Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is feminine; and the usage is German.
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ABIGAIL   f   English, German, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name אֲבִיגָיִל ('Avigayil) meaning "my father is joy". In the Old Testament this is the name of Nabal's wife. After Nabal's death she became the third wife of King David.... [more]
ADA   f   English, German, Polish, Hungarian, Italian, Finnish
Short form of ADELAIDE and other names beginning with the same sound. This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.
ADELHEID   f   German, Dutch
German and Dutch form of ADELAIDE.
AGNES   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.
ALBERTA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, German
Feminine form of ALBERT. This is the name of a Canadian province, which was named in honour of a daughter of Queen Victoria.
ALBERTINA   f   Italian, German, Dutch, Portuguese
Feminine diminutive of ALBERT.
ALBINA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Polish, German, Lithuanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of ALBINUS. Saint Albina was a 3rd-century martyr from Caesarea.
ALBINE   f   French, German
French form and German variant of ALBINA.
ALENA   f   German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene
Short form of MAGDALENA or HELENA.
ALEX   m & f   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXANDRA   f   English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALEXANDRINE   f   French, German
French and German elaborated form of ALEXANDRA. This was the name of a Danish queen, the wife of King Christian X.
ALEXIS   m & f   German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
ALFREDA   f   Polish, German, Italian, English
Feminine form of ALFRED.
ALIDA   f   Dutch, German, Hungarian
Diminutive of ADELAIDE.
ALINA   f   Romanian, German, Italian, Polish
Short form of ADELINA and names that end in alina.
ALOISIA   f   German
German feminine form of ALOYSIUS.
AMALIA   f   Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".
AMALIE   f   German
German variant of AMALIA.
AMANDA   f   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Late Roman
In part this is a feminine form of AMANDUS. However, it was not used during the Middle Ages. In the 17th century it was recreated by authors and poets who based it directly on Latin amanda "lovable, worthy of love". Notably, the playwright Colley Cibber used it for a character in his play 'Love's Last Shift' (1696). It came into regular use during the 19th century.
AMELIA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.
AMELIE   f   German
German variant of AMELIA.
ANDREA (2)   f   English, German, Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Dutch, Croatian, Serbian
Feminine form of ANDREW. As an English name, it has been used since the 17th century, though it was not common until the 20th century.
ANELIE   f   German
Short form of ANNELIESE.
ANGELA   f   English, Italian, German, Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Slovak, Russian, Macedonian, Late Roman
Feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL). As an English name, it came into use in the 18th century.
ANGELIKA   f   German, Polish, Slovak, Czech
Cognate of ANGELICA.
ANGELINA   f   Italian, English, Russian, German, Dutch, Polish, Spanish, Macedonian
Latinate diminutive of ANGELA. A famous bearer is American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-).
ANIKA (1)   f   German, Dutch, Danish, Slovene
German, Dutch, Danish and Slovene diminutive of ANNA or ANA.
ANINA   f   German
Diminutive of ANNA.
ANITA (1)   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Latvian
Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of ANA.
ANKE   f   Low German, Dutch
Low German and Dutch diminutive of ANNA and other names beginning with An.
ANNA   f   English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.... [more]
ANNALENA   f   German
Combination of ANNA and LENA.
ANNE (1)   f   French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Basque
French form of ANNA. In the 13th-century it was imported to England, where it was also commonly spelled Ann. The name was borne by a 17th-century English queen and also by the second wife of Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn (the mother of Queen Elizabeth I), who was eventually beheaded in the Tower of London. This is also the name of the heroine in 'Anne of Green Gables' (1908) by Canadian author L. M. Montgomery.
ANNEGRET   f   German
Combination of ANNA and GRETE.
ANNELIE   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of ANNELIESE.
ANNELIES   f   German, Dutch
Variant of ANNELIESE.
ANNELIESE   f   German, Dutch
Combination of ANNA and LIESE.
ANNEMARIE   f   Dutch, German
Combination of ANNA and MARIE.
ANNETT   f   German
German variant of ANNETTE.
