Masculine Names

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CERDICmAnglo-Saxon
Earlier form of CEDRIC, possibly of Brythonic origin.
CERI (1)mWelsh
Possibly derived from Welsh caru meaning "to love".
CERNUNNOSmCeltic Mythology (Latinized)
Means "horned" in Celtic. This was the name of the Celtic god fertility, animals, wealth, and the underworld. He was usually depicted having antlers, and was identified with the Roman god Mercury.
CÉSAIREmFrench
French form of CAESARIUS.
CÉSARmFrench, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of CAESAR. A famous bearer was the American labour organizer César Chávez (1927-1993).
CESAREmItalian
Italian form of CAESAR.
CESARINOmItalian
Diminutive of CESARE.
CESÁRIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of CAESARIUS.
CESCmCatalan
Short form of FRANCESC.
ÇETİNmTurkish
Means "harsh" in Turkish.
CEVAHİRf & mTurkish
Turkish form of JAWAHIR.
CEVDETmTurkish
Turkish form of JAWDAT.
CÉZARmPortuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese variant of CÉSAR.
CEZARmRomanian, Portuguese (Brazilian)
Romanian form of CAESAR, as well as a Brazilian Portuguese variant of CÉSAR.
CEZÁRIOmPortuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese variant of CESÁRIO.
CEZARYmPolish
Polish form of CAESAR.
CHADmEnglish
From the Old English name Ceadda which is of unknown meaning, possibly based on Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century English saint. Borne primarily by Catholics, it was a rare name until the 1960s when it started to become more common amongst the general population. This is also the name of a country in Africa, though it originates from a different source.
CHADWICKmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from the name of towns in England, meaning "settlement belonging to CHAD" in Old English.
CHAGATAImHistory
Usual English spelling of ÇAĞATAY.
CHAIMmHebrew
Variant transcription of CHAYYIM.
CHALEBmBiblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of CALEB used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
CHANm & fKhmer
Means "moon" in Khmer, ultimately from Sanskrit.
CHANCEmEnglish
Originally a diminutive of CHAUNCEY. It is now usually given in reference to the English word chance meaning "luck, fortune" (ultimately derived from Latin cadens "falling").
CHANDmIndian, Hindi
Modern masculine form of CHANDA.
CHANDAm & fHinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "fierce, hot, passionate" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form चण्ड and the feminine form चण्डा (an epithet of the Hindu goddess Durga).
CHANDANmIndian, Hindi, Bengali, Odia
Derived from Sanskrit चन्दन (chandana) meaning "sandalwood".
CHANDERmIndian, Hindi
Variant transcription of CHANDRA.
CHANDLERmEnglish
From an occupational surname which meant "candle seller" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French.
CHANDRAm & fHinduism, Bengali, Indian, Assamese, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Nepali
Means "moon" in Sanskrit, derived from चन्द (chand) meaning "to shine". This is a transcription of the masculine form चण्ड (a name of the moon in Hindu texts which is often personified as a deity) as well as the feminine form चण्डा.
CHANDRAKANTmIndian, Marathi, Hindi
Means "beloved by the moon", derived from Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra) meaning "moon" and कान्त (kanta) meaning "desired, beloved". This is another name for the moonstone.
CHANGm & fChinese
From Chinese (chāng) meaning "flourish, prosper, good, sunlight" (which is usually only masculine), (chàng) meaning "smooth, free, unrestrained" or (cháng) meaning "long". Other Chinese characters are also possible.
CHANNINGm & fEnglish (Modern)
From an English surname of uncertain origin.
CHAOm & fChinese
From Chinese (chāo) meaning "surpass, leap over" (which is usually only masculine), (cháo) meaning "tide, flow, damp", or other characters which are pronounced similarly.
CHARALAMBOSmGreek
Variant transcription of CHARALAMPOS.
CHARALAMPOSmGreek
Means "to shine from happiness" from Greek χαρα (chara) "happiness" combined with λαμπω (lampo) "to shine".
CHARESmAncient Greek
Derived from Greek χαρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness". This was the name of a 4th-century BC Athenian general. It was also borne by the sculptor who crafted the Colossus of Rhodes.
CHARIOVALDAmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of HAROLD.
