Masculine Names

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HARUKA f & m Japanese
From Japanese (haruka) meaning "distant, remote". It can also come from (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Additionally, other kanji combinations can form this name.
HARUKI m Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "clear weather" or (haru) meaning "light, sun, male" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness" or (ki) meaning "living". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HARUN m Arabic, Turkish, Bosnian
Arabic form of AARON. Harun al-Rashid was a 9th-century Abbasid caliph featured in the stories of The 1001 Nights.
HARUTO m Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "distant, remote" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (to), which refers to a Chinese constellation, or (to) meaning "soar, fly". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
HARVE m English
Short form of HARVEY.
HARVEY m English
From the Breton given name Haerviu, which meant "battle worthy", from haer "battle" and viu "worthy". This was the name of a 6th-century Breton hermit who is the patron saint of the blind. Settlers from Brittany introduced it to England after the Norman Conquest. During the later Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HARVIE m English
Variant of HARVEY.
HASAN m Arabic, Turkish, Persian, Urdu, Punjabi, Bengali, Indonesian
Means "handsome" in Arabic, from the root حَسُنَ (hasuna) meaning "to be beautiful, to be good". Hasan was the son of Ali and the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad. He was poisoned by one of his wives and is regarded as a martyr by Shia Muslims. This was also the name of two kings of Morocco. It is sometimes transcribed as Hassan, though this is a distinct name in Arabic.
HASDRUBAL m Phoenician (Latinized), History
Means "Ba'al helps" from Phoenician azru "help" combined with the name of the god BA'AL. Hasdrubal was a Carthaginian general, the brother of Hannibal.
HASHEM m Persian
Persian form of HASHIM.
HASHIM m Arabic
Means "crusher, breaker" in Arabic. This was the nickname of a great-grandfather of the Prophet Muhammad. He acquired this nickname because of his practice of crumbling bread and giving it to pilgrims.
HASIB m Arabic
Means "noble, respected" in Arabic.
HAŞİM m Turkish
Turkish form of HASHIM.
HASIM m Arabic
Means "decisive" in Arabic, derived from حسم (hasama) meaning "to sever, to finish, to decide".
HASİP m Turkish
Turkish form of HASIB.
HASKEL m Yiddish (Rare)
Yiddish variant of EZEKIEL.
HASSAN m Arabic, Persian, Urdu
Means "beautifier, improver" in Arabic. Hassan ibn Thabit was a 7th-century poet who was a companion of the Prophet Muhammad. This name is sometimes transcribed as Hasan, though the two names are spelled distinctly in Arabic.
HASSE m Swedish
Swedish diminutive of HANS.
HASSO m German
German diminutive of HADUBERT.
HATIM m Arabic
Means "determined, decisive" in Arabic.
HAUL m Welsh
Means "sun" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
HÅVARD m Norwegian
Norwegian form of HÁVARÐR.
HÁVARÐR m Ancient Scandinavian
From the Old Norse elements "high" and varðr "guardian, defender".
HAVEL m Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of GALLUS.
HAVEN f & m English
From the English word for a safe place, derived ultimately from Old English hæfen.
HAVILAH m Biblical
Probably means "to dance, to circle, to twist" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is both a place name and a masculine personal name.
HAVRYIL m Ukrainian (Rare)
Ukrainian form of GABRIEL.
HAYATE m Japanese
From Japanese (hayate) meaning "sudden, sound of the wind". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name.
HAYATİ m Turkish
Means "vital" in Turkish.
HAYATO m Japanese
From Japanese (haya) meaning "falcon" and (to) meaning "person". Other kanji combinations can also make up this name.
HAYDAR m Turkish
Turkish form of HAIDAR.
HAYDEN m & f English
From an English surname that was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HAYDER m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حيدر (see HAIDAR).
HAYDN m English (British)
From a German surname meaning "heathen". It is used in honour of the Austrian composer Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809).
HAYES m English
From a surname, either HAYES (1) or HAYES (2). It was borne by American president Rutherford B. Hayes (1822-1893).
HAYIM m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew חַיִּים (see CHAYIM).
HAYK m Armenian
Probably from the Armenian word հայ (hay) meaning "Armenian", although some hold that the ethnic name is in fact derived from the given name. This was the name of the legendary forefather of the Armenian people, supposedly a great-great-grandson of Noah.
