Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the first letter is S.
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SERVAASmDutch
Dutch form of the Late Latin name Servatius, derived from servatus "saved, redeemed". This was the name of a 4th-century saint who helped spread Christianity to the Low Countries.
SERVAOSmLimburgish
Limburgish form of SERVAAS.
SERVIUSmAncient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, meaning "to preserve" from Latin servo.
SESTOmItalian
Italian form of SEXTUS.
SETH (1)mEnglish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
SETH (2)mEgyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
From Σεθ (Seth), the Greek form of Egyptian Swtkh (reconstructed as Sutekh), which possibly means "pillar" or "dazzle". Seth was the Egyptian god of chaos and the desert, the slayer of Osiris. Osiris's son Horus eventually defeats Seth and has him banished to the desert.
SETImAncient Egyptian
Means "of SETH (2)" in Egyptian. This was the name of two pharaohs of the 19th dynasty.
SETIAWANmIndonesian
Means "loyal friend", from Indonesian setia kawan.
SETTIMIOmItalian
Italian form of SEPTIMIUS.
SETTIMOmItalian
Italian form of SEPTIMUS.
SEUMASmScottish
Scottish form of JAMES.
SEUNGm & fKorean
From Sino-Korean (seung) meaning "rise, ascent", (seung) meaning "victory, excel" or (seung) meaning "inherit", as well as other characters which are pronounced similarly.
SEVANf & mArmenian
From the name of the largest lake in Armenia, which may be from the Urartian word suinia simply meaning "lake".
SEVASTIANmRussian (Rare)
Variant transcription of SEVASTYAN.
SEVEmSpanish
Spanish diminutive of SEVERIANO or SEVERINO.
SEVERImFinnish
Finnish form of SEVERUS.
SEVERIANOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of the Roman cognomen Severianus, which was derived from SEVERUS.
SEVERIANUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from SEVERUS.
SÉVERINmFrench
French form of SEVERINUS.
SEVERINmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian form of SEVERINUS.
SEVERINOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of SEVERINUS.
SEVERINUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name which was derived from SEVERUS. Severinus was the name of many early saints, including a 6th-century Roman philosopher martyred by the Ostrogothic king Theodoric. It was also borne by a pope.
SEVEROmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of SEVERUS.
SEVERUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name meaning "stern" in Latin. This name was borne by several early saints.
SEWARDmEnglish
From a surname which was itself derived from the Old English given name SIGEWEARD.
SEWERYNmPolish
Polish form of SEVERINUS.
SEXTILIUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was a derivative of SEXTUS.
SEXTUSmAncient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, which meant "sixth" in Latin. It was traditionally given to the sixth child.
SEYDOUmWestern African, Manding, Fula, Wolof, Serer
Form of SA'ID used in parts of western Africa.
SEYEDmPersian
Persian form of SAYYID.
SEYFULLAHmTurkish
Turkish form of SAIFULLAH.
SEYMOURmEnglish
From a Norman surname which originally belonged to a person coming from the French town of Saint Maur (which means "Saint MAURUS").
SEYYEDmPersian
Persian form of SAYYID.
SEYYİDmTurkish
Turkish form of SAYYID.
SEYYİTmTurkish
Turkish form of SAYYID.
SHACHARf & mHebrew
Means "dawn" in Hebrew.
SHAD (1)mArabic
Means "happy" in Arabic.
SHAD (2)mEnglish
Perhaps a variant of CHAD.
SHADI (1)mArabic
Means "singer" in Arabic.
SHADRACHmBiblical
Means "command of Aku" in Akkadian, Aku being the name of the Babylonian god of the moon. In the Old Testament Shadrach is the Babylonian name of Hananiah, one of the three men cast into a fiery furnace but saved by God.
SHAFAQATm & fArabic
Means "compassion, pity" in Arabic.
SHAFIQmArabic
Means "compassionate" in Arabic.