CHARITONmAncient Greek
Derived from Greek χαρις (charis) meaning "grace, kindness". This was the name of a 1st-century Greek novelist.
CHARLEMAGNEmHistory
From Old French Charles le Magne meaning "CHARLES the Great". This is the name by which the Frankish king Charles the Great (742-814) is commonly known.
CHARLESmEnglish, French
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".... [more]
CHARLEYm & fEnglish
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES.
CHARLIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES. A famous bearer is Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip 'Peanuts' by Charles Schulz.
CHARLOTmFrench
French diminutive of CHARLES.
CHARLTONmEnglish
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "settlement of free men" in Old English.
CHARONmGreek Mythology
Possibly means "fierce brightness" in Greek. In Greek mythology Charon was the operator of the ferry that brought the newly dead over the River Acheron into Hades.
CHASmEnglish
Diminutive of CHARLES.
CHASEmEnglish
From a surname meaning "chase, hunt" in Middle English, originally a nickname for a huntsman.
CHATZKELmYiddish
Yiddish form of EZEKIEL.
CHÂUf & mVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (châu) meaning "pearl, gem".
CHAUNCEYmEnglish
From a Norman surname of unknown meaning. It was used as a given name in American in honour of Harvard president Charles Chauncey (1592-1672).
CHAVAQQUQmBiblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew form of HABAKKUK.
CHAVDARmBulgarian
Derived from a Persian word meaning "leader, dignitary".
CHAYIMmHebrew
Variant transcription of CHAYYIM.
CHAYYIMmHebrew
Derived from the Hebrew word חַיִּים (chayyim) meaning "life". It has been used since medieval times.
CHAZmEnglish
Diminutive of CHARLES.
CHEmSpanish
From an Argentine expression meaning "hey!". This nickname was acquired by the Argentine revolutionary Ernesto Guevara while he was in Cuba.
CHEAm & fKhmer
Means "healthy" in Khmer.
CHEDOMIRmMacedonian, Medieval Slavic
Variant transcription of ČEDOMIR.
CHEN (1)m & fChinese
From Chinese (chén) or (chén) which both mean "morning". The character also refers to the fifth Earthly Branch (7 AM to 9 AM) which is itself associated with the dragon of the Chinese zodiac. This name can be formed from other characters as well.
CHEN (2)m & fHebrew
Means "grace, charm" in Hebrew.
CHENANIAHmBiblical
Variant of KENANIAH used in several translations of the Old Testament.
CHENGm & fChinese
From Chinese (chéng) meaning "completed, finished, succeeded" or (chéng) meaning "sincere, honest, true", as well as other characters which are pronounced similarly.
CHERNOBOGmSlavic Mythology
Means "the black god" from Slavic cherno "black" and bogu "god". Chernobog was the Slavic god of darkness, evil and grief.
CHEROKEEf & mEnglish (Rare)
Probably derived from the Creek word tciloki meaning "people of a different speech". This is the name of a Native American people who live in the east of North America.
CHESEDf & mHebrew
Means "kindness, goodness" in Hebrew.
CHESLEYmEnglish
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "camp meadow" in Old English.
CHESTERmEnglish
From a surname which originally belonged to a person who came from Chester, an old Roman settlement in Britain. The name of the settlement came from Latin castrum "camp, fortress".
CHESTIBORmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of CZCIBOR.
CHESTIRADmMedieval Slavic (Hypothetical)
Possible medieval Slavic form of CTIRAD.
CHESTISLAVmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of CZESŁAW.
CHETmEnglish
Short form of CHESTER.
CHETANmIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Kannada
Means "visible, conscious, soul" in Sanskrit.
CHEYENNEf & mEnglish
Derived from the Dakota word shahiyena meaning "red speakers". This is the name of a Native American people of the Great Plains. The name was supposedly given to the Cheyenne by the Dakota because their language was unrelated to their own. As a given name, it has been in use since the 1950s.
CHI (2)m & fMythology, Western African, Igbo
Means "god, spirtual being" in Igbo, referring to the personal spiritual guardian that each person is believed to have. Christian Igbo people use it as a name for the personal Christian god. This can also be a short form of the many Igbo names that begin with this element.
CHÍmVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (chí) meaning "will, spirit".