HAYRİ m Turkish
Means "useful man" in Turkish.
HAYTHAM m Arabic
Means "young eagle" in Arabic.
HAYWOOD m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "fenced wood" in Old English.
HAYYIM m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew חַיִּים (see CHAYIM).
HAZAEL m Biblical
Means "God sees" in Hebrew. This is the name of a king of Aram in the Old Testament.
HE f & m Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "river, stream", () meaning "harmony, peace", or () meaning "lotus, water lily" (which is usually only feminine). Other characters can form this name as well. A famous bearer was the 15th-century explorer Zheng He.
HEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Short form of various Old English names containing the element heard meaning "brave, hardy".
HEATH m English
From an English surname that denoted one who lived on a heath. It was popularized as a given name by the character Heath Barkley from the 1960s television series The Big Valley.
HEBEL m Hebrew
Alternate transcription of Hebrew הֶבֶל (see HEVEL).
HEBER (1) m Irish
Anglicized form of ÉIBHEAR.
HEBER (2) m Biblical
Means "enclave" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this name is borne by a great-grandson of Jacob and also by the husband of Jael.
HECK m Scottish
Scottish short form of HECTOR.
HECKIE m Scottish
Scottish diminutive of HECTOR.
HÉCTOR m Spanish
Spanish form of HECTOR.
HÈCTOR m Catalan
Catalan form of HECTOR.
HECTOR m English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance
Latinized form of Greek ‘Εκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ‘εκτωρ (hektor) meaning "holding fast", ultimately from εχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess". In Greek legend Hector was one of the Trojan champions who fought against the Greeks. After he killed Achilles' friend Patroclus in battle, he was himself brutally slain by Achilles, who proceeded to tie his dead body to a chariot and drag it about. This name also appears in Arthurian legends belonging to King Arthur's foster father.... [more]
HED m & f Hebrew
Means "echo" in Hebrew.
HEDDWYN m Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements hedd "peace" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed".
HÉDI (2) m Arabic (Maghrebi)
Alternate transcription of Arabic هادي (see HADI) chiefly used in Tunisia (using French-influenced orthography).
HEDLEY m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "heather clearing" in Old English.
HEFIN m Welsh
Means "summer" in Welsh.
HEIDRICH m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements heid "kind, sort, type" and ric "ruler, mighty".
HEIKE f & m Low German, Frisian, Dutch
Low German diminutive of HENRIKE or HEINRICH.
HEIKKI m Finnish
Finnish form of HENRY.
HEIKO m Low German, Frisian, Dutch
Low German diminutive of HEINRICH.
HEILYN m Welsh
Means "winebearer" in Welsh.
HEIMIR m Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Norse cognate of HAMA. In the Volsungasaga he is a king of Hlymdalir.
HEIMIRICH m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HENRY.
HEIN m Dutch
Diminutive of HENDRIK.
HEINER m German
Diminutive of HEINRICH.
HEINO m German, Dutch, Danish, Finnish, Estonian
German form of Haimo (see HAMO).
HEINRICH m German, Ancient Germanic
German form of HENRY. This was the name of several German kings.
HEINZ m German
Diminutive of HEINRICH.
HEITOR m Portuguese
Portuguese form of HECTOR.
HEKTOR m Greek Mythology
Greek form of HECTOR.
HÉLDER m Portuguese
Meaning uncertain. It was borne by the Brazilian archbishop Dom Hélder Câmara (1909-1999) who was noted for his charity. It could be from the name of the Dutch town of Den Helder (possibly meaning "hell's door" in Dutch). Alternatively, it might be derived from the Germanic given name HULDERIC.
HELGE m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Helgi, derived from heilagr meaning "holy, blessed".
HELGI m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of HELGE.
HELI (1) m Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latin form of ELI (1) used in the Old and New Testament. This form of the name is used in most English versions of the New Testament to refer to the father of Joseph (husband of Mary) in the genealogy in the Gospel of Luke.
HELIAS m Biblical Latin
Latin form of ELIJAH used in some versions of the Vulgate.
