Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is feminine; and the usage is Portuguese.
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ADELAIDE   f   English, Italian, Portuguese
From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.
ADRIENE   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian variant of ADRIANA.
ÁGUEDA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of AGATHA.
ALBERTA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese
Feminine form of ALBERT. This is the name of a Canadian province, which was named in honour of a daughter of Queen Victoria.
ALBERTINA   f   Italian, Dutch, Portuguese
Feminine diminutive of ALBERT.
ALBINA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Slovene, Polish, German, Lithuanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of ALBINUS. Saint Albina was a 3rd-century martyr from Caesarea.
ALDA (1)   f   Italian, Portuguese, Ancient Germanic
Feminine form of ALDO.
ALDINA (1)   f   Portuguese
Feminine form of ALDO.
ALEX   m & f   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Russian
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXANDRA   f   English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Ukrainian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.
ALEXANDRINA   f   Portuguese, English (Rare)
Elaborated form of ALEXANDRA. This was the first name of Queen Victoria; her middle name was Victoria.
ALICE   f   English, French, Portuguese, Italian
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).
ALÍCIA   f   Catalan, Portuguese
Catalan form of ALICE, as well as a Portuguese variant.
ALINE   f   French, Portuguese (Brazilian), English
Medieval short form of ADELINE. As an English name, in modern times it has sometimes been regarded as a variant of EILEEN. This was the name of a popular 1965 song by the French singer Christophe.
AMÁLIA   f   Hungarian, Portuguese, Slovak
Hungarian, Portuguese and Slovak form of AMALIA.
AMANDA   f   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Late Roman
In part this is a feminine form of AMANDUS. However, it was not used during the Middle Ages. In the 17th century it was recreated by authors and poets who based it directly on Latin amanda "lovable, worthy of love". Notably, the playwright Colley Cibber used it for a character in his play 'Love's Last Shift' (1696). It came into regular use during the 19th century.
AMÉLIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of AMELIA.
AMÉRICA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of AMERIGO.
AMOR   m & f   Roman Mythology, Late Roman, Spanish, Portuguese
Means "love" in Latin. This was another name for the Roman god Cupid. It also means "love" in Spanish and Portuguese, and the name can be derived directly from this vocabulary word.
ANABELA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of ANNABEL.
ANDRÉA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese feminine form of ANDREW.
ANDRÉIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of ANDREIA.
ANDREIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of ANDREW.
ÂNGELA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of Angelus (see ANGEL).
ANGÉLICA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of ANGELICA.
ANITA (1)   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian, Slovene, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Polish, Latvian
Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian and Slovene diminutive of ANA.
ANTÓNIA   f   Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian feminine form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTÔNIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese feminine form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
APOLÓNIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of APOLLONIA.
APOLÔNIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of APOLLONIA.
ASSUNÇÃO   f   Portuguese
Portuguese cognate of ASUNCIÓN.
AUGUSTA   f   German, Italian, Portuguese, Polish, Dutch, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of AUGUSTUS. It was introduced to Britain when king George III, a member of the German House of Hanover, gave this name to his second daughter in the 18th century.
AURORA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Romanian, Finnish, Roman Mythology
Means "dawn" in Latin. Aurora was the Roman goddess of the morning. It has occasionally been used as a given name since the Renaissance.
BALBINA   f   Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare), Italian (Rare), Ancient Roman
Feminine form of BALBINUS. Saint Balbina was a 2nd-century Roman woman martyred with her father Quirinus.
BÁRBARA   f   Portuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of BARBARA.
BEATRIZ   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of BEATRIX.
BELINHA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of ISABEL.
BENEDITA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of BENEDICT.
BENIGNA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Late Roman
Feminine form of BENIGNO.
BETÂNIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of BETHANY.
BETHÂNIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese variant form of BETHANY.
BIA   f   Portuguese
Diminutive of BEATRIZ.
BRANCA   f   Portuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician form of BLANCHE.
BRÍGIDA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of BRIDGET.
BRUNA   f   Italian, Portuguese, Croatian
Feminine form of BRUNO.
BRUNILDA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of BRÜNHILD.
CALISTA   f   English, Portuguese, Spanish
Feminine form of CALLISTUS. As an English name it might also be a variant of KALLISTO.
CALIXTA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of CALIXTUS.