CHIBUEZEm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God is the king" in Igbo.
CHIBUIKEm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God is strength" in Igbo.
CHIBUZOm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God leads the way" in Igbo.
CHICOmPortuguese
Diminutive of FRANCISCO.
CHIDIm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God exists" in Igbo. It is also a short form of Igbo names beginning with Chidi.
CHIDIEBEREm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God is merciful" in Igbo.
CHIDIEBUBEm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God is glorious" in Igbo.
CHIDIEGWUm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God is wonderful" in Igbo.
CHIDIKEmWestern African, Igbo
Means "God is strong" in Igbo.
CHIDUBEMmWestern African, Igbo
Means "guided by God" in Igbo.
CHIEMEKAmWestern African, Igbo
Means "God has performed great deeds" in Igbo.
CHIFUNDOm & fSouthern African, Chewa
Means "mercy" in Chewa.
CHIFUNIROm & fSouthern African, Chewa
Means "will, wish" in Chewa.
CHIJINDUMm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God holds my life" in Igbo.
CHIKEm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God's power" in Igbo.
CHIKEREm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God created" in Igbo.
CHIKONDIm & fSouthern African, Chewa
Means "love" in Chewa.
CHIKUMBUTSOm & fSouthern African, Chewa
Means "memory" in Chewa.
CHIMAmWestern African, Igbo
Means "God knows" in Igbo.
CHIMOmCatalan (Rare)
Valencian diminutive of JOAQUIM.
CHIMWALAm & fEastern African, Yao
Means "stone" in Yao.
CHIMWEMWEm & fSouthern African, Chewa
Means "joy, pleasure" in Chewa.
CHINm & fChinese
Variant of JIN (using Wade-Giles transcription).
CHINASAf & mWestern African, Igbo
Means "God answers" in Igbo.
CHINEDUm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God leads" in Igbo.
CHINGISmMongolian
Mongolian form of GENGHIS.
CHINONSOm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God is nearby" in Igbo.
CHINWEm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God owns" in Igbo. It is also a short form of Igbo names beginning with Chinwe.
CHINWEIKEm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God owns power" in Igbo.
CHINWENDUm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God owns life" in Igbo.
CHINWEUBAm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God owns wealth" in Igbo.
CHIOMAf & mWestern African, Igbo
Means "good God" in Igbo.
CHIPmEnglish
Diminutive of CHARLES or CHRISTOPHER. It can also be from a nickname given in reference to the phrase a chip off the old block, used of a son who is similar to his father.
CHIRANJEEVImIndian, Hindi, Telugu
Variant transcription of CHIRANJIVI.
CHIRANJIVImIndian, Hindi, Telugu
Means "long-lived, infinite" in Sanskrit.
CHISOMOm & fSouthern African, Chewa
Means "grace" in Chewa.
CHIUMBOmEastern African, Mwera
Means "small" in Mwera.
CHIYEMBEKEZOm & fSouthern African, Chewa
Means "hope" in Chewa.
CHIZOBAm & fWestern African, Igbo
Means "God protect us" in Igbo.
CHLODOCHARmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of LOTHAR.
CHLODOVECHmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of LUDWIG.
CHLODULFmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of LUDOLF.
CHRISm & fEnglish, Dutch
Short form of CHRISTOPHER, CHRISTIAN, CHRISTINE, and other names that begin with Chris.
CHRISTmTheology
Modern English form of CHRISTOS.
CHRISTERmSwedish, Danish
Swedish and Danish diminutive of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTIAANmDutch
Dutch form of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTIANmEnglish, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the medieval Latin name Christianus meaning "a Christian" (see CHRISTOS). In England it has been in use since the Middle Ages, during which time it was used by both males and females, but it did not become common until the 17th century. In Denmark the name has been borne by ten kings since the 15th century. A famous bearer was Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), the Danish author of such fairy tales as 'The Ugly Duckling' and 'The Emperor's New Clothes'.
CHRISTIE (2)mScottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish diminutive of CHRISTOPHER.
CHRISTMASm & fEnglish (Rare)
From the name of the holiday, which means "Christ festival".
CHRISTOFFERmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian variant of KRISTOFFER.
CHRISTOFOROSmGreek
Modern Greek transcription of CHRISTOPHER.