SHAHARf & mHebrew
Variant transcription of SHACHAR.
SHAHEENmPersian
Variant transcription of SHAHIN.
SHAHIDmArabic, Urdu
Means "witness" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition الشاهد (al-Shahid) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
SHAHINmPersian
Means "peregrine falcon" in Persian.
SHAHJAHANmUrdu
Means "king of the world" from the Persian elements شاه (shah) "king" and جهان (jahan) "world". This was the name of the 17th-century Mughal emperor who built the Taj Mahal.
SHAHNAZf & mPersian, Arabic, Urdu
Means "pride of the king" from the Persian elements شاه (shah) "king" and ناز (naz) "pride".
SHAHRIARmPersian
Variant transcription of SHAHRIYAR.
SHAHRIVARmPersian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan Kshathra Vairya meaning "desirable power". In Zoroastrianism this was the name of a god of metal and a protector of the weak. This is also the name of the sixth month of the Iranian calendar.
SHAHRIYARmPersian
Means "lord" in Persian.
SHAHROKHmPersian
Means "royal face" in Persian.
SHAHRUKHmUrdu, Indian, Hindi
Urdu and Hindi form of SHAHROKH. A notable bearer is Indian actor Shahrukh Khan (1965-).
SHAHZADmPersian, Arabic, Urdu
Means "prince, son of the king" in Persian.
SHAImHebrew
Either from Hebrew שַׁי (Shai) meaning "gift" or else a Hebrew diminutive of ISAIAH.
SHAKEDf & mHebrew
Means "almond" in Hebrew.
SHAKEELmArabic
Variant transcription of SHAKIL.
SHAKILmArabic
Means "handsome" in Arabic.
SHAKIRmArabic
Means "thankful" in Arabic.
SHAKTIf & mHinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "power" in Sanskrit. In Hinduism a shakti is the female counterpart of a god. The name Shakti is used in particular to refer to the female counterpart of Shiva, also known as Parvati among many other names.
SHAKURmArabic
Means "thankful" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition الشكور (al-Shakur) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
SHALEVm & fHebrew
Means "calm, tranquil" in Hebrew.
SHALOMmHebrew
Means "peace" in Hebrew.
SHAMGARmBiblical
Possibly means "sword" in Hebrew. Shamgar was one of the Old Testament judges.
SHAMILmArabic, Kazakh, Avar, Chechen, Azerbaijani
From Arabic شاميل (shamil) meaning "comprehensive, universal".
SHAMS AL-DINmArabic
From Arabic شَمس (shams) meaning "sun" and دين (din) meaning "religion, faith".
SHAMSUDDINmArabic
Variant transcription of SHAMS AL-DIN.
SHAMUSmIrish
Anglicized form of SÉAMUS.
SHANDARmUrdu
Means "fabulous" in Urdu.
SHÁŃDÍÍNf & mNative American, Navajo
Means "sunshine" in Navajo.
SHANEmIrish, English
Anglicized form of SEÁN. It came into general use in America after the release of the western movie 'Shane' (1953).
SHANI (1)f & mHebrew
Means "red, scarlet" in Hebrew.
SHANI (2)mHinduism
From the Sanskrit name of the planet Saturn. This is the name of a celestial Hindu god.
SHANKARAmHinduism
Derived from the Sanskrit elements शम् (sham) meaning "auspicious, lucky" and कर (kara) meaning "maker". This is another name of the Hindu god Shiva. This was also the name of a 9th-century Indian religious philosopher also known as Shankaracharya.
SHANNONf & mEnglish
From the name of the River Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, called Abha na tSionainn in Irish. It is associated with the goddess Sionann and is sometimes said to be named for her. However it is more likely the goddess was named after the river, which may be related to Old Irish sen "old, ancient". As a given name, it first became common in America after the 1940s.
SHANONf & mEnglish
Variant of SHANNON.
SHANTANUmHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali
Means "wholesome" in Sanskrit. In the Hindu epic the 'Mahabharata' this is the name of a king of Hastinapura.
SHAPURmPersian
Means "son of the king" in Persian. This was the name of three Sassanid emperors.
SHAQUILLEmEnglish (Modern)
Variant of SHAKIL. This name is borne by basketball player Shaquille O'Neal (1972-).
SHARARmBiblical
Means "enemy" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the father of Ahiam.
SHAREEFmArabic
Variant transcription of SHARIF.
SHARIAHmArabic
Means "divine law, noble law" in Arabic, ultimately from an old Arabic word meaning "pathway".
SHARIFmArabic, Urdu, Pashto, Persian, Malay
Means "eminent, virtuous" in Arabic. This was a title used by the descendants of Muhammad.
SHARMAmIndian, Hindi
Means "protection, comfort, joy" in Sanskrit.
SHASHIm & fIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Kannada, Telugu
Traditional name for the moon, it literally means "having a hare" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form शशि and the feminine form शशी.
SHA'ULmBiblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of SAUL.
SHAULmHebrew
Modern Hebrew form of SAUL.
SHAUNmEnglish
Anglicized form of SEÁN.
SHAW (1)mEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from Old English sceaga meaning "thicket".
SHAW (2)mScottish
Anglicized form of SEAGHDH.
SHAWNmEnglish
Anglicized form of SEÁN.
SHAY (1)mIrish
Anglicized form of SÉAGHDHA.
SHAY (2)m & fHebrew
Variant transcription of SHAI.
SHAYNEmEnglish
Variant of SHANE.
SHEAm & fIrish
Anglicized form of SÉAGHDHA, sometimes used as a feminine name.
SHEALTIELmBiblical
Means "I have asked of God" in Hebrew. This was the name of the father of Zerubbabel in the Old Testament.
SHEAMUSmIrish
Anglicized form of SÉAMUS.
SHEARDmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "gap between hills" in Old English.
SHEBAmBiblical
Means "oath" in Hebrew. This is the name of several characters in the Old Testament. Also in the Bible, this is a place name, referring to a region in Ethiopia. The queen of Sheba visited Solomon after hearing of his wisdom.
SHEKHARmIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi, Gujarati
Means "crest, peak" in Sanskrit.
SHELmEnglish
Short form of SHELDON.
SHELAHmBiblical
Means "petition" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of both a grandson of Shem and a son of Judah.
SHELBYm & fEnglish
From a surname, which was possibly a variant of SELBY. Though previously in use as a rare masculine name, it was popularized as a feminine name by the main character in the movie 'The Woman in Red' (1935). It was later reinforced by the movie 'Steel Magnolias' (1989) in which Julia Roberts played a character by this name.
SHELDONmEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "valley with steep sides" in Old English. Sheldon is the name of several locations in England.
SHELLEYf & mEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "clearing on a bank" in Old English. Two famous bearers of the surname were Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), a romantic poet whose works include 'Adonais' and 'Ozymandias', and Mary Shelley (1797-1851), his wife, the author of the horror story 'Frankenstein'. As a feminine given name, it came into general use after the 1940s.
SHELLYf & mEnglish
Variant of SHELLEY.
SHELOMOHmBiblical Hebrew
Biblical Hebrew form of SOLOMON.
SHELTONmEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "shelf town" in Old English.
SHEMmBiblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "name" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Shem is one of Noah's three sons (along with Japheth and Ham) and the ancestor of the Semitic peoples.
SHEMAIAHmBiblical
Means "heard by YAHWEH" in Hebrew. This name is borne by many characters in the Old Testament including a prophet in the reign of Rehoboam.
SHEMERmBiblical
Possibly means "preserved" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the owner of the hill upon which Samaria was built.
SHEMU'ELmBiblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of SAMUEL.
SHERmUrdu, Pashto
Means "lion" in Persian. A famous bearer of this name was Sher Shah, a 16th-century Mughal ruler.
