Masculine Names

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DROGOmEnglish (Archaic)
Norman name, possibly derived from Gothic dragen "to carry" or Saxon drog "ghost". Alternatively, it could be from the Slavic element dragu "precious, dear". The Normans introduced this name to England.
DRORmHebrew
Means "freedom" or "sparrow" in Hebrew.
DRUMMONDmEnglish (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was derived from various place names, themselves derived from Gaelic druim meaning "ridge".
DRUPADAmHinduism
Means "wooden pillar" or "firm footed" in Sanskrit. In the Hindu epic the 'Mahabharata' this is the name of a king of Panchala, the father of Draupadi and Dhrishtadyumna.
DRUSTmAncient Celtic
Pictish name probably derived from Celtic drest meaning "riot" or "tumult". This name was borne by several kings of the Picts, including their last king Drust X, who ruled in the 9th century.
DRUSTANmAncient Celtic
Older form of TRISTAN. This name was borne by a 7th-century Scottish saint.
DRUSUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name, also sometimes used as a praenomen, or given name, by the Claudia family. Apparently the name was first assumed by a Roman warrior who killed a Gallic chieftain named Drausus in single combat. Drausus possibly derives from a Celtic element meaning "strong".
DRYSTANmWelsh
Welsh form of TRISTAN.
DUmPortuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO.
DUANEmEnglish, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Ó Dubhán meaning "descendant of DUBHÁN".
DUARTEmPortuguese
Portuguese form of EDWARD. This name was borne by a 15th-century king of Portugal, who was named after his maternal ancestor Edward III of England.
DUBAKUm & fWestern African, Akan
Means "eleventh born child" in Akan.
DUBHÁNmIrish
Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" combined with a diminutive suffix.
DUBHGHALLmIrish, Scottish
Original Gaelic form of DOUGAL.
DUBHGHLASmScottish
Original Gaelic form of DOUGLAS.
DUBHSHLÁINEmAncient Irish
Old Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" and either slán "defiance" or Sláine, the Gaelic name of the River Slaney.
DUBHTHACHmAncient Irish
Old Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" in combination with a second element of unknown meaning.
DUBRAVKOmCroatian, Serbian
From the old Slavic word dubrava meaning "oak grove".
ĐỨCmVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (đức) meaning "virtue".
DUDAm & fPortuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO or EDUARDA.
DUDDAmAnglo-Saxon
Old English byname possibly meaning "round".
DUDELmYiddish
Yiddish diminutive of DAVID.
DUDLEYmEnglish
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "Dudda's clearing" in Old English. The surname was borne by a British noble family.
DUDUmPortuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO.
DUFFmScottish
Derived from Gaelic dubh meaning "dark".
DUGALDmScottish
Scottish variant of DOUGAL.
DUHAf & mArabic
Means "morning" in Arabic.
DUILIOmItalian, Spanish
From the Roman name Duilius, which is possibly derived from Latin duellum "war". This was the name of a Roman consul who defeated the Carthaginians in a naval battle.
DUKEmEnglish
From the noble title duke, which was originally derived from Latin dux "leader".
DUKVAKHAmChechen
Means "to live long", derived from Nakh duqa "many" and vakha "to live".
DULFmLimburgish
Limburgish short form of ADOLF.
DUMISANImSouthern African, Zulu, Ndebele
Means "praise" in Zulu and Ndebele.
DUMITRUmRomanian
Romanian form of DEMETRIUS.
DUNCANmScottish, English
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Donnchadh, derived from Gaelic donn "brown" and cath "battle". This was the name of two kings of Scotland, including the one who was featured in Shakespeare's play 'Macbeth' (1606).
DŨNGmVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (dũng) meaning "brave".
DUNSTANmEnglish (Rare), Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements dunn "dark" and stan "stone". This name was borne by a 10th-century saint, the archbishop of Canterbury. It was occasionally used in the Middle Ages, though it died out after the 16th century. It was revived by the Tractarian movement in the 19th century.
DƯƠNGmVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (dương) meaning "male, virile".
DURAImTamil
Means "chief, leader" in Tamil.
DURANSmLate Roman
Original Latin form of DURANTE.
DURANTEmItalian
Italian form of the Late Latin name Durans which meant "enduring".
DURGAf & mHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Telugu, Tamil
Means "unattainable" in Sanskrit. Durga is a Hindu warrior goddess, the fierce, twelve-armed, three-eyed form of the wife of Shiva. She is considered an incarnation of Parvati.
DURIf & mKorean
Means "two" in Korean (Gyeongsang dialect).
DURKmFrisian
Frisian variant of DIRK.
ĐUROmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of GEORGE.
DURWARDmEnglish
From an occupational surname which meant "door guard" in Middle English.
DUŠANmCzech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovak, Slovene, Macedonian
Derived from Slavic dusha meaning "soul, spirit".
DUSHYANTmIndian, Hindi
Modern form of DUSHYANTA.
DUSHYANTAmHinduism
Possibly means "destroyer of evil" in Sanskrit. In Hindu legend this is the name of a king who is the husband of Shakuntala and the father of Bharata.
DUSTINmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from the Old Norse given name Þórsteinn (see TORSTEN). The name was popularized by the actor Dustin Hoffman (1937-), who was apparently named after the earlier silent movie star Dustin Farnum (1874-1929).
DUSTYm & fEnglish
From a nickname originally given to people perceived as being dusty. It is also used a diminutive of DUSTIN. A famous bearer was British singer Dusty Springfield (1939-1999), who acquired her nickname as a child.
DUTCHmEnglish
From a nickname given to Americans of German descent. It is derived from Deutsch, the German word for the German people.
DUYGUm & fTurkish
Means "emotion, sensation" in Turkish.
DWAINmEnglish
Variant of DUANE.
DWAYNEmEnglish
Variant of DUANE.
DWIm & fIndonesian
Means "two, second" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit द्वि (dvi).
DWIGHTmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval feminine name Diot, a diminutive of Dionysia, the feminine form of DIONYSIUS. In America it was sometimes given in honour of Yale president Timothy Dwight (1752-1817). A famous bearer was the American president Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969).
DWYNmCeltic Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the Celtic god of love.
DYLANmWelsh, English, Welsh Mythology
From the Welsh elements dy meaning "great" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon.... [more]
DYSONmEnglish (Rare)
From an English surname which meant "son of DYE".
DŽAFERmBosnian
Bosnian form of JAFAR.
DZHABRAILmChechen
Chechen form of GABRIEL.
DZHAMALmChechen
Chechen form of JAMAL.
DZHOKHARmChechen
Possibly from Persian گوهر (gohar) "jewel, essence" or جوهر (johar) "essence, ink" (which comes from the same root, but via a loan to Arabic and retransmission to Persian).
DZMITRYmBelarusian
Belarusian form of DEMETRIUS.
DZVEZDANmMacedonian
Masculine form of DZVEZDA.
DZVONIMIRmMacedonian
Macedonian form of ZVONIMIR.
EA (1)mNear Eastern Mythology
Meaning unknown, perhaps from Sumerian meaning "house of water". This was the Akkadian and Babylonian name of the Sumerian water god Enki.
EACHANNmScottish, Irish
Means "brown horse" from Gaelic each "horse" and donn "brown". It was sometimes Anglicized as Hector.
EADBERHTmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and beorht "bright". This was the name of an 8th-century king of Northumbria and three kings of Kent.
EADBHÁRDmIrish
Irish form of EDWARD.
EADGARmAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDGAR.
EADMUNDmAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDMUND.
EADRICmAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDRIC.
EADWEARDmAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDWARD.
EADWIGmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wig "war". This was the name of a Saxon king of England in the 10th century. The name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
EADWINEmAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDWIN.
EADWULFmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wulf "wolf". This name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
EALAIRmScottish
Scottish Gaelic form of HILARY.
EALDRÆDmAnglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and ræd "counsel". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EALDWINEmAnglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EALHHEREmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ealh "temple" and here "army".
EALHSTANmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ealh "temple" combined with stan "stone".
ÉAMONmIrish
Variant of ÉAMONN. This name was borne by American-born Irish president Éamon de Valera (1882-1975), whose birth name was Edward.
EAMONmIrish
Variant of ÉAMONN.
ÉAMONNmIrish
Irish form of EDMUND.
EANmManx
Manx form of JOHN.
ÉANNAmIrish
Variant of ÉNNA.
EANRAIGmScottish
Scottish Gaelic form of HENRY.
EARDWULFmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element eard "land" combined with wulf "wolf".
EARLmEnglish
From the aristocratic title, which derives from Old English eorl "nobleman, warrior". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
EARLEmEnglish
Variant of EARL.
EARNESTmEnglish
Variant of ERNEST influenced by the spelling of the English word earnest.
EASTMUNDmAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of ESMOND.
EASTONmEnglish (Modern)
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning "east town" in Old English.
EBBEmDanish, Swedish, Norwegian, German (Rare)
Diminutive of EBERHARD and other names beginning with the Germanic element ebur meaning "wild boar". In Scandinavia it is also a diminutive of ESBEN.
EBENmEnglish
Short form of EBENEZER.
EBENEZERmBiblical
Means "stone of help" in Hebrew. This was the name of a monument erected by Samuel in the Old Testament. Charles Dickens used it for the miserly character Ebenezer Scrooge in his novel 'A Christmas Carol' (1843).
ÉBERmIrish Mythology
Old Irish form of ÉIBHEAR.
EBERARDOmSpanish
Spanish form of EVERARD.
EBERHARDmGerman, Ancient Germanic
German form of EVERARD. This name was borne by a 9th-century Duke of Friuli.
EBRAHIMmPersian, Arabic
Persian form of ABRAHAM. It is also a variant transcription of Arabic IBRAHIM.
EBU BEKİRmTurkish
Turkish form of ABU BAKR.
EBURWINmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic cognate of EOFORWINE.
ECGBERHTmAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of EGBERT.
ECKBERTmGerman (Rare)
German cognate of EGBERT.
EDmEnglish, Dutch
Short form of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDANmIrish, Scottish
Variant of AIDAN.
EDDIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDDYmEnglish
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDEmHungarian
Diminutive of EDVÁRD or EDUÁRD.
EDELMIROmSpanish
Spanish form of ADELMAR.
EDENf & mHebrew, English (Modern)
Means "place of pleasure" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament the Garden of Eden was the place where the first people, Adam and Eve, lived before they were expelled.
EDER (1)mBiblical
Means "flock" in Hebrew. This was the name of a son of Beriah in the Old Testament.
EDER (2)mBasque
Means "handsome, beautiful" in Basque.
EDGARmEnglish, French
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gar "spear". This was the name of a 10th-century English king, Edgar the Peaceful. The name did not survive long after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 18th century, in part due to a character by this name in Sir Walter Scott's novel 'The Bride of Lammermoor' (1819), which tells of the tragic love between Edgar Ravenswood and Lucy Ashton. Famous bearers include author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), French impressionist painter Edgar Degas (1834-1917), and author Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950).
EDGARASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of EDGAR.
EDGARDmFrench
French variant of EDGAR.
EDGARDOmSpanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of EDGAR.
EDImSlovene, Croatian
Slovene diminutive of EDVARD and a Croatian diminutive of EDUARD.
EDISONmEnglish
From an English surname which meant either "son of EDA (2)" or "son of ADAM". A famous bearer of the surname was the inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).
EDİZmTurkish
Means "high" in Turkish.
EDMAOmLimburgish
Limburgish form of EDMUND. Its spelling has been influenced by the French pronunciation of Edmond.