CHRISTOPHERmEnglish
From the Late Greek name Χριστοφορος (Christophoros) meaning "bearing CHRIST", derived from Χριστος (Christos) combined with φερω (phero) "to bear, to carry". Early Christians used it as a metaphorical name, expressing that they carried Christ in their hearts. In the Middle Ages, literal interpretations of the name's etymology led to legends about a Saint Christopher who carried the young Jesus across a river. He has come to be regarded as the patron saint of travellers.... [more]
CHRISTOSmTheology, Greek
From Greek Χριστος (Christos) meaning "anointed", derived from χριω (chrio) meaning "to anoint". This was a name applied to Jesus by early Greek-speaking Christians. It is a translation of the Hebrew word מָשִׁיחַ (mashiyach), commonly spelled in English messiah, which also means "anointed".... [more]
CHRISTY (2)mScottish, Irish
Scottish and Irish diminutive of CHRISTOPHER.
CHRYSANTHOSmGreek, Ancient Greek
Means "golden flower" from Greek χρυσεος (chryseos) "golden" combined with ανθος (anthos) "flower". This name was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century Egyptian saint.
CHRYSESmGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek χρυσεος (chryseos) meaning "golden". In Greek mythology Chryses was the father of Chryseis, a woman captured by Agamemnon during the Trojan War.
CHUCHOmSpanish
Spanish diminutive of JESÚS.
CHUCKmEnglish
Diminutive of CHARLES. It originated in America in the early 20th century. Two famous bearers of this name were pilot Chuck Yeager (1923-), the first man to travel faster than the speed of sound, and the musician Chuck Berry (1926-2017), one of the pioneers of rock music.
CHUKSmWestern African, Igbo
Diminutive of Igbo names beginning with the element Chukwu meaning "God".
CHUKWUmMythology
Derived from Igbo chi "god, spirtual being" and ukwu "great". In Igbo mythology Chukwu is the supreme god who created the universe. Christian Igbo people use this name for the Christian god.
CHUKWUDImWestern African, Igbo
Variant of CHIDI, using Chukwu as the first element, which is the extended form of Chi meaning "God".
CHUKWUEMEKAmWestern African, Igbo
Means "God has done something great" in Igbo.
CHUKWUMAmWestern African, Igbo
Variant of CHIMA, using Chukwu as the first element, which is the extended form of Chi meaning "God".
CHUNf & mChinese
From Chinese (chūn) meaning "spring (the season)" or other characters with a similar pronunciation.
CHUSm & fSpanish
Diminutive of JESÚS or JESUSA.
CHUYmSpanish
Diminutive of JESÚS.
CIANmIrish, Irish Mythology
Means "ancient" in Gaelic. This was the name of the mythical ancestor of the Cianachta in Irish legend. Cian was also the name of a son-in-law of Brian Boru.
CIANÁNmIrish
Diminutive of CIAN. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish saint.
CIARmIrish
Derived from Irish ciar meaning "black".
CIARÁNmIrish
Diminutive of CIAR. This was the name of two Irish saints: Saint Ciarán the Elder, the patron of the Kingdom of Munster, and Saint Ciarán of Clonmacnoise, the founder of a monastery in the 6th century.
CIARDHAmIrish
Derived from Irish ciar "black".
CIBRÁNmGalician
Galician form of Cyprianus (see CYPRIAN).
CICEROmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "chickpea" from Latin cicer. Marcus Tullius Cicero (known simply as Cicero) was a statesman, orator and author of the 1st century BC.
CİHANmTurkish
Turkish form of JAHAN.
CİHANGİRmTurkish
Turkish form of JAHANGIR.
CILLIANmIrish
Probably from Gaelic ceall "church" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint who evangelized in Franconia. He was martyred in Würzburg.
CILLÍNmIrish
Variant of CILLIAN.
CINÁEDmScottish, Irish
Means "born of fire" in Gaelic. This was the name of the first king of the Scots and Picts (9th century). It is often Anglicized as Kenneth.
CIONAODHmIrish
Modern Irish form of CINÁED.
CIPRIANmRomanian
Romanian form of Cyprianus (see CYPRIAN).
CIPRIANOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Cyprianus (see CYPRIAN).