CAMILA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CAMILLA.
CÂNDIDA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of CANDIDA.
CARINA (1)   f   English, Portuguese, Spanish, German, Late Roman
Late Latin name derived from cara meaning "dear, beloved". This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr. It is also the name of a constellation in the southern sky, though in this case it means "keel" in Latin, referring to a part of Jason's ship the Argo.
CARLOTA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of CHARLOTTE.
CARMO   m & f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of CARMEL.
CAROLINA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish
Latinate feminine form of CAROLUS. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.
CASSANDRA   f   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.... [more]
CÁSSIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of CASSIUS.
CATARINA   f   Portuguese, Occitan, Galician
Portuguese, Occitan and Galician form of KATHERINE.
CÁTIA   f   Portuguese
Diminutive of CATARINA.
CECÍLIA   f   Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian form of CECILIA.
CÉLIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of CELIA.
CESÁRIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of CAESARIUS.
CHICA   f   Portuguese
Diminutive of FRANCISCA.
CILA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of CECILIA.
CÍNTIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of CYNTHIA.
CLARA   f   Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, English, Swedish, Danish, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which meant "clear, bright, famous". The name Clarus was borne by a few early saints. The feminine form was popularized by the 13th-century Saint Clare of Assisi (called Chiara in Italian), a friend and follower of Saint Francis, who left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns known as the Poor Clares. As an English name it has been in use since the Middle Ages, originally in the form Clare, though the Latinate spelling Clara became more popular in the 19th century.
CLARISSA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
Latinate form of CLARICE. This was the name of the title character in a 1748 novel by Samuel Richardson. In the novel Clarissa is a virtuous woman who is tragically exploited by her family and her lover.
CLÁUDIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of CLAUDIUS.
CLEMENTINA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Feminine form of CLEMENT.
CLOÉ   f   Portuguese, French
Portuguese form and French variant of CHLOE.
CLOTILDE   f   French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish
French form of the Germanic name Chlotichilda which was composed of the elements hlud "fame" and hild "battle". Saint Clotilde was the wife of the Frankish king Clovis, whom she converted to Christianity.
CONSTANÇA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of CONSTANTIA.
CONSTÂNCIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of CONSTANTIA.
CRISTIANA   f   Italian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of CHRISTINA.
CRISTINA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian
Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Romanian form of CHRISTINA.
CRUZ   f & m   Spanish, Portuguese
Means "cross" in Spanish or Portuguese, referring to the cross of the crucifixion.
CUSTÓDIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of CUSTODIO.
DÉBORA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, French
Spanish, Portuguese and French form of DEBORAH.
DÉLIA   f   Portuguese, French, Hungarian
Portuguese, French and Hungarian form of DELIA (1).
DESIDÉRIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of DESIDERIO.
DIANA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Roman Mythology
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.... [more]
DINA (2)   f   Italian, Portuguese
Short form of names ending in dina.
DIONÍSIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of DIONYSIUS.
DOMITILA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of DOMITILLA.
DORES   f   Portuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician form of DOLORES.
DOROTÉIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of DOROTHEA.
DOROTEIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of DOROTHEA.
DUDA   m & f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO or EDUARDA.
DULCE   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Means "sweet" or "candy" in Spanish.
EDITE   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of EDITH.
EDUARDA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of EDWARD.
EFIGÉNIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of IPHIGENEIA.
EFIGÊNIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of IPHIGENEIA.
ELIANA (1)   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ÉLIANE.
ELISABETE   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of ELIZABETH. This more recent form is used alongside the traditional Portuguese form Isabel.
ELIZA   f   English, Polish, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Short form of ELIZABETH. It was borne by the character Eliza Doolittle in George Bernard Shaw's play 'Pygmalion' (1913) and the subsequent musical adaptation 'My Fair Lady' (1956).
ELVIRA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Russian
Spanish form of a Visigothic name, possibly composed of the Germanic elements ala "all" and wer "true". This is the name of a character in Mozart's opera 'Don Giovanni' (1787).
EMÍLIA   f   Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian feminine form of Aemilius (see EMIL).
EMILIANA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Feminine form of EMILIANO.
ENEIDA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian), Spanish (Latin American)
From the Portuguese and Spanish name of the 'Aeneid' (see AENEAS).