EDMONDmFrench
French form of EDMUND. A notable bearer was the English astronomer Edmond Halley (1656-1742), for whom Halley's comet is named.
EDMONDOmItalian
Italian form of EDMUND.
EDMUNDmEnglish, German, Polish
From the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and mund "protection". This was the name of two Anglo-Saxon kings of England. It was also borne by two saints, including a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman conquest (even being used by King Henry III for one of his sons), though it became less common after the 15th century.... [more]
EDMUNDOmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of EDMUND.
EDOARDOmItalian
Italian form of EDWARD.
EDOMmBiblical
Means "red" in Hebrew. According to the Old Testament, Esau was given this name because he traded his birthright for a helping of red broth. The bible goes on to tell that Esau was the founder of the ancient nation of Edom, located to the south of the kingdom of Judah.
EDORTAmBasque
Basque form of EDWARD.
ÉDOUARDmFrench
French form of EDWARD.
EDRICmEnglish (Rare)
From the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and ric "rule". After the Norman conquest this Old English name was not commonly used. It has occasionally been revived in modern times.
EDSELmVarious
Variant of ETZEL notably borne by Edsel Ford (1893-1943), the son of the American industrialist Henry Ford.
EDUmPortuguese
Portuguese short form of EDUARDO.
EDUÁRDmHungarian
Hungarian form of EDWARD.
EDUARDOmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of EDWARD.
EDUARDSmLatvian
Latvian form of EDWARD.
EDURmBasque
Means "snow" in Basque. It is a Basque equivalent of Nieves.
EDVÁRDmHungarian
Hungarian form of EDWARD.
EDVINmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian
Scandinavian, Finnish, Estonian and Hungarian form of EDWIN.
EDWARDmEnglish, Polish
Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and weard "guard". This was the name of several Anglo-Saxon kings, the last being Saint Edward the Confessor shortly before the Norman conquest in the 11th century. He was known as a just ruler, and because of his popularity his name remained in use after the conquest when most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. The 13th-century Plantagenet king Henry III named his son and successor after the saint, and seven subsequent kings of England were also named Edward.... [more]
EDWINmEnglish, Dutch
Means "rich friend" from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wine "friend". This was the name of a 7th-century Northumbrian king, regarded as a saint. After the Norman conquest the name was not popular, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century. A notable bearer was the astronaut Edwin Aldrin (1930-), also known as Buzz, the second man to walk on the moon.
EEFm & fDutch
Short form of names beginning with Ev, such as EVA or EVERT.
EELISmFinnish
Finnish form of ELIJAH.
EEMELImFinnish
Finnish form of EMIL.
EEMILmFinnish
Finnish form of EMIL.
EERIKmFinnish
Finnish form of ERIC.
EERIKKImFinnish
Finnish form of ERIC.
EEROmFinnish
Finnish form of ERIC. A famous bearer was the architect Eero Saarinen (1910-1961).
EETUmFinnish
Finnish form of EDWARD.
EFE (1)mTurkish
Means "older brother, brave" in Turkish.
EFE (2)m & fWestern African, Urhobo
Short form of EFEMENA or other names containing efe "wealth".
EFEMENAm & fWestern African, Urhobo
Means "here is my wealth" in Urhobo.
EFISIOmItalian
From the Latin byname Ephesius, which originally belonged to a person who was from the city of Ephesus in Ionia. This was the name of a saint martyred on Sardinia in the 4th century.
EFRAÍNmSpanish
Spanish form of EPHRAIM.
EFSTATHIOSmGreek
Modern Greek form of EUSTATHIOS.
EGBERTmEnglish, Dutch
Means "bright edge" from the Old English elements ecg "edge of a sword" and beorht "bright". This was the name of kings of Kent and Wessex as well as two English saints. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest but was revived in the 19th century.
EGEMENmTurkish
Means "dominant" in Turkish.
EGIDIJUSmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of Aegidius (see GILES).
EGÍDIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of Aegidius (see GILES).
EGIDIOmItalian
Italian form of Aegidius (see GILES).
EGILmNorwegian, Swedish, Danish
From the Old Norse name Egill, a diminutive of names that began with the element agi "awe, terror". This was the name of a semi-legendary Icelandic warrior.
EGILHARDmAncient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements agil "edge of a sword" and hard "brave, hardy".
EGILLmAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of EGIL.
EGONmGerman
Derived from the Germanic element ag, which means "edge of a sword".
EGUZKImBasque
Means "sun" in Basque.
EHECATLmAztec and Toltec Mythology, Native American, Nahuatl
Means "wind" in Nahuatl. Ehecatl was the name of the Aztec wind god.
EHMETmUyghur
Uyghur form of AHMAD.
EHSANm & fPersian
Persian form of IHSAN.
EHUDmBiblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Meaning unknown, possibly related to Hebrew אֶחָד ('echad) meaning "one". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the biblical judges. He killed Eglon, the king of Moab, and freed the city of Jericho from Moabite rule.
ÉIBHEARmIrish, Irish Mythology
Meaning unknown. According to Irish legend this name belonged to two of the sons of Míl, Éibhear Dunn and Éibhear Finn, the first of the Gaels to conquer Ireland.
EIDEARDmScottish
Scottish form of EDWARD.
EIFIONmWelsh
Meaning unknown. This was an old Welsh name that was revived in the 19th century.
EIKEmGerman
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ag "edge".
EILERTmFrisian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Frisian and Scandinavian form of EGILHARD.
ÉIMHÍNmIrish
Possibly means "swift, prompt" in Irish Gaelic.
EINARmNorwegian, Icelandic, Swedish, Danish
From the Old Norse name Einarr, derived from the elements ein "one, alone" and arr "warrior". This name shares the same roots as einherjar, the word for the slain warriors in Valhalla.
EINDRIDEmNorwegian
Derived from the Old Norse name Eindriði, possibly from the elements ein "one, alone" and ríða "to ride".
EINIONmWelsh
Probably from the Latin name Ennianus, a derivative of Ennius (see ENNIO). It is also a modern Welsh word meaning "anvil". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh king who is considered a saint in some Christian traditions.
EINOmFinnish
Meaning unknown, possibly a Finnish form of a Scandinavian name.
EINRÍmIrish
Irish form of HENRY.
EIRIANf & mWelsh
Means "bright, beautiful" in Welsh.
EIRIKmNorwegian
Norwegian form of Eiríkr (see ERIC).
EIRÍKURmIcelandic
Icelandic form of Eiríkr (see ERIC).
EITANmHebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of ETHAN.
EIŽENSmLatvian
Latvian form of Eugenius (see EUGENE).
EJDERmTurkish
Means "dragon" in Turkish, of Persian origin.
EJIROm & fWestern African, Urhobo
Short form of EJIROGHENE or other names containing ejiro "praise".
EJIROGHENEm & fWestern African, Urhobo
Means "praise God" in Urhobo.
EJVINDmDanish
Danish form of ØYVIND.
EKA (1)m & fIndonesian
Means "one, first" in Indonesian, ultimately from Sanskrit एक (eka).
EKAINmBasque
Means "June (the month)" in Basque.
EKAITZmBasque
Means "storm" in Basque.
EKBERmTurkish
Turkish form of AKBAR.
EKENEm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "praise, thanks" in Igbo.
EKENEDILICHUKWUm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "all praise to God" in Igbo.
EKEWAKAmHawaiian
Hawaiian form of EDWARD.
EKKEBERTmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ECKBERT.
EKKEHARDmGerman, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ag "edge" and hard "brave, hardy".
EKOm & fIndonesian, Javanese
Javanese form of EKA (1).
EKREMmTurkish
Turkish form of AKRAM.