CIRÍACOmPortuguese, Spanish
Portuguese form and Spanish variant of CYRIACUS.
CIRIACOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of CYRIACUS.
CIRILmSlovene
Slovene form of CYRIL.
CIRILLOmItalian
Italian form of CYRIL.
CIRINOmItalian, Spanish
Diminutive of CIRO.
CIROmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of CYRUS.
CITLALIf & mNative American, Nahuatl
Means "star" in Nahuatl.
CLAESmSwedish
Swedish short form of NICHOLAS.
CLAIRmFrench, English
French form of Clarus (see CLARA).
CLANCYmIrish, English (Rare)
From the Irish surname Mac Fhlannchaidh which means "son of Flannchadh". The Gaelic name Flannchadh means "red warrior".
CLARENCEmEnglish
From the Latin title Clarensis which belonged to members of the British royal family. The title ultimately derives from the name of the town of Clare in Suffolk. As a given name it has been in use since the 19th century.
CLARKmEnglish
From an English surname meaning "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec which originally meant "priest". A famous bearer of the surname was William Clark (1770-1838), an explorer of the west of North America. It was also borne by the American actor Clark Gable (1901-1960).
CLARUSmLate Roman
Masculine Latin form of CLARA. This was the name of several early saints.
CLAUDmEnglish
Variant of CLAUDE.
CLAUDEm & fFrench, English
French masculine and feminine form of CLAUDIUS. In France the masculine name has been common since the Middle Ages due to the 7th-century Saint Claude of Besançon. It was imported to Britain in the 16th century by the aristocratic Hamilton family, who had French connections. A famous bearer of this name was the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
CLÁUDIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of CLAUDIUS.
CLAUDIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of CLAUDIUS.
CLAUDIUmRomanian
Romanian form of CLAUDIUS.
CLAUDIUSmAncient Roman
From a Roman family name which was possibly derived from Latin claudus meaning "lame, crippled". This was the name of a patrician family prominent in Roman politics. The ancestor of the family was said to have been a 6th-century BC Sabine leader named Attius Clausus, who adopted the name Appius Claudius upon becoming a Roman citizen. The family produced several Roman emperors of the 1st century, including the emperor known simply as Claudius. He was poisoned by his wife Agrippina in order to bring her son Nero (Claudius's stepson) to power. The name was later borne by several early saints, including a 7th-century bishop of Besançon.
CLAUSmGerman, Danish
German short form of NICHOLAS.
CLAYmEnglish
From an English surname that originally referred to a person who lived near or worked with clay. This name can also be a short form of CLAYTON.
CLAYTONmEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from various English place names, all meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
CLEDWYNmWelsh
Derived from the Welsh element caled "rough" combined with gwyn "white, fair, blessed".
CLEISTHENESmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Κλεισθενης (Kleisthenes), derived from κλεος (kleos) "glory" and σθενος (sthenos) "strength". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian statesman and reformer. He helped establish democracy in Athens.
CLEMmEnglish
Short form of CLEMENT.
CLEMENSmGerman, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Original Latin form of CLEMENT, as well as the German, Dutch and Scandinavian form.
CLÉMENTmFrench
French form of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
CLEMENTmEnglish
English form of the Late Latin name Clemens (or sometimes of its derivative Clementius) which meant "merciful, gentle". This was the name of 14 popes, including Saint Clement I, the third pope, one of the Apostolic Fathers. Another saint by this name was Clement of Alexandria, a 3rd-century theologian and church father who attempted to reconcile Christian and Platonic philosophies. It has been in general as a given name in Christian Europe (in various spellings) since early times. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, though it was revived in the 19th century.
CLEMENTEmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
CLEMENTIUSmLate Roman
Derivative of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
CLEOf & mEnglish
Short form of CLEOPATRA, CLEON or CLEOPAS.
CLEONmAncient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Κλεων (Kleon), a Greek name derived from κλεος (kleos) "glory".
CLEOPASmBiblical, Biblical Latin
Shortened form of the Greek name Kleopatros (see CLEOPATRA). In the New Testament Cleopas is a disciple who sees Jesus after his resurrection.
CLEOPHASmBiblical
Form of CLOPAS used in several versions of the New Testament.