HELIODORO m Spanish, Portuguese
From the Greek name ‘Ηλιοδωρος (Heliodoros), derived from the elements ‘ηλιος (helios) meaning "sun" and δωρον (doron) meaning "gift". Saint Heliodoro was a 4th-century bishop of Altino.
HELIOS m Greek Mythology
Means "sun" in Greek. This was the name of the young Greek sun god, a Titan, who rode across the sky each day in a chariot pulled by four horses. His sister was the moon goddess Selene.
HELLADIUS m Late Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Late Greek name ‘Ελλαδιος (Helladios), which was derived from ‘Ελλαδος (Hellados) meaning "of Greece". Saint Helladius was a 7th-century archbishop of Toledo.
HELMFRID m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HELMFRIED.
HELMFRIED m German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements helm "helmet" and frid "peace".
HELMO m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ELMO.
HELMOLD m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements helm "helmet" and wald "rule".
HELMUT m German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element helm "helmet" or heil "healthy" combined with muot "spirit, mind".
HELMUTH m German
Variant of HELMUT.
HEMI m Maori
Maori form of JAMES.
HEMMING m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Perhaps derived from Old Norse hamr "shape", and possibly originally a nickname for a person believed to be a shape changer.
HENDERSON m English
From a Scottish surname meaning "son of HENRY".
HENDRICK m Dutch (Archaic)
Dutch variant of HENDRIK.
HENDRIK m Dutch, German, Estonian
Dutch and Estonian cognate of HENRY.
HENDRIX m English (Modern)
From a Dutch surname that was derived from the given name HENDRIK. A famous bearer of the surname was the American rock musician Jimi Hendrix (1942-1970).
HENDRY m Scottish
Scots variant of HENRY.
HENG m & f Chinese
From Chinese (héng) meaning "constant, persistent", as well as other characters with a similar pronunciation.
HENGIST m Ancient Germanic
Of Germanic origin, meaning "stallion". According to medieval histories, Hengist and his brother Horsa were the leaders of the first Saxon settlers in Britain. Hengist established a kingdom in Kent in the 5th century.
HENK m Dutch
Dutch short form of HENDRIK.
HENNADIY m Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of GENNADIUS.
HENNIE m & f Dutch
Dutch diminutive and feminine form of HENDRIK.
HENNY m & f Dutch
Dutch diminutive and feminine form of HENDRIK.
HENRI m French, Finnish
French form of HENRY.
HENRICH m Slovak
Slovak form of HENRY.
HENRIK m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Armenian
Form of HENRY in several languages. A famous bearer was the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906).
HENRIKAS m Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of HENRY.
HENRIKKI m Finnish
Finnish form of HENRY.
HENRIQUE m Portuguese
Portuguese form of HENRY. This was the name of a 15th-century Portuguese naval explorer (known as Henry the Navigator in English).
HENRY m English
From the Germanic name Heimirich meaning "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".... [more]
HENRYK m Polish
Polish form of HENRY.
HEORHIY m Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of GEORGE.
HEPHAESTUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek ‘Ηφαιστος (Hephaistos), meaning unknown. It probably shares its origin with the Minoan city of Φαιστος (Phaistos), which is of Pre-Greek origin. In Greek mythology Hephaestus was the god of fire and forging, the husband of the unfaithful Aphrodite. It was said that when he was born Hera, his mother, was so displeased with his physical deformities that she hurled him off the top of Mount Olympus.
HERACLEITUS m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Ηρακλειτος (Herakleitos) meaning "glory of Hera", derived from the name of the goddess HERA combined with κλειτος (kleitos) meaning "glory". This was the name of a 6th-century BC Greek philosopher from Ephesus.
HERACLES m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of HERAKLES. However, the spelling used by the Romans was Hercules.
HERACLIO m Spanish
Spanish form of HERACLIUS.
HERACLIUS m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek personal name ‘Ηρακλειος (Herakleios), which was derived from the name of the Greek hero HERAKLES. This was the name of a 7th-century Byzantine emperor, known for his victories over the Sassanid Persian Empire. This name was also borne by two early saints.
HERAKLEIDES m Ancient Greek
Means "son of Herakles" in Greek, derived from the name of the mythic hero HERAKLES combined with the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides).