EKUNDAYOf & mWestern African, Yoruba
Means "sorrow becomes joy" in Yoruba.
EKWUEMEmWestern African, Igbo
Means "he says, he does" in Igbo.
ELmNear Eastern Mythology
From a Semitic word meaning "god", perhaps originally derived from a root meaning "power". This was the name of the chief Semitic god, the father of the gods and mankind. In some cases it was used as a title and applied to other gods of the pantheon. It was used by the Hebrews to refer to Yahweh.
ELADIOmSpanish
Spanish form of HELLADIUS.
ELAHf & mHebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "oak tree" or "terebinth tree" in Hebrew. This was the name of the fourth king of Israel, as told in the Old Testament. He was murdered by Zimri, who succeeded him. In modern Hebrew this is typically a feminine name.
ELAMmBiblical
Possibly means either "hidden" or "eternity" in Hebrew. This was the name of several characters in the Old Testament, including a son of Shem who was the ancestor of the Elamite peoples.
ELAZARmHebrew
Modern Hebrew transcription of ELEAZAR.
ELBERTmDutch
Dutch variant of ADELBERT.
ELCHINmAzerbaijani
Variant transcription of ELÇIN.
ELÇINmAzerbaijani
Possibly means "ambassador" in Azerbaijani.
ELDADmBiblical
Means "God has loved" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is one of the two elders who prophesizes in the Israelite camp.
ELDARmAzerbaijani
From Turkic el meaning "country, society" combined with the Persian suffix دار (dar) meaning "possessor".
ELDONmEnglish
From a surname which was from a place name meaning "Ella's hill" in Old English.
ELDREDmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from EALDRÆD.
ELEAZARmBiblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name אֶלְעָזָר ('El'azar) meaning "my God has helped". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the sons of Aaron.
ELEFTHERIOSmGreek
Modern Greek form of Eleutherios (see ELEUTHERIUS).
ELEKmHungarian
Hungarian form of ALEXIS.
ELEUTERIOmSpanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of ELEUTHERIUS.
ELEUTHERIOSmLate Greek
Original Greek form of ELEUTHERIUS.
ELEUTHERIUSmLate Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ελευθεριος (Eleutherios) which meant "free". This was the name of a 2nd-century pope, as well as several saints.
ELI (1)mEnglish, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
Means "ascension" in Hebrew. In the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament he is a high priest of the Israelites. He took the young Samuel into his service and gave him guidance when God spoke to him. Because of the misdeeds of his sons, Eli and his descendants were cursed to die before reaching old age.... [more]
ELI (2)mHebrew
Means "my God" in Hebrew.
ELIAmItalian, Dutch
Italian and Dutch form of ELIJAH.
ELIAKIMmBiblical
Means "God rises" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the master of Hezekiah's household.
ELIÁNmVarious
In the case of Elian Gonzalez it is a combination of ELIZABETH and JUAN (1), the names of his parents.
ELIANm & fDutch
Dutch variant of names beginning with Eli, such as ELIJAH or ELISABETH.
ÉLIÁSmHungarian
Hungarian form of ELIJAH.
ELÍASmSpanish, Icelandic
Spanish and Icelandic form of ELIJAH.
ELIASmPortuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Cognate of ELIJAH. This is the form used in the Greek New Testament.
ELIASZmPolish
Polish form of ELIJAH.
ÉLIEmFrench
French form of ELIJAH.
ELIEZERmBiblical, Hebrew, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Hebrew אֱלִיעֶזֶר ('Eli'ezer) meaning "my God is help". In the Old Testament this is the name of both a servant of Abraham and one of the sons of Moses (see Exodus 18:4 for an explanation of the significance of the name).
ELIGIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of ELIGIUS.
ELIGIUSmLate Roman
Late Latin name derived from Latin eligere "to choose". The 7th-century Saint Eligius is the patron saint of metalworkers.
ELIGIUSZmPolish
Polish form of ELIGIUS.
