Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the first letter is R.
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RICHARDmEnglish, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.... [more]
RICHIEmEnglish
Diminutive of RICHARD.
RICKmEnglish
Short form of RICHARD or names ending in rick.
RICKEYmEnglish
Diminutive of RICHARD.
RICKIm & fEnglish
Masculine and feminine diminutive of RICHARD.
RICKIEmEnglish
Diminutive of RICHARD.
RICKYmEnglish
Diminutive of RICHARD.
RICO (1)mSpanish
Short form of RICARDO.
RICO (2)mItalian
Short form of ENRICO.
RIDAmArabic
Variant transcription of RIDHA.
RIDHAmArabic
Means "satisfaction, contentment" in Arabic. This name was borne by Ali Musi al-Ridha, a 9th-century Shia imam.
RIDLEYmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "reed clearing" or "cleared wood" in Old English.
RIDVANmTurkish
Turkish form of RIDWAN.
RIDWANmArabic
Means "satisfaction" in Arabic.
RIEN (1)mDutch
Dutch cognate of REIN.
RIEN (2)mDutch
Dutch short form of MARINUS.
RIFATmTurkish
Turkish form of RIFAT.
RIFATmArabic
Means "high rank" in Arabic.
RIGBYmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "ridge farm" in Old Norse.
RIGELmAstronomy
Derived from Arabic الرجل (al-Rijl) meaning "foot". This is the name of the star that forms the left foot of the constellation Orion.
RIHARDmSlovene
Slovene form of RICHARD.
RIHARDSmLatvian
Latvian form of RICHARD.
RIKmDutch
Short form of HENDRIK, FREDERIK, and other names containing rik.
RIKARDmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of RICHARD.
RIKHARDmFinnish
Finnish form of RICHARD.
RIKU (1)mFinnish
Finnish short form of RICHARD.
RIKU (2)mJapanese
From Japanese (riku) meaning "land" or different kanji which are pronounced the same way.
RIKUTOmJapanese
From Japanese (riku) meaning "land" combined with (to), which refers to a Chinese constellation, or (to) meaning "person", as well as other combinations of kanji which have the same pronunciations.
RILEYm & fEnglish
From a surname which comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.
RINf & mJapanese
From Japanese (rin) meaning "dignified, severe, cold" or other kanji which are pronounced the same way.
RINALDOmItalian
Italian form of REYNOLD. This is the Italian name of the hero Renaud, a character in several Renaissance epics.
RINAT (1)mTatar, Bashkir
Tatar and Bashkir form of RENAT.
RINIm & fDutch
Diminutive of MARINUS, MARINA or CATHARINA.
RINOmItalian
Short form of names ending in rino.
RINUSmDutch
Short form of MARINUS.
RINYm & fDutch
Diminutive of MARINUS, MARINA or CATHARINA.
RIO (1)mVarious
Means "river" in Spanish or Portuguese. A city in Brazil bears this name. Its full name is Rio de Janeiro, which means "river of January", so named because the first explorers came to the harbour in January and mistakenly thought it was a river mouth.
RÍOGHNÁNmIrish
From Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix.
RIORDANmIrish
Anglicized form of RÓRDÁN.
RIPLEYmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which originally came from a place name that meant "strip clearing" in Old English.
RISHImIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Nepali
Means "sage, poet" in Sanskrit, perhaps ultimately deriving from a root meaning "to see".
RIŠKOmSlovak
Diminutive of RICHARD.
RIŠOmSlovak
Diminutive of RICHARD.
RISTEÁRDmIrish
Irish form of RICHARD.
RISTOmFinnish, Macedonian
Finnish and Macedonian short form of CHRISTOPHER.
RIVERm & fEnglish (Modern)
From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".
RIZAmTurkish
Turkish form of RIDHA.
RIZVANmTurkish
Turkish form of RIDWAN.
RIZWANmUrdu, Arabic
Urdu form and variant Arabic transcription of RIDWAN.
ROALDmNorwegian
Modern form of the Old Norse name Hróðvaldr or Hróaldr, composed of the elements hróðr "fame" and valdr "ruler". This name was borne by the children's author Roald Dahl (1916-1990).
ROANmFrisian
Variant of RONNE.
ROARmNorwegian
Newer Scandinavian form of HRÓARR.
ROBmEnglish, Dutch
Short form of ROBERT.
ROBBEmDutch
Diminutive of ROBRECHT.
ROBBIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of ROBERT or ROBERTA.
ROBBYmEnglish
Diminutive of ROBERT.
