife, woman". Alternatively it could be of Gaulish origin, from the related Celtic element genos "kin, family" combined with a second element of unknown meaning. This name was borne by Saint Geneviève, the patron saint of Paris, who inspired the city to resist the Huns in the 5th century.
GEORGETTE   f   French
French feminine form of GEORGE.
GEORGINE   f   French
French feminine form of GEORGE.
GÉRALDINE   f   French
French feminine form of GERALD.
GERMAINE   f   French
French feminine form of GERMAIN. Saint Germaine was a 16th-century peasant girl from France.
GERVAISE   f   French (Rare)
French feminine form of GERVASIUS.
GHISLAINE   f   French
Feminine form of GHISLAIN.
GHYSLAINE   f   French
Variant of GHISLAINE.
GIGI   f   French
French diminutive of GEORGINE or VIRGINIE.
GILBERTE   f   French
French feminine form of GILBERT.
GINETTE   f   French
Diminutive of GENEVIÈVE.
GISÈLE   f   French
French form of GISELLE.
GISELLE   f   French, English (Modern)
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage" or "pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court. It was borne by a daughter of the French king Charles III who married the Norman leader Rollo in the 10th century. The name was popular in France during the Middle Ages (the more common French form is Gisèle). Though it became known in the English-speaking world due to Adolphe Adam's ballet 'Giselle' (1841), it was not regularly used until the 20th century.
GUENIÈVRE   f   French
French form of GUINEVERE.
GWENAËLLE   f   French, Breton
Feminine form of GWENAËL.
HANNAH   f   English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour" or "grace". In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.... [more]
HAYDÉE   f   Spanish, French
Spanish and French form of HAIDEE, from Byron's 'Don Juan' (1819). It was later used by Alexander Dumas for a character in 'The Count of Monte Cristo' (1844).
HÉLÈNE   f   French
French form of HELEN.
HÉLOÏSE   f   French
French form of ELOISE.
HENRIETTE   f   French, German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
French feminine diminutive of HENRY.
HERMINE   f   German, French
German feminine form of HERMAN.
HONORINE   f   French
French form of Honorina, a feminine form of the Roman name Honorinus, a derivative of HONORIUS. Saint Honorina was a 4th-century martyr from the Normandy region in France.
HORTENSE   f   French, English
French form of HORTENSIA.
HUGUETTE   f   French
Feminine form of HUGUES.
HYACINTHE   m & f   French
French masculine and feminine form of HYACINTHUS.
INÈS   f   French
French form of INÉS.
IRÈNE   f   French
French form of IRENE.
IRIS   f   Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the name of the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
ISABEL   f   Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German
Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.... [more]
ISABELLE   f   French, English, German, Dutch
French form of ISABEL.
ISAURE   f   French
French form of ISAURA.
JACINTHE   f   French
French cognate of HYACINTH (2).
JACQUELINE   f   French, English
French feminine form of JACQUES, also commonly used in the English-speaking world.
JACQUETTE   f   French (Rare)
Feminine diminutive of JACQUES.
JADE   f   English, French
From the name of the precious stone that is often used in carvings. It is derived from Spanish (piedra de la) ijada meaning "(stone of the) flank", relating to the belief that jade could cure renal colic. As a given name, it came into general use during the 1970s.
JANINE   f   French, English, Dutch, German
Variant of JEANNINE. It has only been in use since the 20th century.
JASMINE   f   English, French
From the English word for the climbing plant with fragrant flowers which is used for making perfumes. It is derived from Persian یاسمن (yasamen) (which is also a Persian name).
JEANINE   f   French, English, Dutch
Variant of JEANNINE.
JEANNE   f   French, English
Modern French form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). Joan of Arc is known as Jeanne d'Arc in France.
JEANNETTE   f   French, English, Dutch
French diminutive of JEANNE.
JEANNINE   f   French, English
Diminutive of JEANNE.
JESSICA   f   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
This name was first used in this form by Shakespeare in his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596), where it belongs to the daughter of Shylock. Shakespeare probably based it on the biblical name ISCAH, which would have been spelled Jescha in his time. It was not commonly used as a given name until the middle of the 20th century. Notable bearers include actresses Jessica Tandy (1909-1994) and Jessica Lange (1949-).
JOANNE   f   English, French
Variant of JOAN (1) or JOHANNE.
JOCELINE   f   French
French feminine form of Joscelin (see JOCELYN).
JOCELYN   f & m   English, French
From a Germanic masculine name, variously written as Gaudelenus, Gautselin, Gauzlin, along with many other spellings. It was derived from the Germanic element Gaut, which was from the name of the Germanic tribe the Gauts, combined with a Latin diminutive suffix. The Normans brought this name to England in the form Goscelin or Joscelin, and it was common until the 14th century. It was revived in the 20th century primarily as a feminine name, perhaps an adaptation of the surname Jocelyn (a medieval derivative of the given name). In France this is a masculine name only.
JOCELYNE   f   French
French feminine form of Joscelin (see JOCELYN).
JOËLLE   f   French
French feminine form of JOEL.
JOHANNE   f   French, Danish, Norwegian, Medieval French
French, Danish and Norwegian form of Iohanna (see JOANNA).
JOSÉE   f   French
French feminine form of JOSEPH.
JOSÈPHE   f   French
French feminine form of JOSEPH.