HERAKLES m Greek Mythology
Means "glory of Hera" from the name of the goddess HERA combined with Greek κλεος (kleos) meaning "glory". This was the name of a hero in Greek and Roman mythology, the son of Zeus and the mortal woman Alcmene. After being driven insane by Hera and killing his own children, Herakles completed twelve labours in order to atone for his crime and become immortal.
HERB m English
Short form of HERBERT.
HERBERT m English, German, Dutch, French, Swedish
Derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Herebeorht. In the course of the Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HERBERTO m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of HERBERT.
HERBIE m English
Diminutive of HERBERT.
HERCULE m French
French form of HERCULES.
HEREMOANA m Tahitian
From Tahitian here "loved, dear" and moana "ocean".
HEREWARD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements here "army" and weard "guard". This was the name of an 11th-century Anglo-Saxon leader who rebelled against Norman rule.
HEREWEALD m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of HAROLD.
HERIBERT m German
German form of HERBERT.
HERIBERTO m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of HERBERT.
HERK m Various
Short form of HERCULES.
HERKUS m Lithuanian
Short form of HENRIKAS.
HERLEIF m Norwegian
Modern Scandinavian form of HERLEIFR.
HERLEIFR m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements herr "army" and leifr "son, descendant".
HERMAGORAS m Ancient Greek
From the name of the messenger god HERMES combined with Greek αγορα (agora) meaning "assembly, marketplace". Saint Hermagoras (3rd century) was the first bishop of Aquileia in Italy.
HERMAN m English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
Means "army man", derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and man "man". It was introduced to England by the Normans, died out, and was revived in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. It was borne by an 18th-century Russian missionary to Alaska who is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, though in his case the name is an alternate transcription of GERMAN. Another famous bearer was the American writer Herman Melville (1819-1891), the author of Moby-Dick.
HERMANN m German
German form of HERMAN.
HERMANNI m Finnish
Finnish form of HERMAN.
HERMENEGILDO m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of a Visigothic name meaning "complete sacrifice", from the Germanic elements ermen "whole, entire" and gild "sacrifice, value". It was borne by a 6th-century saint, the son of Liuvigild the Visigothic king of Hispania.
HERMES m Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Probably from Greek ‘ερμα (herma) meaning "cairn, pile of stones, boundary marker". Hermes was a Greek god associated with speed and good luck, who served as a messenger to Zeus and the other gods. He was also the patron of travellers, writers, athletes, merchants, thieves and orators.... [more]
HERMÍNIO m Portuguese
Portuguese form of HERMINIUS.
HERMINIO m Spanish
Spanish form of HERMINIUS.
HERMINIUS m Ancient Roman
Roman name that was possibly of unknown Etruscan origin, but could also be derived from the name of the god HERMES. In Roman legend this was the name of a companion of Aeneas.
HERMOGENES m Ancient Greek
Means "born of Hermes" from the name of the messenger god HERMES combined with Greek γενης (genes) meaning "born".
HERMOKRATES m Ancient Greek
Means "power of Hermes" from the name of the messenger god HERMES combined with Greek κρατος (kratos) meaning "power".
HERMOLAOS m Ancient Greek
Means "the people of Hermes" from the name of the messenger god HERMES combined with Greek λαος (laos) meaning "people".
HERNÁN m Spanish
Short form of HERNANDO.
HERNANDO m Spanish
Medieval Spanish form of FERDINAND. A famous bearer of this name was Hernando Cortés (1485-1547), a Spanish conquistador.
HEROD m Biblical
From the Greek name ‘Ηρωιδης (Heroides), which probably means "song of the hero" from ‘ηρως (heros) meaning "hero, warrior" combined with ωιδη (oide) meaning "song, ode". This was the name of several rulers of Judea during the period when it was part of the Roman Empire. This includes two who appear in the New Testament: Herod the Great, the king who ordered the slaughter of the children, and his son Herod Antipas, who had John the Baptist beheaded.
HERODES m Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Latin form of HEROD, as well as the usual biblical Greek transcription of ‘Ηρωιδης: after the classical period, the ι in the sequence ωι (often written as a subscript) was not pronounced.
HERODION m Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Diminutive of the Greek name Heroides (see HEROD). This name is mentioned briefly in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament.