RÓBERTmHungarian, Slovak, Icelandic
Hungarian and Icelandic form of ROBERT.
ROBERTmEnglish, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.... [more]
ROBERTASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of ROBERT.
ROBERTOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ROBERT. Saint Roberto Bellarmine was a 16th-century cardinal who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. Another famous bearer was Roberto de Nobili, a Jesuit missionary to India in the 17th century.
ROBERTSmLatvian
Latvian form of ROBERT.
ROBImHungarian
Diminutive of RÓBERT.
ROBINm & fEnglish, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
ROBRECHTmDutch
Dutch form of ROBERT.
ROCmCatalan
Catalan form of ROCCO.
ROCCOmItalian, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element hrok meaning "rest". This was the name of a 14th-century French saint who nursed victims of the plague but eventually contracted the disease himself. He is the patron saint of the sick.
ROCHmFrench, Polish
French and Polish form of ROCCO.
ROCHUSmGerman (Rare), Dutch (Rare), Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of ROCCO, used in occasionally German and Dutch.
ROCKYmEnglish
Diminutive of ROCCO or other names beginning with a similar sound, or else a nickname referring to a tough person. This is the name of a boxer played by Sylvester Stallone in the movie 'Rocky' (1976) and its five sequels.
RODmEnglish
Short form of RODERICK or RODNEY.
RODERICKmEnglish, Scottish, Welsh
Means "famous power" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ric "power". This name was in use among the Visigoths; it was borne by their last king (also known as Rodrigo), who died fighting the Muslim invaders of Spain in the 8th century. It also had cognates in Old Norse and West Germanic, and Scandinavian settlers and Normans introduced it to England, though it died out after the Middle Ages. It was revived in the English-speaking world by Sir Walter Scott's poem 'The Vision of Don Roderick' (1811).
RODGEmEnglish
Short form of RODGER.
RODGERmEnglish
Variant of ROGER.
RODIONmRussian
Russian form of HERODION.
RODNEYmEnglish
From a surname, originally derived from a place name, which meant "Hroda's island" in Old English (where Hroda is a Germanic given name meaning "fame"). It was first used as a given name in honour of the British admiral Lord Rodney (1719-1792).
RODOLFITOmSpanish
Spanish diminutive of RODOLFO.
RODOLFOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of RUDOLF. This is the name of the hero in Puccini's opera 'La Bohème' (1896).
RODOLPHEmFrench
French form of RUDOLF.
RODRIGOmSpanish, Portuguese, Italian, Galician
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of RODERICK. A notable bearer was Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar, also known as El Cid, an 11th-century Spanish military commander.
RODRIGUEmFrench
French form of RODERICK.
RODYAmRussian
Diminutive of RODION.
ROELmDutch
Short form of ROELAND or ROELOF.
ROELANDmDutch
Dutch form of ROLAND.
ROELOFmDutch
Dutch form of RUDOLF.
ROFFEmSwedish
Swedish diminutive of ROLF.
ROGELIOmSpanish
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Rogelius, which was possibly derived from the name Rogatus, which was itself derived from Latin rogatus "request".
ROGERmEnglish, French, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear". The Normans brought this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hroðgar (the name of the Danish king in the Anglo-Saxon epic 'Beowulf'). It was a common name in England during the Middle Ages. By the 18th century it was rare, but it was revived in following years. The name was borne by the Norman lords Roger I, who conquered Sicily in the 11th century, and his son Roger II, who ruled Sicily as a king.
ROGÉRIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of ROGER.
ROGIERmDutch
Dutch form of ROGER.
ROHAN (1)mIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Kannada
Derived from Sanskrit रोहण (rohana) meaning "ascending".
ROHITmIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Odia, Gujarati, Kannada, Telugu, Nepali
Derived from Sanskrit रोहित (rohita) meaning "red".
ROI (1)mGalician
Galician short form of RODRIGO.
ROI (2)mHebrew
Means "my shepherd" in Hebrew.
ROIBEÁRDmIrish
Irish form of ROBERT.
ROKmSlovene
Slovene form of ROCCO.
ROKOmCroatian
Croatian form of ROCCO.
ROKUROmJapanese
Variant transcription of ROKUROU.
ROKUROUmJapanese
From Japanese (roku) meaning "six" and (rou) meaning "son". This name was traditionally given to the sixth son. Other combinations of kanji characters can be possible.
ROKUSmDutch
Dutch variant of ROCHUS.
ROLANmRussian
Russian form of ROLAND.
ROLANDmEnglish, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Medieval French
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and land meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
ROLANDOmSpanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of ROLAND.
