Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is feminine; and the usage is Italian.
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ADA   f   English, German, Polish, Hungarian, Italian, Finnish
Short form of ADELAIDE and other names beginning with the same sound. This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.
ADELAIDE   f   English, Italian, Portuguese
From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.
AGNESE   f   Italian, Latvian
Italian and Latvian form of AGNES.
AGOSTINA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
ALBA (1)   f   Italian, Spanish, Catalan
This name is derived from two distinct names, ALBA (2) and ALBA (3), with distinct origins, Latin and Germanic. Over time these names have become confused with one another. To further complicate the matter, alba means "dawn" in Italian, Spanish and Catalan. This may be the main inspiration behind its use in Italy and Spain.
ALBERTA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, German
Feminine form of ALBERT. This is the name of a Canadian province, which was named in honour of a daughter of Queen Victoria.
ALBERTINA   f   Italian, German, Dutch, Portuguese
Feminine diminutive of ALBERT.
ALBINA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Polish, German, Lithuanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of ALBINUS. Saint Albina was a 3rd-century martyr from Caesarea.
ALDA (1)   f   Italian, Portuguese, Ancient Germanic
Feminine form of ALDO.
ALE (1)   m & f   Finnish, Italian, Spanish
Finnish short form of ALEKSANTERI or ALEKSI, an Italian short form of ALESSANDRO, and a Spanish short form of ALEJANDRO or ALEJANDRA.
ALESSA   f   Italian
Short form of ALESSANDRA.
ALESSANDRA   f   Italian
Italian form of ALEXANDRA.
ALESSIA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of ALEXIS.
ALEX   m & f   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXANDRA   f   English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALFONSINA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of ALFONSO.
ALFREDA   f   Polish, German, Italian, English
Feminine form of ALFRED.
ALICE   f   English, French, Portuguese, Italian
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).
ALINA   f   Romanian, German, Italian, Polish
Short form of ADELINA and names that end in alina.
ALLEGRA   f   English (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Means "cheerful, lively" in Italian. It is not a traditional Italian name. It was borne by a short-lived illegitimate daughter of Lord Byron.
ALMA (1)   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Dutch
This name became popular after the Battle of Alma (1854), which took place near the River Alma in Crimea and ended in a victory for Britain and France. However, the name was in rare use before the battle; it was probably inspired by Latin almus "nourishing". It also coincides with the Spanish word meaning "the soul".
AMALIA   f   Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Germanic name Amala, a short form of names beginning with the element amal meaning "work".
AMANDA   f   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Late Roman
In part this is a feminine form of AMANDUS. However, it was not used during the Middle Ages. In the 17th century it was recreated by authors and poets who based it directly on Latin amanda "lovable, worthy of love". Notably, the playwright Colley Cibber used it for a character in his play 'Love's Last Shift' (1696). It came into regular use during the 19th century.
AMARANTA   f   Spanish (Rare), Italian (Rare)
Spanish and Italian form of AMARANTHA.
AMBRA   f   Italian
Italian cognate of AMBER.
AMEDEA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of AMADEUS.
AMELIA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Variant of AMALIA, though it is sometimes confused with EMILIA, which has a different origin. The name became popular in England after the German House of Hanover came to the British throne in the 18th century - it was borne by daughters of George II and George III. Another famous bearer was Amelia Earhart (1897-1937), the first woman to make a solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean.
AMORE   m & f   Italian
Italian form of AMOR.
ANASTASIA   f   Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, English, Spanish, Italian, Ancient Greek
Feminine form of ANASTASIUS. This was the name of a 4th-century Dalmatian saint who was martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. Due to her, the name has been common in Eastern Orthodox Christianity (in various spellings). As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages. A famous bearer was the youngest daughter of the last Russian tsar Nicholas II, who was rumoured to have escaped the execution of her family in 1918.
ANDREINA   f   Italian
Feminine form of ANDREA (1).
ANGELA   f   English, Italian, German, Dutch, Romanian, Slovene, Slovak, Russian, Macedonian, Late Roman
Feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL). As an English name, it came into use in the 18th century.
ANGELICA   f   English, Italian, Romanian, Literature
Derived from Latin angelicus meaning "angelic", ultimately related to Greek αγγελος (angelos) "messenger". The poets Boiardo and Ariosto used this name in their 'Orlando' poems (1495 and 1532), where it belongs to Orlando's love interest. It has been used as a given name since the 18th century.