SHERAGAmJewish
Means "light, candle" in Aramaic.
SHERIDANm & fEnglish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Sirideáin meaning "descendant of Sirideán". The name Sirideán means "searcher" in Gaelic.
SHERIFmArabic
Variant transcription of SHARIF.
SHERLOCKmLiterature
Used by Scottish author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle for his character Sherlock Holmes, who was a detective in Doyle's mystery stories beginning in 1887. The character's name was from an English surname meaning "shear lock", originally referring to a person with closely cut hair.
SHERMANmEnglish
From a surname meaning "shear man" in Old English, originally denoting a person who cut cloth. Famous bearers of the surname include American politician Roger Sherman (1721-1793) and American Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman (1820-1891).
SHERWOODmEnglish
From an English place name (or from a surname which was derived from it) meaning "bright forest". This was the name of the forest in which the legendary outlaw Robin Hood made his home.
SHIm & fChinese
From Chinese (shí) meaning "time, era, season", (shí) meaning "real, honest", (shǐ) meaning "history" or (shí) meaning "stone". Other characters can form this name as well.
SHIBmBengali
Bengali form of SHIVA (1).
SHICHIROmJapanese
Variant transcription of SHICHIROU.
SHICHIROUmJapanese
From Japanese (shichi) meaning "seven" and (rou) meaning "son". This was traditionally a name given to the seventh son. Other kanji combinations can be possible.
SHIHABmArabic
Means "shooting star, meteor" in Arabic.
SHIKOBAm & fNative American, Choctaw
Means "feather" in Choctaw.
SHILOHm & fBiblical
From an Old Testament place name possibly meaning "tranquil" in Hebrew. It is also used prophetically in the Old Testament to refer to a person, often understood to be the Messiah (see Genesis 49:10). This may in fact be a mistranslation. This name was brought to public attention after Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie gave it to their daughter in 2006.
SHIMMELmYiddish
Yiddish diminutive of SHIMON.
SHINmJapanese
From Japanese (shin) meaning "real, genuine" or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
SHIN'ICHImJapanese
From Japanese (shin) meaning "real, genuine" or (shin) meaning "fresh, new" combined with (ichi) meaning "one". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
SHINOBUf & mJapanese
From Japanese (shinobu) meaning "endurance", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations having the same pronunciation.
SHIORIf & mJapanese
As a feminine name it can be from Japanese (shi) meaning "poem" combined with (ori) meaning "weave". It can also be from (shiori) meaning "bookmark" (usually feminine) or (shiori) meaning "lithe, bending" (usually masculine), as well as other kanji or kanji combinations.
SHIR (2)mPersian (Rare)
Modern Persian form of SHER.
SHIRLEYf & mEnglish
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "bright clearing" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in Charlotte Brontë's semi-autobiographical novel 'Shirley' (1849). The child actress Shirley Temple (1928-2014) helped to popularize this name.
SHIROmJapanese
Variant transcription of SHIROU.
SHIROUmJapanese
From Japanese (shi) meaning "four" and (rou) meaning "son". This was traditionally a name for the fourth son. Other kanji combinations are possible.
SHIVmIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Punjabi
Northern Indian form of SHIVA (1).
SHIVA (1)mHinduism, Indian, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali
Derived from Sanskrit शिव (shiva) meaning "benign, kind, auspicious". Shiva is the Hindu god of destruction and restoration, the husband of the mother goddess Parvati. His aspect is usually terrifying, but it can also be gentle.
SHLOMOmHebrew
Hebrew form of SOLOMON.
SHMUELmHebrew
Hebrew form of SAMUEL.
SHOmJapanese
Variant transcription of SHOU.
SHOLTOmScottish
Anglicized form of SÌOLTACH.
SHOTAmJapanese
Variant transcription of SHOUTA.