ÉRICA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of ERICA.
ESMERALDA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
ESTEFÂNIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of STEPHEN.
ESTELA   f   Portuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of ESTELLE.
EUFÊMIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of EUPHEMIA.
EUGÊNIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of EUGENIA.
EULÁLIA   f   Portuguese, Hungarian, Slovak
Portuguese, Hungarian and Slovak form of EULALIA.
EVA   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant transcription of Russian YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.
FÁBIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of FABIUS.
FABIANA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Fabianus (see FABIAN).
FÁTIMA   f   Portuguese, Spanish
From the name of a town in Portugal, which is derived from the Arabic feminine name FATIMAH, apparently after a Moorish princess who converted to Christianity during the Reconquista. The town became an important Christian pilgrimage center after 1917 when three local children reported witnessing repeated apparitions of the Virgin Mary.
FELÍCIA   f   Hungarian, Portuguese
Hungarian and Portuguese form of FELICIA.
FELICIDADE   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of FELICITAS. It also means "happiness" in Portuguese.
FERNANDA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian feminine form of FERDINAND.
FILIPA   f   Portuguese
Feminine form of PHILIP.
FILOMENA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch
Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch form of PHILOMENA.
FLÁVIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of FLAVIUS.
FLORINDA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Elaborated form of Spanish or Portuguese flor meaning "flower".
FRANCISCA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Late Roman
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FREDERICA   f   Portuguese, English
Feminine form of FREDERICO or FREDERICK.
GENOVEVA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of GENEVIÈVE.
GERTRUDES   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of GERTRUDE.
GILDA   f   Italian, Portuguese
Originally an Italian short form of names containing the Germanic element gild meaning "sacrifice, value".
GISELA   f   German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
German, Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese form of GISELLE.
GLÁUCIA   f   Portuguese
Feminine form of GLÁUCIO.
GLORIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German
Means "glory" in Latin. The name (first?) appeared in E. D. E. N. Southworth's novel 'Gloria' (1891) and subsequently in George Bernard Shaw's play 'You Never Can Tell' (1898). It was popularized in the early 20th century by American actress Gloria Swanson (1899-1983). Another famous bearer is feminist Gloria Steinem (1934-).
GRAÇA   f   Portuguese
Means "grace" in Portuguese, making it a cognate of GRACE.
GRACIANA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Feminine form of GRACIANO.
GRACÍLIA   f   Portuguese
Elaboration of GRAÇA.
GUIOMAR   f & m   Portuguese, Spanish, Arthurian Romance
Possibly derived from the Germanic name Wigmar, which is formed of the elements wig "war, battle" and meri "famous". In the medieval 'Lancelot-Grail' cycle he plays a minor role as a cousin of Guinevere, who banishes him after he becomes a lover of Morgan le Fey. In modern Portugal and Spain it is a feminine name.
HERMÍNIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of HERMINIUS.
IDA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element id meaning "work, labour". The Normans brought this name to England, though it eventually died out there in the Middle Ages. It was strongly revived in the 19th century, in part due to the heroine in Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem 'The Princess' (1847), which was later adapted into the play 'Princess Ida' (1884) by Gilbert and Sullivan.... [more]
IMACULADA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese cognate of INMACULADA.
INÊS   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of AGNES.
IOLANDA   f   Italian, Portuguese, Romanian
Italian, Portuguese and Romanian form of YOLANDA.
IRENE   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ειρηνη (Eirene), derived from a word meaning "peace". This was the name of the Greek goddess who personified peace, one of the ‘Ωραι (Horai). It was also borne by several early Christian saints. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, notably being borne by an 8th-century empress, who was the first woman to lead the empire. She originally served as regent for her son, but later had him killed and ruled alone.... [more]
IRIA   f   Portuguese, Galician
Possibly a Portuguese and Galician form of IRENE. This was the name of a 7th-century saint (also known as Irene) from Tomar in Portugal. This is also the name of an ancient town in Galicia (now a district of Padrón).
ÍRIS   f   Portuguese, Icelandic
Portuguese and Icelandic form of IRIS.
ISABEL   f   Spanish, Portuguese, English, French, German
Medieval Occitan form of ELIZABETH. It spread throughout Spain, Portugal and France, becoming common among the royalty by the 12th century. It grew popular in England in the 13th century after Isabella of Angoulême married the English king John, and it was subsequently bolstered when Isabella of France married Edward II the following century.... [more]
ISABELA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian
Latinate form of ISABEL.