ANGELINA   f   Italian, English, Russian, German, Dutch, Polish, Spanish, Macedonian
Latinate diminutive of ANGELA. A famous bearer is American actress Angelina Jolie (1975-).
ANNA   f   English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.... [more]
ANNABELLA   f   Italian, English (Modern)
Latinate form of ANNABEL. It can also be taken as a combination of ANNA and BELLA.
ANNALISA   f   Italian
Combination of ANNA and LISA.
ANNAMARIA   f   Italian
Combination of ANNA and MARIA.
ANNETTA   f   Italian
Latinate diminutive of ANNA.
ANNUNCIATA   f   Italian
Variant of ANNUNZIATA.
ANNUNZIATA   f   Italian
Means "announced" in Italian, referring to the event in the New Testament in which the angel Gabriel tells the Virgin Mary of the imminent birth of Jesus.
ANSELMA   f   German, Italian, Spanish
Feminine form of ANSELM.
ANTONELLA   f   Italian
Feminine diminutive of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTONIETTA   f   Italian
Diminutive of ANTONIA.
ANTONINA   f   Italian, Polish, Russian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Antoninus (see ANTONINO).
APOLLONIA   f   Ancient Greek, Italian
Feminine form of APOLLONIOS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint and martyr from Alexandria.
ARIANNA   f   Italian
Italian form of ARIADNE.
ARMIDA   f   Italian, Spanish
Probably created by the 16th-century Italian poet Torquato Tasso for his epic poem 'Jerusalem Delivered' (1580). In the poem Armida is a beautiful enchantress who bewitches many of the crusaders.
ASIA (1)   f   English (Modern), Italian (Modern)
From the name of the continent, which is perhaps derived from Akkadian asu, meaning "east".
ASSUNTA   f   Italian
Italian cognate of ASUNCIÓN.
AUGUSTA   f   German, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AUGUSTUS. It was introduced to Britain when king George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
AURELIANA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AURELIANUS.
AURORA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
AZZURRA   f   Italian
Means "azure, sky blue" in Italian.
BALBINA   f   Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), Italian (Rare), Ancient Roman
Feminine form of BALBINUS. Saint Balbina was a 2nd-century Roman woman martyred with her father Quirinus.
BARBARA   f   English, Italian, French, German, Polish, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Late Roman
Derived from Greek βαρβαρος (barbaros) meaning "foreign". According to legend, Saint Barbara was a young woman killed by her father Dioscorus, who was then killed by a bolt of lightning. She is the patron of architects, geologists, stonemasons and artillerymen. Because of her renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world in the Middle Ages. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was revived in the 19th century.
BEATRICE   f   Italian, English, Swedish
Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari (1266-1290) was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She serves as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem the 'Divine Comedy' (1321). This is also the name of a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599), in which Beatrice and Benedick are fooled into confessing their love for one another.
BENEDETTA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENIGNA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Late Roman
Feminine form of BENIGNO.
BERENICE   f   English, Italian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Βερενικη (Berenike), the Macedonian form of the Greek name Φερενικη (Pherenike), which meant "bringing victory" from φερω (phero) "to bring" and νικη (nike) "victory". This name was common among the Ptolemy ruling family of Egypt, a dynasty which was originally from Macedon. It occurs briefly in Acts in the New Testament (in most English Bibles it is spelled Bernice) belonging to a sister of King Herod Agrippa II. As an English name, Berenice came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
BERNARDETTA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of BERNARD.
BERNARDINA   f   Italian
Italian feminine diminutive of BERNARDO.
BETTINA (2)   f   Italian
Diminutive of BENEDETTA.
BIANCA   f   Italian, Romanian
Italian cognate of BLANCHE. Shakespeare used characters named Bianca in 'Taming of the Shrew' (1593) and 'Othello' (1603).
BIBIANA   f   Italian, Spanish, Late Roman
Possibly an early variant of VIVIANA. Alternatively, it may be a feminine derivative of the earlier Roman cognomen VIBIANUS.
BICE   f   Italian
Short form of BEATRICE.
BRIGIDA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of BRIDGET.
BRUNA   f   Italian, Portuguese, Croatian
Feminine form of BRUNO.
BRUNELLA   f   Italian
Feminine diminutive of BRUNO.