ROLDÁNmSpanish
Spanish form of ROLAND.
ROLDÃOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of ROLAND.
ROLFmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
From the Germanic name Hrolf (or its Old Norse cognate Hrólfr), a contracted form of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF). The Normans introduced this name to England but it soon became rare. In the modern era it has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world as a German import.
ROLLOmEnglish
Latinized form of Roul, the Old French form of ROLF. Rollo (or Rolf) the Ganger was an exiled Viking who, in the 10th century, became the first Duke of Normandy. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
ROLYmEnglish
Diminutive of ROLAND.
ROMA (1)mRussian
Diminutive of ROMAN.
ROMÀmCatalan
Catalan form of Romanus (see ROMAN).
ROMAEUSmLate Roman
Latin form of ROMEO.
ROMAINmFrench
French form of Romanus (see ROMAN).
ROMÁNmSpanish, Hungarian (Rare)
Spanish and Hungarian form of Romanus (see ROMAN).
ROMANmRussian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German
From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".
ROMANOmItalian
Italian form of Romanus (see ROMAN).
ROMANUSmLate Roman
Latin form of ROMAN.
ROMÃOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of Romanus (see ROMAN).
ROMEOmItalian
Italian form of the Late Latin name Romaeus meaning "a pilgrim to Rome". Romeo is best known as the lover of Juliet in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).
ROMILDAf & mItalian, Ancient Germanic
Means "famous battle" from the Germanic elements hrom "fame" and hild "battle".
ROMOLOmItalian
Italian form of ROMULUS.
ROMULUSmRoman Mythology
Means "of Rome" in Latin. In Roman legend Romulus and Remus were the founders of the city of Rome.
RON (1)mEnglish
Short form of RONALD.
RON (2)m & fHebrew
Means "song, joy" in Hebrew.
RONALDmScottish, English
Scottish form of RAGNVALDR, a name introduced to Scotland by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. It became popular outside Scotland during the 20th century. A famous bearer was American actor and president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).
RONALDOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of RONALD. A notable bearer is the retired Brazilian soccer player Ronaldo Luís Nazário de Lima (1976-), who is commonly known only by his first name.
RÓNÁNmIrish
Means "little seal", derived from Irish rón "seal" combined with a diminutive suffix.
RONENmHebrew
Derived from Hebrew רוֹן (ron) meaning "song, joy".
RONGf & mChinese
From Chinese (róng) meaning "glory, honour, flourish, prosper", (róng) meaning "fuse, harmonize" or (róng) meaning "appearance, form" (which is usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters can form this name as well.
RONI (3)mFinnish
Finnish short form of HIERONYMUS.
RONNEmFrisian
Frisian short form of Germanic names beginning with the element hraban meaning "raven".
RONNIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of RONALD or VERONICA.
RONNYmEnglish
Diminutive of RONALD.
ROOPEmFinnish
Finnish form of ROBERT.
ROOSEVELTmEnglish
From a Dutch surname meaning "rose field". This name is often given in honour of American presidents Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) or Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945).
ROPARZHmBreton
Breton form of ROBERT.
ROQUEmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of ROCCO.
RÓRDÁNmIrish
From the older Irish name Ríoghbhardán, which meant "little poet king" from Irish Gaelic ríogh "king" combined with bard "poet" and a diminutive suffix.
RORIEmIrish, Scottish
Variant of RORY.
RORYmIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of RUAIDHRÍ.
ROSAIREmFrench
Means "rosary" French.
ROSARIOf & mSpanish, Italian
Means "rosary", and is taken from the Spanish title of the Virgin Mary Nuestra Señora del Rosario meaning "Our Lady of the Rosary". This name is feminine in Spanish and masculine in Italian.
ROSCOEmEnglish
From an English surname, originally derived from a place name, which meant "doe wood" in Old Norse.
ROSENDOmSpanish
Spanish form of a Visigothic name composed of the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and sinths "path". This was the name of a 10th-century Galician saint, also known as Rudesind.
ROSHANm & fPersian, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali
Means "light, bright" in Persian.
ROSSmScottish, English
From a Scottish and English surname which originally indicated a person from a place called Ross (such as the region of Ross in northern Scotland), derived from Gaelic ros meaning "promontory, headland". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir James Clark Ross (1800-1862), an Antarctic explorer.
ROSTAMmPersian, Persian Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly from Avestan raodha "to grow" and takhma "strong, brave, valiant". Rostam was a warrior hero in Persian legend. The 11th-century Persian poet Firdausi recorded his tale in the 'Shahnameh'.