ISAURA   f   Portuguese, Spanish, Late Roman
Late Latin name which meant "from Isauria". Isauria was the name of a region in Asia Minor.
ISIDORA   f   Serbian, Macedonian, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian (Rare), Italian (Rare), English (Rare), Ancient Greek
Feminine form of ISIDORE. This was the name of a 4th-century Egyptian saint and hermitess.
IZABEL   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese (especially Brazilian) variant of ISABEL.
JACINTA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of HYACINTHUS.
JÉSSICA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of JESSICA.
JOANA   f   Portuguese, Catalan
Portuguese and Catalan form of Iohanna (see JOANNA).
JOANINHA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of JOANA.
JOSEFA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Czech
Spanish, Portuguese and Czech feminine form of JOSEPH.
JOSEFINA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish
Spanish, Portuguese and Swedish feminine form of JOSEPH.
JOVITA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of the Roman name Iovita (masculine), which was derived from the name of the god JOVE. This was the name of an early saint and martyr, the brother of Faustinus.
JUDITE   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of JUDITH.
JÚLIA   f   Portuguese, Catalan, Hungarian, Slovak
Portuguese, Catalan, Hungarian and Slovak form of JULIA.
JULIANA   f   Dutch, German, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Iulianus (see JULIAN). This was the name of a 4th-century saint and martyr from Nicomedia, and also of the Blessed Juliana of Norwich, also called Julian, a 14th-century mystic and author. The name was also borne by a 20th-century queen of the Netherlands. In England, this form has been in use since the 18th century, alongside the older form Gillian.
JULIE   f   French, Danish, Norwegian, Czech, English, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Danish, Norwegian and Czech form of JULIA. It has spread to many other regions as well. It has been common in the English-speaking world since the early 20th century.
JULINHA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of JÚLIA.
LARA (1)   f   Russian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian
Russian short form of LARISA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by a character from Boris Pasternak's novel 'Doctor Zhivago' (1957) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1965).
LARISSA   f   English, Portuguese (Brazilian), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Variant of LARISA. It has been commonly used as an English given name only since the 20th century. In 1991 this name was given to one of the moons of Neptune, in honour of the mythological character.
LAURA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
LEANDRA   f   Portuguese, Spanish, Italian
Feminine form of LEANDER.
LENA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Russian, English, Italian, Portuguese, Greek
Short form of names ending in lena, such as HELENA, MAGDALENA or YELENA.
LEOCÁDIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of LEOCADIA.
LEONOR   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of ELEANOR. It was brought to Spain in the 12th-century by Eleanor of England, who married king Alfonso VIII of Castile.
LETÍCIA   f   Portuguese, Hungarian
Portuguese and Hungarian form of LETITIA.
LIA (1)   f   Italian, Portuguese, Georgian, Greek, Biblical Latin
Italian, Portuguese, Georgian and Greek form of LEAH.
LIANA   f   Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, English
Short form of JULIANA, LILIANA, and other names that end in liana. This is also the word for a type of vine that grows in jungles.
LÍDIA   f   Portuguese, Catalan, Hungarian
Portuguese, Catalan and Hungarian form of LYDIA.
LÍGIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of LIGEIA.
LÍLIAN   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese variant of LILLIAN.
LÍVIA   f   Portuguese, Hungarian, Slovak
Portuguese, Hungarian and Slovak form of LIVIA (1).
LORENA (1)   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Croatian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of LORRAINE.
LUANA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese
From the movie 'Bird of Paradise' (1932), in which it was borne by the main character, a Polynesian girl. The movie was based on a 1912 play of the same name set in Hawaii.
LÚCIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of LUCIA.
LUCÍLIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of LUCILIUS.
LUCINDA   f   English, Portuguese, Literature
An elaboration of LUCIA created by Cervantes for his novel 'Don Quixote' (1605). It was subsequently used by Molière in his play 'The Doctor in Spite of Himself' (1666).
LUÍSA   f   Portuguese
Feminine form of LUÍS.
LUIZA   f   Polish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Romanian
Polish, Portuguese and Romanian feminine form of LOUIS.
LURDES   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of LOURDES.