ANNETTE   f   French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch
French diminutive of ANNE (1). It has also been widely used in the English-speaking world, and it became popular in America in the late 1950s due to the fame of actress Annette Funicello (1942-).
ANNIKA   f   Swedish, Dutch, Finnish, German, English (Modern)
Swedish diminutive of ANNA.
ANSELMA   f   German, Italian, Spanish
Feminine form of ANSELM.
ANTJE   f   Frisian, Dutch, Low German
Frisian, Dutch and Low German diminutive of ANNA.
ARIANE   f   French, German, Dutch
French form of ARIADNE.
ASTRID   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, French
Modern form of ÁSTRÍÐR. This name was borne by the Swedish writer Astrid Lindgren (1907-2002), the author of 'Pippi Longstocking'.
AUGUSTA   f   German, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AUGUSTUS. It was introduced to Britain when king George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
AUGUSTE (2)   f   German
German form of AUGUSTA.
AUGUSTINE (2)   f   French, German
French feminine form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AURORA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
AVA (3)   f   German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". This was the name of a 9th-century Frankish saint. It was also borne by a 12th-century poet from Melk, Austria.
BARBARA   f   English, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.
BÄRBEL   f   German
German diminutive of BARBARA.
BEATA   f   Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Derived from Latin beatus meaning "blessed". This was the name of a few minor saints.
BEATE   f   German
German form of BEATA.
BEATRIX   f   German, Hungarian, Dutch, English (Rare), Late Roman
Probably from Viatrix, a feminine form of the Late Latin name Viator which meant "voyager, traveller". It was a common name amongst early Christians, and the spelling was altered by association with Latin beatus "blessed". Viatrix or Beatrix was a 4th-century saint who was strangled to death during the persecutions of Diocletian.... [more]
BENEDIKTA   f   German
German feminine form of BENEDICT.
BERTHA   f   German, English, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element beraht meaning "bright, famous". It was borne by the mother of Charlemagne in the 8th century, and it was popularized in England by the Normans. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century. The name also appears in southern Germanic legends (often spelled Perchta or Berchta) belonging to a goddess of animals and weaving.
BETTINA (1)   f   German
Diminutive of ELISABETH.
BIANKA   f   German, Hungarian, Polish
German, Hungarian and Polish form of BIANCA.
BIRGIT   f   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German
Scandinavian variant of BIRGITTA.
BRIGITTA   f   German, Dutch, Hungarian
German, Dutch and Hungarian form of BRIDGET.
BRIGITTE   f   German, French
German and French form of BRIDGET.
BRÜNHILD   f   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements brun "armour, protection" and hild "battle". It is cognate with the Old Norse name Brynhildr (from the elements bryn and hildr). In Norse legend Brynhildr was the queen of the Valkyries who was rescued by the hero Sigurd. In the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied' she was a queen of Iceland and the wife of Günther. Both of these characters were probably inspired by the eventful life of the 6th-century Frankish queen Brunhilda (of Visigothic birth).
CÄCILIA   f   German
German form of CECILIA.
CÄCILIE   f   German
German form of CECILIA.
CAECILIA   f   German, Ancient Roman
German form of CECILIA, as well as the original Latin form.
CAMILLA   f   English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the 'Aeneid'. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel 'Camilla' (1796).
CARINA (1)   f   English, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Late Latin name derived from cara meaning "dear, beloved". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr. It is also the name of a constellation in the southern sky, though in this case it means "keel" in Latin, referring to a part of Jason's ship the Argo.
CAROLA   f   Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish
Feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLIN   f   German
German feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine form of CAROLUS.
CASSANDRA   f   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.... [more]
CATHRIN   f   German
German short form of KATHARINA.
CATRIN   f   Welsh, German
Welsh form of KATHERINE, as well as a German short form of KATHARINA.
CECILIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish, Dutch, German
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.... [more]
CHARLOTTE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French feminine diminutive of CHARLES. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century. A notable bearer was Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855), the eldest of the three Brontë sisters and the author of 'Jane Eyre' and 'Villette'.
CHRISTA   f   German, Danish, English
Short form of CHRISTINA.
CHRISTEL   f   German
German diminutive of CHRISTINE.