JOSÉPHINE   f   French
French feminine form of JOSEPH. A notable bearer of this name was the first wife of Napoleon Bonaparte, Joséphine de Beauharnais (1763-1814).
JOSETTE   f   French
Diminutive of JOSÉPHINE.
JOSIANE   f   French
Diminutive of JOSÉPHINE.
JOSSELINE   f   French
French feminine variant of JOCELYN.
JUDITH   f   English, Jewish, French, German, Spanish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדִית (Yehudit) meaning "woman from Judea", Judea being an ancient region in Israel. In the Old Testament Judith is one of the Hittite wives of Esau. This is also the name of the main character of the apocryphal Book of Judith. She killed Holofernes, an invading Assyrian commander, by beheading him in his sleep.... [more]
JULIANE   f   French, German
French and German feminine form of JULIAN.
JULIE   f   French, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, English, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Danish, Norwegian and Czech form of JULIA. It has spread to many other regions as well. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the early 20th century.
JULIENNE   f   French
French feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN).
JULIETTE   f   French
French diminutive of JULIE.
JUSTINE   f   French, English, Dutch, German
French feminine form of Iustinus (see JUSTIN). This is the name of the heroine in the novel 'Justine' (1791) by the Marquis de Sade.
KARINE (1)   f   French
French form of CARINA (1). It can also function as a short form of CATHERINE, via Swedish Karin.
KATARIN   f   Breton
Breton form of KATHERINE.
KATELL   f   Breton
Breton form of KATHERINE.
LAETITIA   f   Late Roman, French
Original form of LETITIA, as well as the French form.
LARA (1)   f   Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Russian short form of LARISA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel 'Doctor Zhivago' (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965).
LAURE   f   French
French form of LAURA.
LAURENCE (2)   f   French
French feminine form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LAURENTINE   f   French
Feminine form of LAURENTIN.
LAURETTE   f   French
French diminutive of LAURA.
LAURINE   f   French
Diminutive of LAURE.
LÉA   f   French
French form of LEAH.
LÉONE   f   French
French feminine form of LEON.
LÉONIDE   m & f   French
French masculine and feminine form of LEONIDAS.
LÉONIE   f   French
French feminine form of LEONIUS.
LÉONNE   f   French
Feminine form of LÉON.
LÉONTINE   f   French
French form of LEONTINA.
LÉOPOLDINE   f   French
French feminine form of LEOPOLD.
LILI   f   German, French, Hungarian
German, French and Hungarian diminutive of ELISABETH, also sometimes connected to the German word lilie meaning "lily". In Hungarian, it can also be diminutive of KAROLINA or JÚLIA.
LILIAN   f & m   English, French
English variant of LILLIAN, as well as a French masculine form.
LILIANE   f   French
French form of LILLIAN.
LILIANNE   f   French (Rare)
Variant of LILIANE.
LILOU   f   French
Either a diminutive of French names containing the sound lee or a combination of LILI and LOUISE.
LINDA   f   English, Dutch, German, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element linde meaning "soft, tender". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful".
LINE   f   Danish, Norwegian, French
Short form of CAROLINE and other names ending in line.
LISETTE   f   French, English
Diminutive of ÉLISABETH.
LIVIE   f   French, Czech
French and Czech feminine form of LIVIUS.
LOANE   f   French
Feminine form of ELOUAN.
LORETTE   f   French
Variant of LAURETTE.
LOU   f & m   English, French
Short form of LOUISE or LOUIS. Famous bearers include the baseball player Lou Gehrig (1903-1941) and the musician Lou Reed (1942-2013).
LOUANE   f   French
Combination of LOU and ANNE (1).
LOUISE   f   French, English, Danish, Swedish, Dutch
French feminine form of LOUIS.
LOUISETTE   f   French
Diminutive of LOUISE.
LOUNA   f   French (Modern)
Possibly a variant of LUNA.
LUCE   f   Italian, French
Italian and French variant of LUCIA. This also means "light" in Italian.
LUCETTE   f   French
Diminutive of LUCIE.
LUCIE   f   French, Czech
French and Czech form of LUCIA.
LUCIENNE   f   French
Feminine form of LUCIEN.
LUCILE   f   French, English
Variant of LUCILLE.
LUCILLE   f   French, English
French form of LUCILLA. A famous bearer was American comedienne Lucille Ball (1911-1989).
LUCINDE   f   French
French form of LUCINDA.
LUCRÈCE   f & m   French
French form of both LUCRETIA and its masculine form Lucretius.
LUDIVINE   f   French
Possibly from a feminine form of LEUTWIN. It was popularized in the 1970s by a character from the television miniseries 'Les Gens de Mogador'.
LYDIE   f   French
French form of LYDIA.
LYLOU   f   French
Variant of LILOU.
MADELEINE   f   French, English, Swedish
French form of MAGDALENE.
MADELINE   f   English, French
English form of MAGDALENE. This is the name of the heroine in a series of children's books by Ludwig Bemelmans, first published 1939.
MAELA   f   Breton
Feminine form of MAËL.
MAËLLE   f   French, Breton
French feminine form of MAËL.
MAËLYS   f   French
Feminine form of MAËL, possibly influenced by the spelling of MAILYS.
MAEVA   f   Tahitian, French
Means "welcome" in Tahitian.
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