LUZIA   f   Portuguese, German
Portuguese and German form of LUCIA.
MADALENA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of MAGDALENA.
MAFALDA   f   Italian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of MATILDA.
MAIA (1)   f   Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology, Portuguese, Georgian
Meaning unknown. In Greek and Roman mythology she was the eldest of the Pleiades, the group of seven stars in the constellation Taurus, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione. Her son by Zeus was Hermes.
MANOELA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Feminine form of MANOEL.
MANUELA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, German, Italian
Feminine form of MANUEL.
MÁRCIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of MARCIA.
MARCIANE   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian variant of MARCIANA.
MARGARIDA   f   Portuguese, Galician, Catalan, Occitan
Portuguese, Galician, Catalan and Occitan form of MARGARET. This is also the Portuguese and Galician word for the daisy flower (species Leucanthemum vulgare).
MARIA   f & m   Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARIANA   f   Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, Czech, Ancient Roman
Roman feminine form of MARIANUS. After the classical era it was frequently interpreted as a combination of MARIA and ANA. In Portuguese it is further used as a form of MARIAMNE.
MARIAZINHA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of MARIA.
MARISA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese combination of MARIA and LUISA.
MARISTELA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
From the title of the Virgin Mary, Stella Maris, meaning "star of the sea" in Latin. It can also be a combination of MARÍA and ESTELA.
MATILDE   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of MATILDA.
MICAELA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of MICHAEL.
MIGUELA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Feminine form of MIGUEL.
MOEMA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Means "lies" in Tupí. This name appears in the poem 'Caramuru' (1781) by the Brazilian poet Santa Rita Durão.
MÔNICA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of MONICA.
MONICA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Late Roman
Meaning unknown, most likely of North African or Phoenician origin. In the 4th century this name was borne by the North African saint Monica of Hippo, the mother of Saint Augustine, whom she converted to Christianity. Since the Middle Ages it has been associated with Latin moneo "advisor" and Greek monos "one". As an English name, Monica has been in general use since the 18th century.
NARCISA   f   Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian
Feminine form of NARCISSUS.
NATACHA   f   French, Portuguese
French and Portuguese form of NATASHA.
NATÁLIA   f   Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATHÁLIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NELA   f   Croatian, Slovak, Portuguese, Czech
Short form of names ending in nela, such as ANTONELA.
NELINHA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of MANUELA.
NEVES   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of NIEVES.
NILDA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of BRUNILDA.
NOÉMIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of NAOMI (1).
NOÊMIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of NAOMI (1).
NÚRIA   f   Catalan, Portuguese
From a Catalan title of the Virgin Mary, Nostra Senyora de Núria, meaning "Our Lady of Nuria". Nuria is a sanctuary in Spain in which there is a shrine containing a famous statue of Mary.
OCTÁVIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of OCTAVIA.
OFÉLIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of OPHELIA.
OLGA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, Grand Prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
OLÍVIA   f   Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian form of OLIVIA.
ONDINA   f   Portuguese, Italian
Portuguese and Italian form of UNDINE.
OTÁVIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of OCTAVIA.
PALMIRA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Feminine form of PALMIRO.
PATRÍCIA   f   Slovak, Portuguese, Hungarian
Slovak, Portuguese and Hungarian feminine form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PAULA   f   German, English, Finnish, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Romanian, Hungarian, Polish, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Croatian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Paulus (see PAUL). This was the name of a 4th-century Roman saint who was a companion of Saint Jerome.
PAULINA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Swedish, Lithuanian, English, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PAULINHA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of PAULA.
PERPÉTUA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of PERPETUA.
PRISCILA   f   Portuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of PRISCILLA.
RAFAELA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Macedonian
Spanish, Portuguese and Macedonian feminine form of RAPHAEL.
RAQUEL   f   Spanish, Portuguese, English
Spanish and Portuguese form of RACHEL.
REBECA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of REBECCA.
REGINA   f   English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.
RITA   f   Italian, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of MARGHERITA and other names ending in rita. A famous bearer was American actress Rita Hayworth (1918-1987).
ROSA (1)   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).
ROSÁLIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of ROSALIA.
ROSALIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Late Roman
Late Latin name derived from rosa "rose". This was the name of a 12th-century Sicilian saint.