ROSTISLAVmRussian, Czech, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements rasti "growth" and slava "glory".
ROSTOMmGeorgian
Georgian form of ROSTAM.
ROSWELLmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from an Old English place name meaning "horse spring".
ROTEMm & fHebrew
From the name of a desert plant (species Retama raetam), possibly derived from Hebrew רְתֹם (retom) meaning "to bind".
ROUBENmBiblical Greek, Armenian
Biblical Greek form of REUBEN, as well as a variant transcription of Armenian RUBEN.
ROULmMedieval French, Medieval English
Norman French form of ROLF.
ROWANm & fIrish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
ROWLANDmEnglish
Medieval variant of ROLAND.
ROWLEYmEnglish
Variant of ROLY.
RÖWŞENmTurkmen
Turkmen form of ROSHAN.
ROYmScottish, English, Dutch
Anglicized form of RUADH. A notable bearer was the Scottish outlaw and folk hero Rob Roy (1671-1734). It is often associated with French roi "king".
ROYALmEnglish
From the English word royal, derived (via Old French) from Latin regalis, a derivative of rex "king". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century.
ROYCEmEnglish
From a surname which was derived from the medieval given name Royse, a variant of ROSE.
ROYDONmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "rye hill", from Old English ryge "rye" and dun "hill".
ROYLEmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "rye hill" from Old English ryge "rye" and hyll "hill".
ROYSTONmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "town of Royse". The given name Royse was a medieval variant of ROSE.
RUm & fChinese
From Chinese () meaning "scholar", () meaning "like, as, if", or other characters with similar pronunciations.
RUADHmIrish, Scottish
Gaelic byname meaning "red", often a nickname for one with red hair. This was the nickname of the Scottish outlaw Raibeart Ruadh MacGregor (1671-1734), known as Rob Roy in English.
RUADHÁNmIrish
Diminutive of RUADH.
RUAIDHRÍmIrish
Means "red king" from Irish ruadh "red" combined with "king". This was the name of the last high king of Ireland, reigning in the 12th century.
RUAIRImScottish
Scottish cognate of RUAIDHRÍ.
RUAIRIDHmScottish
Scottish cognate of RUAIDHRÍ.
RUARAIDHmScottish
Scottish cognate of RUAIDHRÍ.
RUARCmIrish
Probably an Irish form of HRŒREKR, introduced by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. Alternatively it may be derived from Irish ruarc "squall, rainstorm".
RUARIDHmScottish
Scottish cognate of RUAIDHRÍ.
RUBEmEnglish
Short form of REUBEN.
RUBEMmPortuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of REUBEN.
RÚBENmPortuguese
Portuguese form of REUBEN.
RUBÉNmSpanish
Spanish form of REUBEN.
RUBENmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Armenian, Biblical Latin
Scandinavian, Dutch, French and Armenian form of REUBEN. This was the name of an 11th-century Armenian ruler of Cilicia.
RUBENSmPortuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese variant form of REUBEN.
RUDESINDmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of ROSENDO.
RUDImGerman, Hungarian
Diminutive of RUDOLF.
RÜDIGERmGerman
German form of ROGER.
RUDOm & fSouthern African, Shona
Means "love" in Shona.
RUDOLFmGerman, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Russian, Armenian
From the Germanic name Hrodulf, which was derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wulf "wolf". It was borne by three kings of Burgundy, as well as several Habsburg rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria. Anthony Hope used this name for the hero in his popular novel 'The Prisoner of Zenda' (1894).
RUDOLPHmEnglish
English form of RUDOLF, imported from Germany in the 19th century. Robert L. May used it in 1939 for his Christmas character Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.
RUDYmEnglish
Diminutive of RUDOLF.
RUDYARDmEnglish (Rare)
From a place name meaning "red yard" in Old English. This name was borne by Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), the author of 'The Jungle Book' and other works, who was named after Rudyard Lake in Staffordshire.
RUEDImGerman (Swiss)
Swiss diminutive of RUDOLF.
RUFINOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of RUFINUS.
RUFINUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from the cognomen RUFUS. It was borne by several early saints.
RUFUSmAncient Roman, English, Biblical
Roman cognomen which meant "red-haired" in Latin. Several early saints had this name, including one mentioned in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. As a nickname it was used by William II Rufus, a king of England, because of his red hair. It came into general use in the English-speaking world after the Protestant Reformation.
RUGGEROmItalian
Italian form of ROGER.
RUGGIEROmItalian
Italian form of ROGER.