CLETUSmEnglish
Short form of ANACLETUS. This name is sometimes used to refer to the third pope, Saint Anacletus. It can also function an an Anglicized form of KLEITOS.
CLEVEmEnglish
Short form of CLEVELAND.
CLEVELANDmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from an Old English place name meaning "hilly land". This was the surname of American president Grover Cleveland (1837-1908). It is also the name of an American city, which was founded by surveyor Moses Cleaveland (1754-1806).
CLIFFmEnglish
Short form of CLIFFORD or CLIFTON.
CLIFFORDmEnglish
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "ford by a cliff" in Old English.
CLIFTONmEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "settlement by a cliff" in Old English.
CLÍMACOmSpanish
Spanish form of Climacus, derived from Greek κλιμαξ (klimax) "ladder". The 7th-century monk Saint John Climacus (also known as John of the Ladder) acquired this name because he wrote a book called 'The Ladder of Divine Ascent'.
CLIMENTmCatalan
Catalan form of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
CLINTmEnglish
Short form of CLINTON. A notable bearer is American actor Clint Eastwood (1930-), who became famous early in his career for his western movies.
CLINTONmEnglish
From a surname which was originally from an Old English place name meaning "settlement on the River Glyme". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Bill Clinton (1946-).
CLIVEmEnglish
From a surname meaning "cliff" in Old English, originally belonging to a person who lived near a cliff.
CLODOVICUSmAncient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Chlodovech (see LUDWIG).
CLOELIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name of unknown meaning.
CLOPASmBiblical
Meaning unknown, probably of Aramaic origin. In the New Testament Clopas is mentioned briefly as the husband of one of the women who witnessed the crucifixion, sometimes identified with Alphaeus.
CLOVISmAncient Germanic (Latinized), French
Shortened form of Clodovicus, a Latinized form of Chlodovech (see LUDWIG). Clovis was a Frankish king who united France under his rule in the 5th century.
CLYDEmEnglish
From the name of the River Clyde in Scotland, which is of unknown origin. It became a common given name in America in the middle of the 19th century, perhaps in honour of Sir Colin Campbell (1792-1863) who was given the title Baron Clyde in 1858.
CNAEUSmAncient Roman
Roman variant of GNAEUS.
CNUTmHistory
Variant of KNUT.
COBUSmDutch
Short form of JACOBUS.
COBYm & fEnglish
Masculine or feminine diminutive of JACOB.
COCHISEmNative American, Apache
From Apache chis meaning "oak, wood". This was the name of a 19th-century chief of the Chiricahua Apache.
CODYmEnglish, Irish
From the Gaelic surname Ó Cuidighthigh, which means "descendant of CUIDIGHTHEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
CÓEMGEINmIrish
Original Irish form of KEVIN.
COENmDutch
Short form of COENRAAD.
COENRAADmDutch
Dutch form of CONRAD.
COHENmEnglish
From a common Jewish surname which was derived from Hebrew כֹּהֵן (kohen) meaning "priest". This surname was traditionally associated with the hereditary priests who claimed descent from the biblical Aaron.
COILEANmIrish
Irish form of CAILEAN.
COINNEACHmScottish
Derived from Gaelic caoin "handsome". It is often Anglicized as Kenneth.
COLmMedieval English
Medieval short form of NICHOLAS.
COLAmAnglo-Saxon
Old English byname meaning "charcoal", originally given to a person with dark features.
COLBERTmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from a Norman form of the Germanic name COLOBERT.
COLBYmEnglish
From a surname, originally from various English place names, derived from the Old Norse nickname Koli (meaning "coal, dark") and býr "town".
COLEmEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from the Old English byname COLA.
COLIN (1)mScottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN.
COLIN (2)mEnglish
Medieval diminutive of Col, a short form of NICHOLAS.
COLMmIrish
Variant of COLUM.
COLMÁNmIrish
Diminutive of Colm (see COLUM). This was the name of a large number of Irish saints.
COLOBERTmAncient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements col, possibly meaning "helmet", and beraht meaning "bright".
COLOMBANOmItalian
Italian form of COLUMBANUS.
COLOMBOmItalian
Italian form of COLUMBA.
COLTONmEnglish (Modern)
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "COLA's town".
COLUMmIrish
Irish form of COLUMBA. This is also an Old Irish word meaning "dove", derived from Latin columba.