ELIHUmBiblical, Biblical Hebrew, English (Archaic)
Means "my God is he" in Hebrew. This was the name of several characters in the Old Testament including one of the friends of Job.
ELIJAHmEnglish, Hebrew, Biblical
From the Hebrew name אֱלִיָּהוּ ('Eliyyahu) meaning "my God is YAHWEH", derived from the elements אֵל (el) and יָה (yah), both referring to the Hebrew God. Elijah was a Hebrew prophet and miracle worker, as told in the two Books of Kings in the Old Testament. He was active in the 9th century BC during the reign of King Ahab of Israel and his Phoenician-born queen Jezebel. Elijah confronted the king and queen over their idolatry of the Canaanite god Ba'al and other wicked deeds. At the end of his life he was carried to heaven in a chariot of fire, and was succeeded by Elisha. In the New Testament, Elijah and Moses appear next to Jesus when he is transfigured.... [more]
ELIOmItalian
Italian form of AELIUS or HELIOS.
ELIODOROmItalian
Italian form of HELIODORO.
ELIOENAImBiblical
Means "my eyes look to God" in Hebrew. This was the name of several minor characters in the Old Testament.
ELIORmHebrew
Means "my God is my light" in Hebrew.
ELIOTmEnglish
From a surname which was a variant of ELLIOTT. A famous bearer of the surname was T. S. Eliot (1888-1965), an Anglo-American poet and dramatist, the writer of 'The Waste Land'. As a given name, it was borne by the American mob-buster Eliot Ness (1903-1957).
ELIOTTmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of ELLIOTT.
ELIOUmBiblical Greek
Form of ELIJAH used in the Greek Old Testament.
ELIPHALETmBiblical
Variant of ELIPHELET used in some versions of the Old Testament to refer to the son of David.
ELIPHELETmBiblical
Means "God is release" in Hebrew. This is the name of several people in the Old Testament including a son of David.
ELISmSwedish, Medieval English
Swedish variant of ELIAS, as well as the Medieval English form.
ELISAIEmBiblical Greek
Form of ELISHA used in the Greek Old Testament.
ELISEDDmAncient Celtic
Derived from Welsh elus meaning "kind". This was the name of two kings of Powys in Wales.
ELISEOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of ELISHA.
ELISHAmBiblical, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew name אֱלִישַׁע ('Elisha'), a contracted form of אֱלִישׁוּעַ ('Elishu'a) meaning "my God is salvation". According to the Old Testament, Elisha was a prophet and miracle worker. He was the attendant of Elijah and succeeded him after his ascension to heaven.
ELISHUAmBiblical, Biblical Hebrew
From Hebrew אֱלִישׁוּעַ ('Elishu'a), an extended form of אֱלִישַׁע (see ELISHA). In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of King David.
ELISIEmMacedonian
Macedonian form of ELISHA.
ELIUDmBiblical
Greek form of a Hebrew name meaning "God is grandeur". The Gospel of Matthew lists him as an ancestor of Jesus.
ELIYAHUmHebrew
Variant transcription of ELIYYAHU.
ELJASmFinnish
Finnish form of ELIJAH.
ELKANmHebrew
Modern variant of ELKANAH.
ELKANAHmBiblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "God has purchased" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the father of Samuel.
ELLANHERmAncient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements aljan "strength, power" and hari "army, warrior".
ELLARmScottish
Anglicized form of EALAIR.
ELLERYmEnglish
From an English surname which was originally derived from the medieval masculine name HILARY.
ELLIOTmEnglish
From a surname which was a variant of ELLIOTT.
ELLIOTTmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of the medieval name ELIAS.
ELLIS (1)mEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from the given name ELIJAH.
ELLIS (2)mWelsh
Anglicized form of ELISEDD.
ELMARmGerman
Descended from various Germanic names such as Agilmar, which was derived from the elements agil "edge (of a sword), blade" and mari "famous".
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