HERODOTUS m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Ηροδοτος (Herodotos), derived from the name of the goddess HERA combined with δοτος (dotos) meaning "given, granted". Herodotus was a Greek historian of the 5th century BC who wrote the Histories, a detailed account of the Greco-Persian Wars. He is known as the Father of History.
HEROIDES m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of HEROD.
HEROIDION m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of HERODION.
HERON m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ‘ηρως (heros) meaning "hero". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek inventor (also known as Hero) from Alexandria.
HERRY m Medieval English
Medieval English form of HENRY. Unlike Harry, this form is no longer used.
HERSH m Yiddish
Alternate transcription of Yiddish הירש (see HIRSH).
HERSHEL m American, Yiddish
Yiddish diminutive of HIRSH. As a non-Jewish American name (somewhat common around the end of the 19th century), it was likely inspired by the German surname HERSCHEL, borne for instance by the British-German astronomer William Herschel (1738-1822).
HERU m Egyptian Mythology (Hypothetical)
Reconstructed Egyptian form of HORUS.
HERVE m Breton
Breton form of HARVEY.
HERVÉ m French
French form of HARVEY.
HERVEY m English
Variant of HARVEY.
HESEKIEL m Finnish (Rare)
Finnish form of EZEKIEL.
HESHAM m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic هشام (see HISHAM).
HESHEL m Yiddish (Rare)
Yiddish diminutive of HIRSH.
HESIOD m Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name ‘Ησιοδος (Hesiodos), which probably meant "to throw song" from ‘ιημι (hiemi) meaning "to throw, to speak" and ωιδη (oide) meaning "song, ode". This was the name of an 8th-century BC Greek poet.
HESIODOS m Ancient Greek
Greek form of HESIOD.
HESPEROS m Ancient Greek
Means "evening" in Greek. This was the name of the personification of the Evening Star (the planet Venus) in Greek mythology.
HEVEL m Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of ABEL.
HEYDAR m Persian
Persian form of HAIDAR.
HEZEKIAH m Biblical
From the Hebrew name חִזְקִיָהוּ (Chizqiyahu), which means "YAHWEH strengthens", from the roots חָזַק (chazaq) meaning "to strength" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God. This name was borne by a powerful king of Judah who reigned in the 8th and 7th centuries BC. Also in the Old Testament, this is the name of an ancestor of the prophet Zephaniah.
HIAWATHA m History, Native American, Iroquois
From the Iroquoian name Haio-went-ha meaning "he who combs". This was the name of a Mohawk or Onondaga leader who founded the Iroquois Confederacy, possibly in the 15th century. He was later the subject of a fictionalized 1855 poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.
HIBIKI m & f Japanese
From Japanese (hibiki) meaning "sound, echo".
HIDAYAT m Arabic, Indonesian
Means "guidance" in Arabic.
HIDDE m Frisian
Frisian short form of names containing the Germanic element hild meaning "battle".
HIDEAKI m Japanese
From Japanese (hide) meaning "excellent, fine" and (aki) meaning "bright", as well as other combinations of kanji.
HIDEKI m Japanese
From Japanese (hide) meaning "excellent, outstanding" or (hide) meaning "excellent, fine" combined with (ki) meaning "tree". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
HIDEYOSHI m Japanese
From Japanese (hide) meaning "excellent, outstanding" combined with (yoshi) meaning "good, virtuous, respectable" or (yoshi) meaning "good luck". Other kanji combinations are possible. Toyotomi Hideyoshi (Hideyoshi being his given name) was a 16th-century daimyo who unified Japan and attempted to conquer Korea. He also banned the ownership of weapons by the peasantry, and banished Christian missionaries.
HIENADZ m Belarusian
Belarusian form of GENNADIUS.
HIERONYMOS m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of JEROME.
HIERONYMUS m German, Dutch (Archaic), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latin form of JEROME used in Germany and the Netherlands. Hieronymus Bosch was a 15th-century Dutch painter known for his depictions of the torments of hell.
HIEU m Biblical Latin
Latin form of JEHU.
HIEZECIHEL m Biblical Latin
Biblical Latin form of EZEKIEL.
HIFUMI m & f Japanese
From Japanese (hi) meaning "one", (fu) meaning "two" and (mi) meaning "three".