CHRISTIANE   f   German, French
German and French feminine form of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTINA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From Christiana, the Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN. This was the name of an early, possibly legendary, saint who was tormented by her pagan father. It was also borne by a 17th-century Swedish queen and patron the arts who gave up her crown in order to become a Roman Catholic.
CHRISTINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
French form of CHRISTINA, as well as a variant in other languages.
CLARA   f   Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CLAUDIA   f   English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
CONSTANZE   f   German
German form of CONSTANTIA.
CORA   f   English, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of KORE. It was not used as a given name in the English-speaking world until after it was employed by James Fenimore Cooper for a character in his novel 'The Last of the Mohicans' (1826). In some cases it may be a short form of CORDULA, CORINNA or other names beginning with a similar sound.
CORDULA   f   German
Late Latin name meaning "heart" from Latin cor, cordis. Saint Cordula was one of the 4th-century companions of Saint Ursula.
CORINA   f   English, German, Romanian
Variant of CORINNA.
CORINNA   f   English, German, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Κοριννα (Korinna), which was derived from κορη (kore) "maiden". This was the name of a Greek lyric poet of the 5th century BC. The Roman poet Ovid used it for the main female character in his book 'Amores'. In the modern era it has been in use since the 17th century, when Robert Herrick used it in his poem 'Corinna's going a-Maying'.
CORNELIA   f   German, Romanian, Italian, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CORNELIUS. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana (the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus), the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi. After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century.
CRESCENTIA   f   German, Late Roman
Feminine form of CRESCENTIUS.
DAGMAR   f   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, Czech, Slovak, Finnish
From the Old Norse name Dagmær, derived from the elements dagr "day" and mær "maid". This was the name adopted by the popular Bohemian wife of the Danish king Valdemar II when they married in 1205. Her birth name was Markéta.
DANA (1)   f   Romanian, Czech, Slovak, German, Hebrew
Feminine form of DANIEL or DAN (1).
DEBORA   f   Italian, German, Dutch
Italian, German and Dutch form of DEBORAH.
DIANA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Roman Mythology
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.... [more]
DIETLINDE   f   German
From the Germanic name Theudelinda, derived from the elements theud "people" and linde "soft, tender". Theudelinda was a 6th-century queen of the Lombards.
DORIS   f   English, German, Croatian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
From the ancient Greek name Δωρις (Doris) which meant "Dorian woman". The Dorians were a Greek tribe who occupied the Peloponnese starting in the 12th century BC. In Greek mythology Doris was a sea nymph, one of the many children of Oceanus and Tethys. It began to be used as an English name in the 19th century. A famous bearer is the American actress Doris Day (1924-).
DOROTHEA   f   German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, English, Late Greek
Feminine form of the Late Greek name Δωροθεος (Dorotheos), which meant "gift of God" from Greek δωρον (doron) "gift" and θεος (theos) "god". Dorothea was the name of two early saints, notably the 4th-century martyr Dorothea of Caesarea. It was also borne by the 14th-century Saint Dorothea of Montau, who was the patron saint of Prussia.
DÖRTHE   f   Low German
Low German form of DORTHE.
EBBA (1)   f   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, German (Rare)
Feminine form of EBBE.
EDITH   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
ELENA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Russian, German, Medieval Slavic
Cognate of HELEN, and a variant transcription of Russian YELENA.
ELEONORE   f   German
German form of ELEANOR.
ELFRIEDE   f   German
German form of ELFREDA.
ELISABETH   f   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
German and Dutch form of ELIZABETH. It is also a variant English form, reflecting the spelling used in the Authorized Version of the New Testament.
ELKE (1)   f   Dutch, German, Frisian
Frisian diminutive of ADELHEID.
ELLI (1)   f   German
German diminutive of ELIZABETH.
ELMA   f   Dutch, German
Short form of WILHELMINE or names ending in elma, such as ANSELMA.
ELSE   f   Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch
Short form of ELISABETH.
ELVIRA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Russian
Spanish form of a Visigothic name, possibly composed of the Germanic elements ala "all" and wer "true". This is the name of a character in Mozart's opera 'Don Giovanni' (1787).