RUHmArabic
Means "spirit" in Arabic.
RUImPortuguese
Variant of RUY.
RUMENmBulgarian, Macedonian
Means "ruddy, red-cheeked" in Bulgarian and Macedonian.
RÚNARmIcelandic
Icelandic form of RUNAR.
RUNARmNorwegian
Derived from the Old Norse elements rún "secret lore" and arr "warrior". This name did not exist in Old Norse, but was created in the modern era.
RUNEmNorwegian, Danish, Swedish
Derived from Old Norse rún meaning "secret lore".
RÚNImAncient Scandinavian, Faroese
Old Norse and Faroese form of RUNE.
RUPERTmGerman, Dutch, English
German variant form of ROBERT. The military commander Prince Rupert of the Rhine, a nephew of Charles I, introduced this name to England in the 17th century.
RUPERTOmSpanish
Spanish form of RUPERT.
RUPINDERm & fIndian (Sikh)
Means "greatest beauty" from Sanskrit रूप (rupa) meaning "beauty, form" combined with the name of the Hindu god INDRA, used here to mean "greatest".
RURIKmRussian
Russian form of the Old Norse name HRŒREKR.
RÜŞENm & fTurkish
Turkish form of ROSHAN.
RUSLANmRussian, Tatar, Bashkir, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Uzbek, Azerbaijani, Ossetian, Chechen, Ingush, Avar
Form of YERUSLAN used by Aleksandr Pushkin in his poem 'Ruslan and Ludmila' (1820), which was loosely based on Russian and Tatar folktales of Yeruslan Lazarevich.
RUSSmEnglish
Short form of RUSSELL.
RUSSELLmEnglish
From a surname which meant "little red one" in French. A notable bearer of the surname was the agnostic British philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), who wrote on many subjects including logic, epistemology and mathematics. He was also a political activist for causes such as pacifism and women's rights.
RÜSTƏMmAzerbaijani
Azerbaijani form of ROSTAM.
RUSTAMmKazakh, Uzbek, Tajik, Azerbaijani
Kazakh, Uzbek, Tajik and Azerbaijani form of ROSTAM.
RÜSTEMmTurkish
Turkish form of ROSTAM.
RUSTYmEnglish
From a nickname which was originally given to someone with a rusty, or reddish-brown, hair colour.
RUSULmArabic
Means "prophets, messengers" in Arabic.
RUTENDOf & mSouthern African, Shona
Means "faith" in Shona.
RUTGERmDutch
Dutch form of ROGER.
RUTH (2)mLimburgish
Limburgish short form of RUTGER.
RUUBENmFinnish
Finnish form of REUBEN.
RUUDmDutch
Dutch short form of RUDOLF.
RUYmPortuguese, Spanish
Medieval Portuguese and Spanish short form of RODRIGO. It is another name of the 11th-century Spanish military commander Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar, also known as El Cid.
RYANmIrish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendant of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).
RYDERmEnglish (Modern)
From an English occupational surname derived from Old English ridere meaning "mounted warrior" or "messenger".
RYKERmEnglish (Modern)
Possibly a variant of the German surname Riker, a derivative of Low German rike "rich". It may have been altered by association with the popular name prefix Ry.
RYLANmEnglish (Modern)
Possibly a variant of the English surname Ryland, which was originally derived from a place name meaning "rye land" in Old English.
RYOmJapanese
Variant transcription of RYOU.
RYOICHImJapanese
Variant transcription of RYOUICHI.
RYOTAmJapanese
Variant transcription of RYOUTA.
RYOUmJapanese
From Japanese (ryou) meaning "cool, refreshing", (ryou) meaning "distant" or (ryou) meaning "reality", as well as other kanji which have the same pronunciation.
RYOUICHImJapanese
From Japanese (ryou) meaning "good" or (ryou) meaning "clear" combined with (ichi) meaning "one". Other kanji combinations are possible.
RYOUTAmJapanese
From Japanese (ryou) meaning "cool, refreshing", (ryou) meaning "clear" or (ryou) meaning "good" combined with (ta) meaning "thick, big". This name can also be formed of other kanji combinations.
RYSZARDmPolish
Polish form of RICHARD.
RYUUmJapanese
From Japanese 竜, 龍 (ryuu) meaning "dragon", as well as other kanji with the same pronunciation.
RYUUNOSUKEmJapanese
From Japanese 竜, 龍 (ryuu) meaning "dragon" or (ryuu) meaning "noble, prosperous" combined with (no), a possessive marker, and (suke) meaning "forerunner, herald". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
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