BRUNILDA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of BRÜNHILD.
CALOGERA   f   Italian
Feminine form of CALOGERO.
CAMILLA   f   English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, German, Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of CAMILLUS. This was the name of a legendary warrior maiden of the Volsci, as told by Virgil in the 'Aeneid'. It was popularized in the English-speaking world by Fanny Burney's novel 'Camilla' (1796).
CARLOTTA   f   Italian
Italian form of CHARLOTTE.
CARMELA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of CARMEL.
CARMEN   f   Spanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Medieval Spanish form of CARMEL influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera 'Carmen' (1875).
CARMINA   f   Italian, Spanish
Variant of CARMEN.
CAROLA   f   Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish
Feminine form of CAROLUS.
CAROLINA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish
Latinate feminine form of CAROLUS. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.
CASSANDRA   f   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.... [more]
CATARINA   f   Italian, Portuguese, Occitan, Galician
Italian, Portuguese, Occitan and Galician form of KATHERINE.
CATERINA   f   Italian, Catalan
Italian and Catalan form of KATHERINE.
CECILIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish, Dutch, German
Latinate feminine form of the Roman family name Caecilius, which was derived from Latin caecus "blind". Saint Cecilia was a semi-legendary 2nd- or 3rd-century martyr who was sentenced to die because she refused to worship the Roman gods. After attempts to suffocate her failed, she was beheaded. She was later regarded as the patron saint of music and musicians.... [more]
CELESTE   f & m   Italian, English
Italian feminine and masculine form of CAELESTIS. It is also the English feminine form.
CELESTINA   f   Spanish, Italian
Latinate feminine form of CAELESTINUS.
CELIA   f   English, Spanish, Italian
Feminine form of the Roman family name CAELIUS. Shakespeare used it in his play 'As You Like It' (1599), which introduced the name to the English-speaking public at large. It is sometimes used as a short form of CECILIA.
CESARINA   f   Italian
Feminine diminutive of CESARE.
CHIARA   f   Italian
Italian form of CLARA. Saint Chiara (commonly called Saint Clare in English) was a follower of Saint Francis of Assisi.
CHIARINA   f   Italian
Diminutive of CHIARA.
CINZIA   f   Italian
Italian form of CYNTHIA.
CLARA   f   Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CLARETTA   f   Italian
Diminutive of CLARA.
CLARISSA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
Latinate form of CLARICE. This was the name of the title character in a 1748 novel by Samuel Richardson. In the novel Clarissa is a virtuous woman who is tragically exploited by her family and her lover.
CLAUDIA   f   English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
CLELIA   f   Italian
Italian form of CLOELIA.
CLEMENTINA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Feminine form of CLEMENT.
CLIO   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Italian
Latinized form of KLEIO.
CLOE   f   Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of CHLOE.
CLOTILDE   f   French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
French form of the Germanic name Chlotichilda which was composed of the elements hlud "fame" and hild "battle". Saint Clotilde was the wife of the Frankish king Clovis, whom she converted to Christianity.
COLOMBA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of COLUMBA.
COLOMBINA   f   Italian
Italian feminine diminutive of COLUMBA. In traditional Italian pantomimes this is the name of a stock character, the female counterpart of Arlecchino (also called Harlequin). This is also the Italian word for the columbine flower.
CONCETTA   f   Italian
Italian cognate of CONCEPCIÓN.
CONCETTINA   f   Italian
Diminutive of CONCETTA.
CONSOLATA   f   Italian
Means "consoled" in Italian. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, María Consolata.
CORNELIA   f   German, Romanian, Italian, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CORNELIUS. In the 2nd century BC it was borne by Cornelia Scipionis Africana (the daughter of the military hero Scipio Africanus), the mother of the two reformers known as the Gracchi. After her death she was regarded as an example of the ideal Roman woman. The name was revived in the 18th century.
CORONA   f   Late Roman, Italian, Spanish
Means "crown" in Latin, as well as Italian and Spanish. This was the name of a 2nd-century saint who was martyred with her companion Victor.
COSIMA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of COSIMO.
CRISTIANA   f   Italian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of CHRISTINA.
CRISTINA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian
Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Romanian form of CHRISTINA.
CROCETTA   f   Italian
Diminutive of CROCIFISSA.
CROCIFISSA   f   Italian
Means "crucifix" in Italian.
DAFNE   f   Italian
Italian form of DAPHNE.