EMILIE   f   German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
German and Scandinavian feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMMA   f   English, French, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.... [more]
ERIKA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, English, Italian
Feminine form of ERIK. It also coincides with the word for "heather" in some languages.
ERMENTRUD   f   German (Archaic)
German form of ERMENDRUD.
ERNA (1)   f   German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Feminine form of ERNEST.
ERNESTINE   f   French, German, English
Feminine form of ERNEST.
ESTHER   f   English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.... [more]
EVA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant transcription of Russian YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.
EVELIN   f   German, Estonian, Hungarian
German, Estonian and Hungarian form of EVELINA.
EVELYN   f & m   English, German
From an English surname which was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
FELICIE   f   German
German form of FELICIA.
FELICITAS   f   German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Latin name which meant "good luck, fortune". In Roman mythology the goddess Felicitas was the personification of good luck. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint, a slave martyred with her master Perpetua in Carthage.
FELIZITAS   f   German
German variant of FELICITAS.
FERDINANDA   f   Italian, German
Feminine form of FERDINAND.
FLORA   f   English, German, Italian, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
FLORETTA   f   English, German (Rare)
Latinate diminutive of FLORA.
FRANKA (1)   f   German, Dutch
German and Dutch feminine form of FRANK (1).
FRÄNZE   f   German
Diminutive of FRANZISKA.
FRANZI   f   German
Short form of FRANZISKA.
FRANZISKA   f   German
German feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRAUKE   f   German
Means "little lady", derived from German frau combined with a diminutive suffix.
FREJA   f   Danish, Swedish, German
Danish, Swedish and German form of FREYA.
FRIEDA   f   German, English
Variant of FRIDA.
FRIEDE   f   German
Short form of names containing the element fried, derived from the Germanic element frid meaning "peace".
FRIEDERIKE   f   German
German feminine form of FREDERICK.
FRITZI   f   German
German diminutive of FRIEDERIKE.
GABI   f & m   German, Romanian, Hungarian
German diminutive of GABRIELE (2) (feminine), Romanian diminutive of GABRIEL (masculine) or GABRIELA (feminine), and Hungarian diminutive of GÁBOR (masculine) or GABRIELLA (feminine).
GABRIELE (2)   f   German
German feminine form of GABRIEL.
GEORGINA   f   English, Dutch, German, Spanish
Feminine form of GEORGE.
GERDA (1)   f   German, Dutch
Feminine form of GERD (1).
GERHILD   f   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and hild "battle".
GERLINDE   f   German, Dutch
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with linde "soft, tender".
GERTRAUD   f   German
German form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUD   f   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of GERTRUDE.
GISA   f   German
German short form of GISELLE.
GISELA   f   German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
German, Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese form of GISELLE.
GITTA   f   German
German short form of BRIGITTA.
GLORIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Polish
Means "glory" in Latin. The name (first?) appeared in E. D. E. N. Southworth's novel 'Gloria' (1891) and subsequently in George Bernard Shaw's play 'You Never Can Tell' (1898). It was popularized in the early 20th century by American actress Gloria Swanson (1899-1983). Another famous bearer is feminist Gloria Steinem (1934-).
GRATIA   f   German
Means "grace" in Latin.
GRETA   f   Swedish, German, English
Short form of MARGARETA. A famous bearer of this name was Swedish actress Greta Garbo (1905-1990).
GRETCHEN   f   German, English
German diminutive of MARGARETA.
GRETE   f   German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian short form of MARGARET.
GRETEL   f   German
Diminutive of GRETE. This name is well-known as the character in Grimm's fairy tale who is captured, with her brother Hansel, by a witch.
GUDRUN   f   Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Guðrún meaning "god's secret lore", derived from the elements guð "god" and rún "secret lore". In Norse legend Gudrun was the wife of Sigurd. After his death she married Atli, but when he murdered her brothers, she killed her sons by him, fed him their hearts, and then slew him.
GUNDA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names containing the Germanic element gund which means "war".
GUNDULA   f   German
Elaborated form of GUNDA.