ROSALINA   f   Portuguese, Spanish
Latinate form of ROSALINE.
ROSANA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of ROXANA.
ROSÁRIO   f   Portuguese
Portuguese (feminine) form of ROSARIO.
ROSINHA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of ROSA (1).
RUTE   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of RUTH (1).
SABINA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Swedish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Sabinus, a Roman cognomen meaning "Sabine" in Latin. The Sabines were an ancient people who lived in central Italy, their lands eventually taken over by the Romans after several wars. According to legend, the Romans abducted several Sabine women during a raid, and when the men came to rescue them, the women were able to make peace between the two groups. This name was borne by several early saints.
SALOMÉ   f   French, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of SALOME.
SANDRA   f   Italian, English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian
Short form of ALESSANDRA. It was introduced to the English-speaking world by author George Meredith, who used it for the heroine in his novel 'Emilia in England' (1864) and the reissued version 'Sandra Belloni' (1887). A famous bearer is American actress Sandra Bullock (1964-).
SERAFINA   f   Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Polish (Rare)
Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and Polish form of SERAPHINA.
SÍLVIA   f   Portuguese, Catalan
Portuguese and Catalan form of SILVIA.
SILVIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, English, German, Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of SILVIUS. Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. This was also the name of a 6th-century saint, the mother of the pope Gregory the Great. It has been a common name in Italy since the Middle Ages. It was introduced to England by Shakespeare, who used it for a character in his play 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594). It is now more commonly spelled Sylvia in the English-speaking world.
SOL (1)   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Means "the sun" in Spanish or Portuguese.
SUSANA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of SUSANNA.
TALITA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of TALITHA, popular in Brazil.
TÂNIA   f   Portuguese
Short form of TATIANA.
TATIANA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Greek, Georgian, English, Russian, Bulgarian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman name Tatianus, a derivative of the Roman name TATIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century saint who was martyred in Rome under the emperor Alexander Severus. She was especially venerated in Orthodox Christianity, and the name has been common in Russia (as Татьяна) and Eastern Europe. It was not regularly used in the English-speaking world until the 1980s.
TELMA   f   Portuguese
Either a Portuguese form of THELMA or a feminine form of TELMO.
TEODORA   f   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Romanian, Polish, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian
Feminine form of Theodoros (see THEODORE).
TERESA   f   Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Polish, Finnish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Cognate of THERESA. Saint Teresa of Ávila was a 16th-century Spanish nun who reformed the Carmelite monasteries and wrote several spiritual books. It was also borne by the beatified Albanian missionary Mother Teresa (1910-1997), who worked with the poor in Calcutta. She adopted the name in honour of the French saint Thérèse de Lisieux, who is the patron of missionaries.
TERESINHA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of TERESA.
TEREZA   f   Czech, Portuguese (Brazilian), Bulgarian, Romanian
Czech, Portuguese, Bulgarian and Romanian form of THERESA.
TEREZINHA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese diminutive of TEREZA.
THAÍS   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese (especially Brazilian) form of THAÏS.
ÚRSULA   f   Portuguese, Spanish
Portuguese and Spanish form of URSULA.
VALÉRIA   f   Portuguese, Hungarian, Slovak
Portuguese, Hungarian and Slovak feminine form of VALERIUS.
VALQUÍRIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of VALKYRIE.
VANESSA   f   English, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Invented by author Jonathan Swift for his poem 'Cadenus and Vanessa' (1726). He arrived at it by rearranging the initial syllables of the first name and surname of Esther Vanhomrigh, his close friend. Vanessa was later used as the name of a genus of butterfly. It was a rare given name until the mid-20th century, at which point it became fairly popular.
VERA (1)   f   Russian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Hungarian, Romanian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Means "faith" in Russian, though it is sometimes associated with the Latin word verus "true". It has been in general use in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century.
VERÔNICA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of VERONICA.
VIRGINIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman family name Verginius or Virginius which is of unknown meaning, but long associated with Latin virgo "maid, virgin". According to a legend, it was the name of a Roman woman killed by her father so as to save her from the clutches of a crooked official.... [more]
VITÓRIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of VICTORIA.
ZITA (1)   f   Italian, Portuguese, German, Czech, Slovak
Means "little girl" in Tuscan Italian. This was the name of a 13th-century saint, the patron saint of servants.
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