HIGINI m Catalan (Rare)
Catalan form of HYGINUS.
HIKARI f & m Japanese
From Japanese (hikari) meaning "light". Other kanji can also form this name. It is often written with the hiragana writing system.
HIKARU m & f Japanese
From Japanese (hikaru) meaning "light" or (hikaru) meaning "brightness". Other kanji can also form this name.
HIKMAT m & f Arabic
Derived from Arabic حكمة (hikmah) meaning "wisdom".
HİKMET m Turkish
Turkish form of HIKMAT.
HILAIRE m French
French form of HILARIUS.
HILAL m & f Arabic, Turkish
Means "crescent moon" in Arabic, also referring to the new moon on the Islamic calendar. As a given name it is typically masculine in Arabic and feminine in Turkish.
HILARIO m Spanish
Spanish form of HILARIUS.
HILARION m Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ‘ιλαρος (hilaros) meaning "cheerful". This was the name of a 4th-century saint, a disciple of Saint Anthony.
HILARIUS m Ancient Roman
Roman name derived from Latin hilaris meaning "cheerful". Alternatively, it could be derived from the Greek name ‘Ιλαρος (Hilaros) also meaning "cheerful" (the Greek word ‘ιλαρος was the source of the Latin word hilaris). Saint Hilarius was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Poitiers. This was also the name of a 5th-century pope.
HILARY f & m English
Medieval English form of HILARIUS or HILARIA. During the Middle Ages it was primarily a masculine name. It was revived in Britain at the beginning of the 20th century as a predominantly feminine name. In America, this name and the variant Hillary seemed to drop in popularity after Hillary Clinton (1947-) became the first lady.
HILDEBERT m German (Rare)
Means "bright battle" from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and beraht "bright".
HILDEBRAND m German (Archaic), Ancient Germanic
Means "battle sword", derived from the Germanic element hild "battle" combined with brand "sword". This was the name of the hero of an 8th-century poem written in Old High German.
HILDEFONS m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ILDEFONSO.
HILDIBERHT m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HILDEBERT.
HILDIMAR m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HILMAR.
HILDRÆD m Anglo-Saxon
Older form of HILDRED.
HILDRED f & m English
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel". This name was revived in the late 19th century, probably because of its similarity to the popular names Hilda and Mildred.
HILLAR m Estonian
Estonian form of HILARIUS.
HILLEL m Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Derived from Hebrew הָלַל (halal) meaning "praise". This name is mentioned briefly in the Old Testament as the father of the judge Abdon. It was also borne by the 1st-century BC Jewish scholar Hillel the Elder.
HILMAR m German, Icelandic, Norwegian, Danish
From the Germanic name Hildimar, derived from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and mari "famous".
HINATA f & m Japanese
From Japanese 日向 (hinata) meaning "sunny place", 陽向 (hinata) meaning "toward the sun", or a non-standard reading of 向日葵 (himawari) meaning "sunflower". Other kanji compounds are also possible. Because of the irregular readings, this name is often written using the hiragana writing system.
HINNERK m Low German
Low German form of HEINRICH.
HINRICH m Low German
Low German form of HEINRICH.
HINRIK m Icelandic
Icelandic form of HENRY.
HIOB m Biblical German
German form of JOB.
HIPOLIT m Polish
Polish form of HIPPOLYTOS.
HIPÓLITO m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of HIPPOLYTOS.
HIPPOCRATES m Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Ιπποκρατης (Hippokrates) meaning "horse power", derived from the elements ‘ιππος (hippos) meaning "horse" and κρατος (kratos) meaning "power". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek doctor who is known as the Father of Medicine.
HIPPOLYTOS m Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Means "freer of horses" from Greek ‘ιππος (hippos) meaning "horse" and λυω (luo) meaning "to loosen". In Greek legend he was the son of Theseus who was tragically loved by his stepmother Phaedra. This was also the name of a 3rd-century theologian, saint and martyr.
HIRA f & m Urdu, Nepali, Punjabi, Indian, Gujarati, Hindi
Derived from Sanskrit हीर (hira) meaning "diamond". It is typically feminine in Pakistan and unisex in India and Nepal.
HIRAH m Biblical
Means "splendour" in Hebrew. This was the name of a companion of Judah in the Old Testament.