DAMIANA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of DAMIAN.
DANIA (1)   f   Italian
Italian diminutive of DANIELA.
DARIA   f   Italian, Polish, Romanian, English, Croatian, Late Greek (Latinized)
Feminine form of DARIUS. Saint Daria was a 3rd-century Greek woman who was martyred with her husband Chrysanthus under the Roman emperor Numerian. It has never been a particularly common English given name.
DEBORA   f   Italian, German, Dutch
Italian, German and Dutch form of DEBORAH.
DELFINA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of DELPHINA.
DELIA (1)   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Greek Mythology
Means "of Delos" in Greek. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Artemis, given because she and her twin brother Apollo were born on the island of Delos. The name appeared in several poems of the 16th and 17th centuries, and it has occasionally been used as a given name since that time.
DEMETRA   f   Italian, Romanian, Greek
Italian and Romanian form of DEMETER (1), as well as a variant transcription of Greek DIMITRA.
DESIDERIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Late Roman
Feminine form of DESIDERIO. This was the Latin name of a 19th-century queen of Sweden, the wife of Karl XIV. She was born in France with the name Désirée.
DIANA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Roman Mythology
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.... [more]
DINA (2)   f   Italian, Portuguese
Short form of names ending in dina.
DOMENICA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of DOMINIC.
DOMITILLA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name DOMITIUS. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Vespasian and the mother of emperors Titus and Domitian.
DONATA   f   Italian, Late Roman
Feminine form of DONATO.
DONATELLA   f   Italian
Diminutive of DONATA.
EDDA (1)   f   Italian
Italian form of HEDDA.
EDMONDA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of EDMUND.
EDVIGE   f   Italian
Italian form of HEDWIG.
ELDA   f   Italian
Italian form of HILDA.
ELENA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Russian, German, Medieval Slavic
Cognate of HELEN, and a variant transcription of Russian YELENA.
ELETTRA   f   Italian
Italian form of ELECTRA.
ELIANA (1)   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ÉLIANE.
ELISABETTA   f   Italian
Italian form of ELIZABETH.
ELOISA   f   Italian
Italian form of ELOISE.
ELVIRA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Russian
Spanish form of a Visigothic name, possibly composed of the Germanic elements ala "all" and wer "true". This is the name of a character in Mozart's opera 'Don Giovanni' (1787).
EMANUELA   f   Italian, Romanian
Italian and Romanian feminine form of EMMANUEL.
EMILIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Finnish, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMILIANA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Feminine form of EMILIANO.
EMMA   f   English, French, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.... [more]
ENRICA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of HENRY.
ERICA   f   English, Swedish, Italian
Feminine form of ERIC. It was first used in the 18th century. It also coincides with the Latin word for "heather".
ERIKA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovene, Croatian, English, Italian
Feminine form of ERIK. It also coincides with the word for "heather" in some languages.
ERMELINDA   f   Italian
Derived from the Germanic elements ermen "whole, universal" and linde "soft, tender".
ERMENEGILDA   f   Italian (Rare)
Feminine form of ERMENEGILDO.
ERMINIA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of HERMINIUS.
ERNESTA   f   Italian, Lithuanian
Feminine form of ERNEST.
ERNESTINA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of ERNEST.
ERSILIA   f   Italian
Italian form of HERSILIA.
EUFEMIA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of EUPHEMIA.
EUGENIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Feminine form of Eugenius (see EUGENE). It was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century saint who escaped persecution by disguising herself as a man. The name was occasionally found in England during the Middle Ages, but it was not regularly used until the 19th century.
EULALIA   f   Spanish, Italian, English, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ευλαλος (eulalos) meaning "sweetly-speaking", itself from ευ (eu) "good" and λαλεω (laleo) "to talk". This was the name of an early 4th-century saint and martyr from Merida in Spain. She is a patron saint of Barcelona.
EVA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant transcription of Russian YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.
EVELINA   f   English, Italian, Swedish
Latinate form of AVELINE. It was revived by the author Fanny Burney for the heroine of her first novel 'Evelina' (1778). It is often regarded as a variant of the related name EVELYN or an elaboration of EVE.
FABIA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of FABIUS.
FABIANA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Fabianus (see FABIAN).
FABIOLA   f   Italian, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Diminutive of FABIA. This was the name of a 4th-century saint from Rome.