COLUMBAm & fLate Roman
Late Latin name meaning "dove". The dove is a symbol of the Holy Spirit in Christianity. This was the name of several early saints both masculine and feminine, most notably the 6th-century Irish monk Saint Columba (or Colum) who established a monastery on the island of Iona off the coast of Scotland. He is credited with the conversion of Scotland to Christianity.
COLUMBANmIrish
Possibly an Irish diminutive of COLUMBA. Alternatively, it may be derived from Old Irish colum "dove" and bán "white". The 7th-century Saint Columban of Leinster was the founder of several monasteries in Europe.
COLUMBANUSmLate Roman
This name can be viewed as a derivative of COLUMBA or a Latinized form of COLUMBAN, both derivations being approximately equivalent. This is the name of Saint Columban in Latin sources.
COLWYNmWelsh
From the name of a river in northern Wales.
CÔMEmFrench
French form of COSMAS.
COMGANmIrish
Anglicized form of COMHGHÁN.
COMHGHALLmIrish
Means "joint pledge" from Irish comh "together" and gall "pledge".
COMHGHÁNmIrish
Means "born together" from Irish comh "together" and gan "born".
CONALLmIrish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Means "strong wolf" in Gaelic. This is the name of several characters in Irish legend including the hero Conall Cernach ("Conall of the victories"), a member of the Red Branch of Ulster, who avenged Cúchulainn's death by killing Lugaid.
CONANmIrish
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from Irish "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) was the author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories.
CONCETTOmItalian
Masculine form of CONCETTA.
CONCHOBHARmIrish, Irish Mythology
Original Irish form of CONOR.
CONFUCIUSmHistory
Anglicized form of the Chinese name Kong Fuzi. The surname (Kong) means "hole, opening" and the title 夫子 (Fuzi) means "master". This was the name of a 6th-century BC Chinese philosopher. His given name was Qiu.
CÔNGmVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (công) meaning "fair, equitable, public".
CONLAOCHmIrish Mythology
Possibly derived from Gaelic conn "chief" and flaith "lord". This was the name of several characters in Irish legend including a son of Cúchulainn who was accidentally killed by his father.
CONLETHmIrish
Modern form of the old Irish name Conláed, possibly meaning "chaste fire" from Gaelic connla "chaste" and aodh "fire". Saint Conláed was a 5th-century bishop of Kildare.
CONLEYmIrish
Anglicized form of CONLETH.
CONNmIrish
Means "chief" in Irish Gaelic.
CONNELLmEnglish (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Conaill meaning "descendant of CONALL".
CONNIEf & mEnglish
Diminutive of CONSTANCE and other names beginning with Con. It is occasionally a masculine name, a diminutive of CORNELIUS or CONRAD.
CONORmIrish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Conchobhar, derived from Old Irish con "hound, dog, wolf" and cobar "desiring". It has been in use in Ireland for centuries and was the name of several Irish kings. It was also borne by the legendary Ulster king Conchobar mac Nessa, known for his tragic desire for Deirdre.
CONRADmEnglish, German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements kuoni "brave" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.
CONRADOmSpanish
Spanish form of CONRAD.
CONRÍmIrish
Means "wolf king" in Irish Gaelic.
CONSTANSmLate Roman
Late Latin name meaning "constant, steadfast". This was the name of a 4th-century Roman emperor, a son of Constantine the Great.
CONSTANTmFrench, English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name CONSTANS. It was also used by the Puritans as a vocabulary name, from the English word constant.
CONSTANTIJNmDutch
Dutch form of Constantinus (see CONSTANTINE).
CONSTANTINmRomanian, French
Romanian and French form of Constantinus (see CONSTANTINE).
CONSTANTINEmHistory
From the Latin name Constantinus, a derivative of CONSTANS. Constantine the Great (272-337) was the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. He moved the capital of the empire from Rome to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (modern Istanbul).
CONSTANTIUSmLate Roman
Late Latin name which was a derivative of CONSTANS.
CONSUSmRoman Mythology
Possibly derived from Latin conserere meaning "to sow, to plant". Consus was a Roman god of the harvest and grain.
CONWAYmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from the name of the River Conwy, which possibly means "holy water" in Welsh.