SHOUmJapanese
From Japanese (shou) meaning "soar, glide" or (shou) meaning "prize, reward". Other kanji with identical pronunciations can also form this name.
SHOUHEImJapanese
From Japanese (shou) meaning "soar, glide" and (hei) meaning "level, even, peaceful", in addition to other combinations of kanji which are pronounced the same way.
SHOUTAmJapanese
From Japanese (shou) meaning "soar, glide" and (ta) meaning "thick, big". Other combinations of kanji are also possible.
SHRAGAmJewish
Variant transcription of SHERAGA.
SHRESTHmIndian, Hindi
Means "most excellent, best" in Sanskrit.
SHRINIVASmIndian, Marathi
Means "the abode of Shri" from the name of the Hindu goddess SHRI combined with Sanskrit निवास (nivasa) meaning "abode, house".
SHRIPATImHinduism
Means "husband of Shri" from the name of the Hindu goddess SHRI combined with Sanskrit पति (pati) meaning "husband, lord". This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu.
SHRIVATSAmIndian, Hindi (Rare)
Means "beloved of Shri" from the name of the Hindu goddess SHRI combined with Sanskrit वत्स (vatsa) meaning "beloved, dear". This is the name of a mark on Vishnu's chest.
SHUGmScottish
Scottish diminutive of HUGH.
SHUIm & fChinese
From Chinese (shuǐ) meaning "water", as well as other characters pronounced in a similar way.
SHUKRImArabic
Means "thanking" in Arabic.
SHUN (1)f & mChinese
From Chinese (shùn) meaning "obey, submit" or other characters which are pronounced similarly.
SHUN (2)f & mJapanese
From Japanese 駿 (shun) meaning "fast", (shun) meaning "talented", or other kanji which are pronounced the same way.
SHURAf & mRussian
Russian diminutive of ALEKSANDRA or ALEKSANDR.
SHYAMAm & fHinduism, Indian, Hindi
Derived from Sanskrit श्याम (shyama) meaning "dark, black, blue". This is a transcription of the masculine form श्याम, which is another name of the Hindu god Krishna, as well as the feminine form श्यामा, one of the many names of the wife of the god Shiva. It is also the name of a Jain goddess.
SHYAMALmBengali
From Sanskrit श्यामल (shyamala), a derivative of श्याम (shyama) meaning "dark, black, blue".
SIARHEImBelarusian
Belarusian form of SERGIUS.
SIARLmWelsh
Welsh form of CHARLES.
SIAVASHmPersian, Persian Mythology
Means "possessing black stallions" in Avestan. This is the name of a prince in the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh'.
SIAVUSHmPersian
Variant transcription of SIAVASH.
SIBmBengali
Variant transcription of SHIB.
SIBONAKALISOm & fSouthern African, Zulu
From Zulu isibonakaliso meaning "sign, token, proof".
SIBUSISOmSouthern African, Zulu, Swazi, Ndebele
Means "blessed" in Zulu, Swazi and Ndebele.
SIDmEnglish
Short form of SIDNEY.
SIDDHARTHAmSanskrit, Bengali
Means "one who has accomplished a goal", derived from Sanskrit सिद्ध (siddha) meaning "accomplished" and अर्थ (artha) meaning "goal". Siddhartha Gautama was the real name of Buddha.
SIDNEYm & fEnglish
From the English surname SIDNEY. It was first used as a given name in honour of executed politician Algernon Sidney (1622-1683). Another notable bearer of the surname was the poet and statesman Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586).
SIDONIUSmLate Roman
Latin name which meant "of Sidon". Sidon was an ancient Phoenician city corresponding to modern-day Saida in Lebanon. This name was borne by the 5th-century saint Sidonius Apollinaris, a 5th-century bishop of Clermont.
SIEFFREmWelsh
Welsh form of GEOFFREY.
SIEGBERTmGerman
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and beraht "bright". This was the name of several Frankish kings, including the 7th-century Sigebert III of Austrasia who is regarded as a saint.