FABRIZIA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of Fabricius (see FABRICE).
FAUSTA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of FAUSTUS.
FAUSTINA   f   Ancient Roman, Italian
Feminine form of Faustinus (see FAUSTINO).
FEBE   f   Dutch, Spanish, Italian
Dutch, Spanish and Italian form of PHOEBE.
FEDERICA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of FREDERICK.
FELICIANA   f   Spanish, Italian, Late Roman
Feminine form of Felicianus (see FELICIANO).
FELICITA   f   Italian
Italian form of FELICITAS. It also coincides closely with Italian felicità "happiness".
FERDINANDA   f   Italian, German
Feminine form of FERDINAND.
FERNANDA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian feminine form of FERDINAND.
FIAMMETTA   f   Italian
Derived from Italian fiamma "fire" combined with a diminutive suffix.
FILIPPA   f   Russian, Greek, Swedish, Italian
Russian, Greek, Swedish and Italian feminine form of PHILIP.
FILOMENA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch
Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch form of PHILOMENA.
FINA   f   Italian
Short form of SERAFINA. Saint Fina, also known as Saint Serafina, was a 13th-century girl from the town of San Gimignano in Italy.
FIORALBA   f   Italian
Combination of Italian fiore "flower" and alba "dawn".
FIORELLA   f   Italian
From Italian fiore "flower" combined with a diminutive suffix.
FIORENZA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of Florentius (see FLORENCE).
FLAVIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of FLAVIUS.
FLAVIANA   f   Ancient Roman, Italian
Feminine form of FLAVIAN.
FLORA   f   English, German, Italian, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin flos meaning "flower". Flora was the Roman goddess of flowers and spring, the wife of Zephyr the west wind. It has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, starting in France. In Scotland it was sometimes used as an Anglicized form of Fionnghuala.
FLORIANA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Italian feminine form of FLORIAN.
FRANCA   f   Italian
Contracted form of FRANCESCA.
FRANCESCA   f   Italian, Catalan
Italian and Catalan feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FULVIA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Fulvius (see FULVIO).
GABRIELLA   f   Italian, Hungarian, English, Swedish
Feminine form of GABRIEL.
GAETANA   f   Italian
Feminine form of GAETANO.
GAIA   f   Greek Mythology, Italian
From the Greek word γαια (gaia), a parallel form of γη (ge) meaning "earth". In Greek mythology Gaia was the mother goddess who presided over the earth. She was the mate of Uranus and the mother of the Titans and the Cyclopes.
GELTRUDE   f   Italian
Italian form of GERTRUDE.
GEMMA   f   Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
GENOVEFFA   f   Italian
Italian form of GENEVIÈVE.
GERARDA   f   Italian, Dutch
Feminine form of GERARD.
GERMANA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of GERMANUS.
GESSICA   f   Italian
Italian variant of JESSICA.
GIA   f   Italian
Diminutive of GIANNA.
GIACINTA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of HYACINTHUS.
GIACOMA   f   Italian
Feminine form of GIACOMO.
GIACOMINA   f   Italian
Feminine form of GIACOMO.
GIADA   f   Italian
Italian form of JADE.
GIANNA   f   Italian, Greek
Italian short form of GIOVANNA and a modern Greek variant of IOANNA.
GIANNINA   f   Italian
Diminutive of GIOVANNA.
GILBERTA   f   Dutch, Italian
Feminine form of GILBERT or GILBERTO.
GILDA   f   Italian, Portuguese
Originally an Italian short form of names containing the Germanic element gild meaning "sacrifice, value".
GINA   f   Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of GEORGINA, REGINA, LUIGINA, and other names ending in gina. It can also be used as a diminutive of VIRGINIA or EUGENIA. It was popularized in the 1950s by Italian actress Gina Lollobrigida (1927-), whose birth name was Luigina.
GINEVRA   f   Italian
Italian form of GUINEVERE. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".
GIOCONDA   f   Italian
From the Late Latin name Iucunda which meant "pleasant, delightful, happy". Leonardo da Vinci's painting the 'Mona Lisa' is also known as 'La Gioconda' because its subject is Lisa del Giocondo.
GIOIA   f   Italian
Means "joy" in Italian.
GIORGIA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of GEORGE.
GIORGINA   f   Italian
Diminutive of GIORGIA.