HIRAKU m Japanese
From Japanese (hiraku) meaning "expand, open, support". Other kanji can also form this name.
HIRAM m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English
Probably of Phoenician origin, though it could be from Hebrew meaning "exalted brother". This was the name of a king of Tyre in the Old Testament. As an English given name, Hiram came into use after the Protestant Reformation. In the 17th century the Puritans brought it to America, where it gained some currency.
HIROKI m Japanese
From Japanese (hiro) meaning "big, great" and (ki) meaning "brightness" or (ki) meaning "tree". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
HIROSHI m Japanese
From Japanese (hiroshi) meaning "tolerant, generous", (hiroshi) meaning "prosperous", or other kanji and kanji combinations that are read the same way.
HIROTO m Japanese
From Japanese (hiro) meaning "big, great" or (hiro) meaning "command, esteem" combined with (to) meaning "person", (to) meaning "soar, glide" or (to), which refers to a Chinese constellation. Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
HIRSH m Yiddish
Means "deer" in Yiddish, a vernacular form of Tzvi. The deer is particularly associated with the tribe of Naphtali (see Genesis 49:21).
HIRSHEL m Yiddish
Yiddish diminutive of HIRSH.
HISEIN m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حسين (see HUSAYN).
HISHAM m Arabic
Means "generous" in Arabic, ultimately from hashama "to crush". The meaning derives from the traditional Arab act of crushing bread into crumbs in order to share it. This was the name of an 8th-century caliph of the Umayyad dynasty in Spain.
HIZKIAH m Biblical
Alternate form of the Hebrew name Chizqiyahu (see HEZEKIAH).
HJÁLMAR m Icelandic
Icelandic form of HJALMAR.
HJALMAR m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Hjálmarr meaning "helmeted warrior" from the element hjalmr "helmet" combined with arr "warrior".
HJÖRTUR m Icelandic
Means "deer" in Icelandic.
HLA m & f Burmese
Means "pretty, favourable" in Burmese.
HLUDOWIG m Ancient Germanic
Germanic form of LUDWIG.
HOB m Medieval English
Medieval short form of ROBERT.
HODEI m Basque
Means "cloud" in Basque.
HOEBAER m Limburgish
Limburgish form of HUBERT. Its spelling has been influenced by the French pronunciation of Hubert.
HOHEPA m Maori
Maori form of JOSEPH.
HOKOLESQUA m Native American, Shawnee
Means "cornstalk" in Shawnee. This was the name of an 18th-century Shawnee chief.
HOLDEN m English (Modern)
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "deep valley" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in J. D. Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye (1951), Holden Caufield.
HOLGER m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Hólmgeirr, derived from the elements holmr "island" and geirr "spear". This was the name of one of Charlemagne's generals, a nobleman from Denmark.
HOLLIS m & f English
From an English surname that was derived from Middle English holis "holly trees". It was originally given to a person who lived near a group of those trees.
HOMER m English, Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name ‘Ομηρος (Homeros), derived from ‘ομηρος (homeros) meaning "hostage, pledge". Homer was the Greek epic poet who wrote the Iliad, about the Trojan War, and the Odyssey, about Odysseus's journey home after the war. There is some debate about when he lived, or if he was even a real person, though most scholars place him in the 8th century BC. In the modern era, Homer has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world (chiefly in America) since the 18th century. This name is borne by the cartoon father on the television series The Simpsons.
HOMEROS m Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of HOMER.
HONG m & f Chinese
From Chinese (hóng) meaning "rainbow", (hóng) meaning "enlarge, expand, great" (which is usually only masculine) or 鸿 (hóng) meaning "wild swan, great, vast" (also usually only masculine). Other characters can also form this name.
HONORATUS m Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "esteemed, distinguished". This was the name of at least seven saints, including a 5th-century archbishop of Arles and a 6th-century bishop of Amiens who is the patron saint of bakers.
HONORÉ m French
French form of HONORATUS. It is also sometimes used as a French form of HONORIUS.
HONORINUS m Late Roman
Late Latin name that was a derivative of HONORIUS.
HONORIUS m Late Roman
Late Latin name meaning "honour". This was the name of an emperor of the Western Roman Empire. It was also borne by a few early saints and four popes.