HANNAH   f   English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour" or "grace". In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.... [more]
HANNE (1)   f & m   Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch
Danish and Norwegian short form of JOHANNE, or a German and Dutch short form of JOHANNA. This can also be a Dutch short form of JOHANNES (masculine).
HANNELORE   f   German
Combination of HANNE (1) and ELEONORE.
HEDWIG   f   German
From the Germanic name Hadewig, derived from the Germanic elements hadu "battle, combat" and wig "war". This was the name of a 13th-century German saint, the wife of the Polish duke Henry the Bearded. It was subsequently borne by a 14th-century Polish queen (usually known by her Polish name Jadwiga) who is now also regarded as a saint.
HEDY   f   German, Dutch
Diminutive of HEDWIG and other Germanic names beginning with the element hadu meaning "battle, combat".
HEIDA   f   German
German diminutive of ADELHEID.
HEIDI   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English
German diminutive of ADELHEID. This is the name of the title character in the children's novel 'Heidi' (1880) by Johanna Spyri. The name began to be used in the English-speaking world shortly after the 1937 release of the movie adaptation, which starred Shirley Temple.
HEIDRUN   f   Norse Mythology, German
Derived from Old Norse heiðr meaning "bright, clear" and rún meaning "secret". In Norse mythology this was the name of a goat that would eat the leaves from the tree of life and produce mead in her udder.
HEIKE   f & m   Low German, Frisian, Dutch
Low German diminutive of HENRIKE or HEINRICH.
HEILWIG   f   German
Derived from the Germanic elements heil "happy, hearty, healthy" and wig "war".
HEINRIKE   f   German
Feminine form of HEINRICH.
HELENE   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of HELEN, as well as the modern Scandinavian and German form.
HELLA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Variant of HELGA.
HELMA   f   German, Dutch
Short form of WILHELMINA.
HELMINE   f   German
Short form of WILHELMINE.
HENRIETTE   f   French, German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
French feminine diminutive of HENRY.
HENRIKE   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian feminine form of HENRY.
HERMINE   f   German, French
German feminine form of HERMAN.
HERTA   f   German
Variant of HERTHA.
HERTHA   f   German
Form of NERTHUS. The spelling change from N to H resulted from a misreading of Tacitus's text.
HILDA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HILDE   f   German, Dutch, Norwegian
German, Dutch and Norwegian variant of HILDA.
HILDEGARD   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and gard "enclosure". Saint Hildegard was a 12th-century mystic from Bingen in Germany who was famous for her writings and poetry and also for her prophetic visions.
HILTRAUD   f   German
Means "strength in battle", derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and thrud "strength".
HILTRUD   f   German
Variant of HILTRAUD.
HULDA (1)   f   Icelandic, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse hulda meaning "hiding, secrecy". This was the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology. As a modern name, it can also derive from archaic Swedish huld meaning "sweet, lovable".
IDA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'The Princess' (1847), which was later adapted into the play 'Princess Ida' (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.... [more]
ILONA   f   Hungarian, German, Finnish, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Hungarian form of HELEN.
ILSA   f   German
Variant of ILSE.
ILSE   f   German, Dutch
German and Dutch diminutive of ELISABETH.
IMKE   f   Frisian, Dutch, German
Diminutive of IME (2).
INA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Limburgish, Croatian
Short form of names ending with ina.
INGE   f & m   Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Dutch
Short form of Scandinavian and German names beginning with the element ing, which refers to the Germanic god ING. In Sweden and Norway this is primarily a masculine name, elsewhere it is usually feminine.
INGEBORG   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingibjörg, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with björg meaning "help, save, rescue".
INGEBURG   f   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of INGEBORG.
INGRID   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).
INKA   f   Frisian, Finnish, German
Frisian and Finnish feminine form of INGE, and a German variant.
IRENE   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ειρηνη (Eirene), derived from a word meaning "peace". This was the name of the Greek goddess who personified peace, one of the ‘Ωραι (Horai). It was also borne by several early Christian saints. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, notably being borne by an 8th-century empress, who was the first woman to lead the empire. She originally served as regent for her son, but later had him killed and ruled alone.... [more]
IRIS   f   Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish
Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow. This name can also be given in reference to the word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the name of the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.