GIOSETTA   f   Italian
Perhaps an Italian form of JOSETTE.
GIOVANNA   f   Italian
Italian form of Iohanna (see JOANNA), making it the feminine form of GIOVANNI.
GIOVANNETTA   f   Italian
Diminutive of GIOVANNA.
GISELLA   f   Italian
Italian form of GISELLE.
GIUDITTA   f   Italian
Italian form of JUDITH.
GIULIA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of JULIUS.
GIULIANA   f   Italian
Feminine form of GIULIANO.
GIULIETTA   f   Italian
Diminutive of GIULIA.
GIUSEPPA   f   Italian
Feminine form of GIUSEPPE.
GIUSEPPINA   f   Italian
Feminine form of GIUSEPPE.
GIUSTINA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of JUSTIN.
GLORIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Polish
Means "glory" in Latin. The name (first?) appeared in E. D. E. N. Southworth's novel 'Gloria' (1891) and subsequently in George Bernard Shaw's play 'You Never Can Tell' (1898). It was popularized in the early 20th century by American actress Gloria Swanson (1899-1983). Another famous bearer is feminist Gloria Steinem (1934-).
GRAZIA   f   Italian
Means "grace" in Italian, making it a cognate of GRACE.
GRAZIANA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of Gratianus (see GRATIAN).
GRAZIELLA   f   Italian
Diminutive of GRAZIA.
IDA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'The Princess' (1847), which was later adapted into the play 'Princess Ida' (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.... [more]
ILARIA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of HILARIUS.
ILDA   f   Italian
Italian form of HILDA.
ILEANA   f   Romanian, Spanish, Italian
Possibly a Romanian variant of ELENA. In Romanian folklore this is the name of a princess kidnapped by monsters and rescued by a heroic knight.
IMELDA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of IRMHILD. The Blessed Imelda was a young 14th-century nun from Bologna.
IMMA   f   Italian, Catalan
Short form of IMMACOLATA or IMMACULADA.
IMMACOLATA   f   Italian
Italian cognate of INMACULADA.
INES   f   Italian, Slovene, Croatian
Italian, Slovene and Croatian form of INÉS.
IOLANDA   f   Italian, Portuguese, Romanian
Italian, Portuguese and Romanian form of YOLANDA.
IRENE   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ειρηνη (Eirene), derived from a word meaning "peace". This was the name of the Greek goddess who personified peace, one of the ‘Ωραι (Horai). It was also borne by several early Christian saints. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, notably being borne by an 8th-century empress, who was the first woman to lead the empire. She originally served as regent for her son, but later had him killed and ruled alone.... [more]
IRMA   f   German, English, Dutch, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, Georgian, Lithuanian, Hungarian (Rare), Ancient Germanic
German short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ermen, which meant "whole, universal". It is thus related to EMMA. It began to be regularly used in the English-speaking world in the 19th century.
ISA (2)   f   German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish
Short form of ISABELLA.
ISABELLA   f   Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Romanian
Latinate form of ISABEL. This name was borne by many medieval royals, including queen consorts of England, France, Portugal, the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary, as well as the powerful ruling queen Isabella of Castile (properly called Isabel).
ISIDORA   f   Serbian, Macedonian, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian (Rare), Italian (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Greek
Feminine form of ISIDORE. This was the name of a 4th-century Egyptian saint and hermitess.
ISOTTA   f   Italian
Italian form of ISOLDE.
ITALA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of ITALUS.
ITALIA   f   Italian
From the Italian name of the country of Italy, Italia (see ITALUS).
JESSICA   f   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
This name was first used in this form by Shakespeare in his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596), where it belongs to the daughter of Shylock. Shakespeare probably based it on the biblical name ISCAH, which would have been spelled Jescha in his time. It was not commonly used as a given name until the middle of the 20th century. Notable bearers include actresses Jessica Tandy (1909-1994) and Jessica Lange (1949-).
JOLANDA   f   Dutch, Slovene, Croatian, Italian
Dutch, Slovene and Croatian form of YOLANDA, as well as an Italian variant of IOLANDA.
LARA (1)   f   Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Russian short form of LARISA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel 'Doctor Zhivago' (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965).
LAURA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
LAURETTA   f   Italian
Italian diminutive of LAURA.
LEANDRA   f   Portuguese, Spanish, Italian
Feminine form of LEANDER.
LELIA   f   Italian
Italian form of LAELIA.