SIEGERmDutch, German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and hari "army".
SIEGFRIEDmGerman, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and frid "peace". Siegfried was a hero from Germanic legend, chief character in the 'Nibelungenlied'. He secretly helped the Burgundian king Günther overcome the challenges set out by the Icelandic queen Brünhild so that Günther might win her hand. In exchange, Günther consented to the marriage of Siegfried and his sister Kriemhild. Years later, after a dispute between Brünhild and Kriemhild, Siegfried was murdered by Hagen with Günther's consent. He was stabbed in his one vulnerable spot on the small of his back, which had been covered by a leaf while he bathed in dragon's blood. His adventures were largely based on those of the Norse hero Sigurd. The story was later adapted by Richard Wagner to form part of his opera 'The Ring of the Nibelung' (1876).
SIEGHARDmGerman
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and hard "brave, hardy".
SIEGMUNDmGerman
German variant of SIGMUND.
SIEMmDutch
Dutch short form of SIMON (1).
SIEMENmDutch, Frisian
Dutch and Frisian form of SIMON (1).
SIETmFrisian
Frisian short form of names beginning with the Germanic element sigu meaning "victory".
SIETSEmFrisian
Diminutive of SIET.
SIEUWERDmDutch
Dutch form of SIGURD.
SIFISOmSouthern African, Zulu
Means "wish" in Zulu.
SIGDAGmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and dag "day".
SIGEBERHTmAnglo-Saxon
Means "bright victory", derived from Old English sige "victory" and beorht "bright". This was the name of a king of Wessex. The name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
SIGEWEARDmAnglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements sige "victory" and weard "guard, guardian".
SIGFRID (1)mSwedish
Swedish form of SIEGFRIED.
SIGFRIDOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of SIEGFRIED.
SIGGEmSwedish
Diminutive of SIGMUND, SIGFRID (1), and other Germanic names beginning with the element sigu which means "victory".
SIGIm & fGerman
Diminutive of SIEGFRIED, SIEGLINDE, and other Germanic names beginning with the element sigu which means "victory".
SIGIBERTmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of SIEGBERT.
SIGIFRIDmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of SIEGFRIED.
SIGIHARDmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of SIEGHARD.
SIGIHERImAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of SIEGER.
SIGIMUNDmAncient Germanic
Old Germanic form of SIGMUND.
SIGISMONDOmItalian
Italian form of SIGISMUND.
SIGISMUNDmGerman (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Form of SIGMUND in which the first element is sigis, an older form of sigu. Saint Sigismund was a 6th-century king of the Burgundians. This was also the name of kings of Poland and a ruler of the Holy Roman Empire.
SIGIVALDmAncient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and wald "rule".
SIGIWARDmAncient Germanic
Germanic cognate of SIGURD.
SIGMUNDmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and mund "protector" (or in the case of the Scandinavian cognate, from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and mundr "protector"). In Norse mythology this was the name of the hero Sigurd's father, the bearer of the powerful sword Gram. A notable bearer was the Austrian psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the creator of the revolutionary theory of psychoanalysis.
SIGURDmNorwegian, Danish, Swedish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Sigurðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and varðr "guardian". Sigurd was the hero of the Norse legend the 'Volsungasaga', which tells how his foster-father Regin sent him to recover a hoard of gold guarded by the dragon Fafnir. After slaying the dragon Sigurd tasted some of its blood, enabling him to understand the language of birds, who told him that Regin was planning to betray him. In a later adventure, Sigurd disguised himself as Gunnar (his wife Gudrun's brother) and rescued the maiden Brynhildr from a ring of fire, with the result that Gunnar and Brynhildr were married. When the truth eventually came out, Brynhildr took revenge upon Sigurd. The stories of the German hero Siegfried were in part based on him.
SIGURÐURmIcelandic
Icelandic form of SIGURD.
SIGVARDmSwedish
Swedish form of SIGURD.