HONZA m Czech
Czech form of HANS.
HOPCYN m Welsh
Welsh form of HOPKIN.
HOPKIN m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of HOB.
HORACE m English, French
English and French form of HORATIUS, and the name by which the Roman poet Quintus Horatius Flaccus is commonly known those languages. In the modern era it has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, in honour of the poet.
HORÁCIO m Portuguese
Portuguese form of HORATIUS.
HORACIO m Spanish
Spanish form of HORATIUS.
HORATIO m English
Variant of HORATIUS. It was borne by the British admiral Horatio Nelson (1758-1805), famous for his defeat of Napoleon's forces in the Battle of Trafalgar, in which he was himself killed. Since his time the name has been occasionally used in his honour.
HORAȚIU m Romanian
Romanian form of HORATIUS.
HORATIUS m Ancient Roman
Roman family name that was possibly derived from Latin hora meaning "hour, time, season", though the name may actually be of Etruscan origin. A famous bearer was Quintus Horatius Flaccus, a Roman lyric poet of the 1st century BC who is better known as Horace in the English-speaking world.
HOREA m Romanian
From Romanian horă, a type of circle dance. This was the nickname of Vasile Ursu Nicola (1731-1785), a leader of a peasant rebellion in Romania. He was eventually captured, tortured and executed.
HORIA m Romanian
Variant of HOREA.
HOROS m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Heru (see HORUS).
HORSA m Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic element hros or hors meaning "horse". According to medieval chronicles, Horsa and his brother Hengist were the leaders of the first Saxon settlers to arrive in Britain. Horsa died in battle with the Britons.
HORST m German
Means "wood, thicket" in German. Alternatively, it may derive from the Germanic element hros or hors meaning "horse".
HORTENSIUS m Ancient Roman
Masculine form of HORTENSIA.
HORUS m Egyptian Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of ‘Ωρος (Horos), the Greek form of Egyptian Hrw (reconstructed as Heru) possibly meaning "falcon" or "high". In Egyptian mythology Horus was the god of light, often depicted as a man with the head of a falcon. The son Osiris and Isis, he avenged his father's murder by killing Seth.
HORYMÍR m Czech (Rare)
Possibly from the Slavic elements gora meaning "mountain" and miru meaning "peace, world".
HOSEA m Biblical
Variant English form of HOSHEA, though the name is spelled the same in the Hebrew text. Hosea is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament, the author of the Book of Hosea. Written in the northern kingdom, it draws parallels between his relationship with his unfaithful wife and the relationship between God and his people.
HOSHEA m Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew name הוֹשֵׁעַ (Hoshe'a) meaning "salvation", from the root יָשַׁע (yasha'). In the Old Testament at Numbers 13:16, Moses gives the spy Hoshea the new name Yehoshu'a (see JOSHUA), which has a related origin. This name was also borne by an 8th-century BC king of Israel, who was the last ruler of that state before it was conquered by Assyria.
HOSNI m & f Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حسني (see HUSNI).
HOSSAM m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حسام (see HUSAM).
HOSSEIN m Persian
Persian form of HUSAYN.
HOUSSAM m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic حسام (see HUSAM).
HOVHANNES m Armenian
Armenian form of Iohannes (see JOHN).
HOVIK m Armenian
Diminutive of HOVHANNES.
HOVO m Armenian
Diminutive of HOVHANNES.
HOVSEP m Armenian
Armenian form of JOSEPH.
HOWARD m English
From an English surname that can derive from several different sources: the Anglo-Norman given name Huard, which was from the Germanic name HUGHARD; the Anglo-Scandinavian given name Haward, from the Old Norse name HÁVARÐR; or the Middle English term ewehirde meaning "ewe herder". This is the surname of a British noble family, members of which have held the title Duke of Norfolk from the 15th century to the present. A famous bearer of the given name was the American industrialist Howard Hughes (1905-1976).
HOWELL m Welsh
Anglicized form of HYWEL.
HOWIE m English
Diminutive of HOWARD.
HOYT m English
From an English surname that was derived from Middle English hoit "stick", originally a nickname for a thin person.
HOZAN m & f Kurdish
Means "poet, intellect" in Kurdish.
HRAFN m Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "raven" in Old Norse.