IRMA   f   German, English, Dutch, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Lithuanian, Hungarian (Rare), Ancient Germanic
German short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ermen, which meant "whole, universal". It is thus related to EMMA. It began to be regularly used in the English-speaking world in the 19th century.
IRMENTRUD   f   German (Archaic)
German form of ERMENDRUD.
IRMGARD   f   German
Contracted form of IRMINGARD.
IRMHILD   f   German
Derived from the Germanic elements ermen "whole, universal" and hild "battle".
IRMINGARD   f   German
Derived from the Germanic elements ermen meaning "whole, universal" and gard meaning "enclosure".
IRMTRAUD   f   German
Contracted form of IRMENTRUD.
IRMTRUD   f   German
Variant of IRMTRAUD.
ISA (2)   f   German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish
Short form of ISABELLA.
ISABEL   f   Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German
Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.... [more]
ISABELL   f   German
German variant of ISABEL.
ISABELLA   f   Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian
Latinate form of ISABEL. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).
ISABELLE   f   French, English, German, Dutch
French form of ISABEL.
ISOLDE   f   English (Rare), German, Arthurian Romance
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, perhaps from a hypothetic name like Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".... [more]
IVONNE   f   Spanish, German, Dutch
Spanish, German and Dutch variant of YVONNE.
JANA (1)   f   Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German, Slovene, Catalan
Feminine form of JAN (1).
JANINA   f   Polish, Finnish, German, Swedish, Lithuanian
Latinate form of JEANNINE.
JANINE   f   French, English, Dutch, German
Variant of JEANNINE. It has only been in use since the 20th century.
JASMIN (1)   f   German, English
German form and English variant of JASMINE.
JENNIFER   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Spanish
From a Cornish form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar (see GUINEVERE). This name has only been common outside of Cornwall since the beginning of the 20th century, after it was featured in George Bernard Shaw's play 'The Doctor's Dilemma' (1906).
JENNY   f   English, Swedish, Finnish, German, Dutch, Spanish
Originally a medieval English diminutive of JANE. Since the middle of the 20th century it has been primarily considered a diminutive of JENNIFER.
JESSICA   f   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
This name was first used in this form by Shakespeare in his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596), where it belongs to the daughter of Shylock. Shakespeare probably based it on the biblical name ISCAH, which would have been spelled Jescha in his time. It was not commonly used as a given name until the middle of the 20th century. Notable bearers include actresses Jessica Tandy (1909-1994) and Jessica Lange (1949-).
JESSIKA   f   German, English (Modern)
German and English variant of JESSICA.
JO   f & m   English, German, Dutch
Short form of JOAN (1), JOANNA, JOSEPHINE, or other names that begin with Jo. It is primarily masculine in German and Dutch, short for JOHANNES or JOSEF.
JOHANNA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Hungarian, Finnish, Estonian, English, Late Roman
Latinate form of Ioanna (see JOANNA).
JÖRDIS   f   German
German form of HJÖRDÍS.
JOSEFINE   f   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, German
Scandinavian and German form of JOSÉPHINE.
JOSEPHA   f   German (Archaic), English (Rare)
Feminine form of JOSEPH.
JOSEPHINE   f   English, German, Dutch
English, German and Dutch form of JOSÉPHINE.
JUDITH   f   English, Jewish, French, German, Spanish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדִית (Yehudit) meaning "woman from Judea", Judea being an ancient region in Israel. In the Old Testament Judith is one of the Hittite wives of Esau. This is also the name of the main character of the apocryphal Book of Judith. She killed Holofernes, an invading Assyrian commander, by beheading him in his sleep.... [more]
JULIA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Roman, Biblical
Feminine form of the Roman family name JULIUS. Among the notable women from this family were Julia Augusta (also known as Livia Drusilla), the wife of Emperor Augustus, and Julia the Elder, the daughter of Augustus and the wife of Tiberius. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was also borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Additionally, Shakespeare used it in his comedy 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).... [more]
JULIANA   f   Dutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.