SIKANDARmUrdu, Pashto
Urdu and Pashto form of ALEXANDER.
SIKKEmFrisian
Frisian diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element sigu which means "victory".
SILASmEnglish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name SAUL (via Aramaic).... [more]
SILOUANOSmBiblical Greek
Form of SILVANUS used in the Greek New Testament.
SILVANOmItalian
Italian form of SILVANUS.
SILVANUSmRoman Mythology, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman name derived from Latin silva "wood, forest". Silvanus was the Roman god of forests. This name appears in the New Testament belonging to one of Saint Paul's companions, also called Silas.
SILVERmEnglish
From the English word for the precious metal or the colour, ultimately derived from Old English seolfor.
SILVESTERmDutch, English, Slovene, Slovak, German, Late Roman
From a Roman name meaning "of the forest" from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the name of three popes, including Saint Silvester I who supposedly baptized the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine the Great. As an English name, Silvester (or Sylvester) has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became less common after the Protestant Reformation.
SILVESTRmCzech
Czech form of SILVESTER.
SILVESTREmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of SILVESTER.
SILVESTROmItalian
Italian form of SILVESTER.
SILVIJOmCroatian
Croatian form of SILVIUS.
SILVIOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of SILVIUS.
SILVIUmRomanian
Romanian form of SILVIUS.
SILVIUSmLate Roman, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the family name of several of the legendary kings of Alba Longa. It was also the name of an early saint martyred in Alexandria.
SIMÃOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of SIMON (1).
SIMASmLithuanian
Short form of SIMONAS.
SIMBA (1)mSouthern African, Shona
Means "strength" in Shona.
SIMBA (2)mEastern African, Swahili
Means "lion" in Swahili. This is the name of the main character in the Disney movie 'The Lion King' (1994), about a lion cub who exiles himself after his father is murdered.
SIMCHAf & mHebrew
Means "happiness, joy" in Hebrew.
ŠIMEmCroatian
Croatian short form of SIMON (1).
SIMEmMacedonian
Macedonian short form of SIMON (1).
SIMENmNorwegian
Norwegian variant of SIMON (1).
SIMEONmBiblical, Bulgarian, Serbian
From Συμεων (Symeon), the Old Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Shim'on (see SIMON (1)). In the Old Testament this is the name of the second son of Jacob and Leah and the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. In the New Testament the Greek rendering Σιμων (Simon) is more common, though Συμεων occurs belonging to a man who blessed the newborn Jesus. He is recognized as a saint in most Christian traditions.... [more]
SIMIONmRomanian
Romanian form of SIMEON.
SIMIYUmEastern African, Luhya
Means "born during the dry season" in Luhya.
ŠIMOmCroatian
Croatian short form of SIMON (1).
SIMOmFinnish, Serbian
Finnish and Serbian form of SIMON (1).
ŠIMONmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of SIMON (1).
SIMÓNmSpanish
Spanish form of SIMON (1). This name was borne by the South American revolutionary Simón Bolívar (1783-1830).
SIMON (1)mEnglish, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁםְעוֹן (Shim'on) which meant "he has heard". This name is spelled Simeon, based on Greek Συμεων, in many translations of the Old Testament, where it is borne by the second son of Jacob. The New Testament spelling may show influence from the otherwise unrelated Greek name SIMON (2).... [more]
SIMON (2)mAncient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek σιμος (simos) meaning "flat-nosed". In Greek mythology this was the name of one of the Telchines, demigods who were the original inhabitants of Rhodes.
SIMONASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of SIMON (1).
SIMONE (2)mItalian
Italian form of SIMON (1).
SIMONImGeorgian
Georgian variant of SIMON (1).
SIMONIDESmAncient Greek
Derived from Greek σιμος (simos) "flat-nosed" and the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This name was borne by the 7th-century BC iambic poet Simonides of Amorgos and the 6th-century BC lyric poet Simonides of Ceos.