LENA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese
Scandinavian, German and Polish short form of HELENA or MAGDALENA, and a Russian short form of YELENA.
LEONARDA   f   Italian
Feminine form of LEONARDO.
LEONORA   f   Italian
Italian short form of ELEANOR.
LEONTINA   f   Italian, Late Roman
Feminine form of LEONTIUS.
LETIZIA   f   Italian
Italian form of LETITIA. It was borne by Napoleon Bonaparte's mother.
LIA (1)   f   Italian, Portuguese, Georgian, Biblical Latin
Italian, Portuguese and Georgian form of LEAH.
LIA (2)   f   Italian, Dutch
Short form of ROSALIA, JULIA, and other names ending in lia.
LIANA   f   Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, English
Short form of ELIANA (1), JULIANA, LILIANA, and other names that end in liana. This is also the word for a type of vine that grows in jungles.
LIBORIA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of LIBORIUS.
LIDIA   f   Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian
Polish, Italian, Spanish and Romanian form of LYDIA.
LINA (2)   f   English, Italian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Lithuanian, Croatian
Short form of names ending in lina.
LINDA   f   English, Dutch, German, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element linde meaning "soft, tender". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful".
LISA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian
Short form of ELIZABETH, ELISABETH, ELISABET or ELISABETTA. This is the name of the subject of one of the world's most famous paintings, the 'Mona Lisa', the portrait of Lisa del Giocondo by Leonardo da Vinci.
LIVIA (1)   f   Italian, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LIVIUS. This was the name of the wife of the Roman emperor Augustus.
LIVIANA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman family name Livianus, which was itself derived from the family name LIVIUS.
LORA   f   English, Italian
Variant of LAURA. It is also used as an Italian diminutive of ELEONORA or LOREDANA.
LOREDANA   f   Italian, Romanian
Created by the French author George Sand for a character in her novel 'Mattea' (1833) and later used by the Italian author Luciano Zuccoli in his novel 'L'amore de Loredana' (1908). It was possibly based on the Venetian surname Loredan, which was derived from the place name Loreo.
LORENA (1)   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Croatian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of LORRAINE.
LORENZA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish feminine form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LORETA   f   Italian
Variant of LORETO.
LORETO   f & m   Italian, Spanish
From the name of a town in Italy, originally called Lauretum in Latin, meaning "laurel grove". Supposedly in the 13th century the house of the Virgin Mary was miraculously carried by angels from Nazareth to the town.
LORETTA   f   English, Italian
Either an elaboration of LORA or a variant of LAURETTA. It is also sometimes used as a variant of LORETO.
LORITA   f   Italian
Either a diminutive of LORA or a variant of LORETO.
LUANA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese
From the movie 'Bird of Paradise' (1932), in which it was borne by the main character, a Polynesian girl. The movie was based on a 1912 play of the same name set in Hawaii.
LUCE   f   Italian, French
Italian and French variant of LUCIA. This also means "light" in Italian.
LUCIA   f   Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.
LUCILLA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Latin diminutive of LUCIA. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint martyred in Rome.
LUCREZIA   f   Italian
Italian form of LUCRETIA.
LUDOVICA   f   Italian
Latinate feminine form of LUDWIG.
LUIGIA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of LOUIS.
LUIGINA   f   Italian
Diminutive of LUIGIA.
LUISA   f   Spanish, Italian
Feminine form of LUIS.
LUISELLA   f   Italian
Diminutive of LUISA.
MADDALENA   f   Italian
Italian form of MAGDALENE.
MAFALDA   f   Italian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of MATILDA.
MANUELA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, German, Italian
Feminine form of MANUEL.
MARCELLA   f   Italian, German, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of MARCELLUS.
MARGHERITA   f   Italian
Italian form of MARGARET. This is also the Italian word for "daisy flower" (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARIA   f & m   Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARIANGELA   f   Italian
Combination of MARIA and ANGELA.
MARIANNA   f   Italian, English, Hungarian, Slovak, Polish, Greek
Combination of MARIA and ANNA. It has been confused with the Roman name MARIANA to the point that it is no longer easy to separate the two forms. It is sometimes also used as a Latinized form of MARIAMNE.
MARIELLA   f   Italian
Italian diminutive of MARIA.
MARIETTA   f   Italian
Italian diminutive of MARIA.
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