JULIANE   f   French, German
French and German feminine form of JULIAN.
JULIE   f   French, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, English, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Danish, Norwegian and Czech form of JULIA. It has spread to many other regions as well. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the early 20th century.
JUSTINE   f   French, English, Dutch, German
French feminine form of Iustinus (see JUSTIN). This is the name of the heroine in the novel 'Justine' (1791) by the Marquis de Sade.
JUTTA   f   German
Probably a medieval Low German form of JUDITH. It might also derive from a Germanic name such as JUDDA.
KAREN (1)   f   Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, German, English
Danish short form of KATHERINE. It became common in the English-speaking world after the 1930s.
KARIN   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, English
Swedish short form of KATHERINE.
KARINA   f   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Polish, German, Russian, English
Elaborated form of KARIN.
KARLA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian
German, Scandinavian and Croatian feminine form of CHARLES.
KAROLA   f   Hungarian, German
Hungarian and German feminine form of CAROLUS.
KAROLINE   f   German, Danish, Norwegian
Feminine form of CAROLUS.
KASIMIRA   f   German (Archaic)
Feminine form of KASIMIR.
KATARINE   f   German
German form of KATHERINE.
KATHARINA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German form of KATHERINE.
KATHARINE   f   English, German
English variant of KATHERINE and German variant of KATHARINA. A famous bearer was American actress Katharine Hepburn (1907-2003).
KÄTHE   f   German
German diminutive of KATHERINE.
KATHERINA   f   English (Rare), German
Latinate form of KATHERINE. Shakespeare used this name in his play 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593).
KATHRIN   f   German
German short form of KATHARINA.
KATINKA   f   German, Dutch
German form of KATENKA.
KATJA   f   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Slovene
German, Scandinavian, Dutch and Slovene form of KATYA.
KATRIN   f   German, Swedish, Estonian
German, Swedish and Estonian short form of KATHERINE.
KATRINA   f   English, German, Swedish, Dutch
Variant of CATRIONA. It is also a German, Swedish and Dutch contracted form of KATHERINE.
KERSTIN   f   Swedish, German
Swedish form of CHRISTINA.
KIKI   f   English, German, Greek
Diminutive of names beginning with or containing the sound K.
KINGE   f   German
Diminutive of KUNIGUNDE.
KONSTANZE   f   German
German form of CONSTANTIA.
KORA   f   German
German variant of CORA.
KORNELIA   f   German, Polish
German and Polish form of CORNELIA.
KRESZENTIA   f   German
German feminine form of CRESCENTIUS.
KRESZENZ   f   German
German feminine form of CRESCENTIUS.
KRIEMHILD   f   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements grim "mask" and hild "battle". Kriemhild was a beautiful heroine in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied', where she is the sister of Günther and the wife of Siegfried. After her husband is killed by Hagen with the consent of Günther, Kriemhild tragically exacts her revenge.
KRIEMHILDE   f   German
Variant of KRIEMHILD.
KRIMHILDE   f   German
Variant of KRIEMHILD.
KRISTA   f   German, English, Finnish
Short form of KRISTINA.
KRISTIANE   f   German
German form of CHRISTINA.
KRISTIN   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, English
Scandinavian and German form of CHRISTINA.
KRISTINE   f   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, English, German
Scandinavian form of CHRISTINE, as well as an English and German variant.
KUNIGUNDE   f   German
Derived from the Germanic element kuni "clan, family" combined with gund "war". Saint Kunigunde was the wife of Holy Roman Emperor Henry II.
LARA (1)   f   Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Russian short form of LARISA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel 'Doctor Zhivago' (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965).
LAURA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
LENA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese
Scandinavian, German and Polish short form of HELENA or MAGDALENA, and a Russian short form of YELENA.
LENE   f   German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian short form of HELENE or MAGDALENE.
LENI   f   German
German diminutive of HELENE or MAGDALENA.
LEONA   f   English, German
Feminine form of LEON.
LEONIE   f   German, Dutch
German and Dutch feminine form of LEONIUS.
LEONORE   f   German
German short form of ELEANOR.
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