ŠIMUNmCroatian
Croatian form of SIMON (1).
SINCLAIRm & fEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a Norman French town called "Saint CLAIR". A notable bearer was the American author Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951).
SINDREmNorwegian
Norwegian form of SINDRI.
SINDRImNorse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Possibly means either "small, trivial" or else "sparkling" in Old Norse. In Norse legend this was the name of a dwarf who, with his brother Brokk, made many magical items for the gods.
SINGHmIndian (Sikh)
From Sanskrit सिंह (sinha) meaning "lion". In 1699 Guru Gobind Singh gave all his male Sikh followers the surname Singh, and it is now a very common surname or a middle name. The female equivalent is Kaur.
SINIŠAmCroatian, Serbian
Derived from Serbo-Croatian sin meaning "son".
SINJINmEnglish (Rare)
Variant of the name St. John (see JOHN).
SÌOLTACHmScottish
Means "sower" in Scottish Gaelic.
SIÔNmWelsh
Welsh form of JOHN, via Old French Jehan.
SIÔRmWelsh
Welsh form of GEORGE.
SIORSmWelsh
Welsh form of GEORGE.
SIORUSmWelsh
Welsh form of GEORGE.
SIOTHRÚNmIrish
Irish form of GEOFFREY.
SIPHOmSouthern African, Zulu, Xhosa, Ndebele
Means "gift" from Zulu, Xhosa and Ndebele isipho.
SIRIUSmAstronomy
The name of a bright star in the constellation Canis Major, derived via Latin from Greek σειριος (seirios) "burning".
SISAYmEastern African, Amharic
Means "good omen" in Amharic.
SISTOmItalian
Italian form of SIXTUS.
SISUmFinnish
Means "willpower, determination, strength" in Finnish.
SÍTHEACHmIrish (Rare)
Means "peaceful" or "mysterious, fairy-like" in Irish Gaelic.
SITHEMBILEf & mSouthern African, Zulu
Means "we trust" in Zulu.
SI-UmKorean
From Sino-Korean (si) meaning "begin, start" combined with (u) meaning "divine intervention, protection" or (u) meaning "rain". Other combinations of hanja characters can form this name as well.
SIVAmTamil, Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam
Variant transcription of SHIVA (1).
ŞIVANmKurdish
Means "shepherd" in Kurdish.
SI-WOOmKorean
Variant transcription of SI-U.
SIXTEmFrench (Rare)
French form of SIXTUS.
SIXTENmSwedish
From the Old Norse name Sigsteinn, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and steinn "stone".
SIXTUSmLate Roman
Latin form of the Greek name Ξυστος (Xystos) meaning "scraped, polished". This name was borne by five popes. The first pope by this name was the sixth to serve after Saint Peter, so there is a possibility that this name is in fact derived from Latin sextus "sixth".
SIYABONGAmSouthern African, Zulu, Ndebele
Means "we thank you" in Zulu and Ndebele.
SIZWEmSouthern African, Xhosa
Means "nation" in Xhosa.
SJAAKmDutch
Dutch form of JACQUES or ISAAC.
SJAKIEmDutch
Diminutive of SJAAK.
SJANGmLimburgish
Limburgish form of Iohannes, via the French form JEAN (1).
SJARELmLimburgish
Limburgish form of CHARLES.
SJEFmDutch
Dutch short form of JOZEF.
SJOERDmFrisian, Dutch
Frisian form of SIGURD.
SJORSmDutch
Dutch form of GEORGE.
SJRAmLimburgish
Limburgish form of GERARD. Its spelling has been influenced by the French pronunciation of Gérard.
SJURDmNorwegian
Norwegian form of SIGURD.
SKANDAmHinduism
Means "hopping, spurting, spilling" in Sanskrit. In Hindu belief this is the name of the god of war, also known as Kartikeya or Murugan. He is worshipped especially by the Tamils in southern India.
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