Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the origin is Classical Latin.
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SILASmEnglish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name SAUL (via Aramaic).... [more]
SILOUANOSmBiblical Greek
Form of SILVANUS used in the Greek New Testament.
SILVANOmItalian
Italian form of SILVANUS.
SILVANUSmRoman Mythology, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman name derived from Latin silva "wood, forest". Silvanus was the Roman god of forests. This name appears in the New Testament belonging to one of Saint Paul's companions, also called Silas.
SILVESTERmDutch, English, Slovene, Slovak, German, Late Roman
From a Roman name meaning "of the forest" from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the name of three popes, including Saint Silvester I who supposedly baptized the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine the Great. As an English name, Silvester (or Sylvester) has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became less common after the Protestant Reformation.
SILVESTRmCzech
Czech form of SILVESTER.
SILVESTREmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of SILVESTER.
SILVESTROmItalian
Italian form of SILVESTER.
SILVIJOmCroatian
Croatian form of SILVIUS.
SILVIOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese, Croatian
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of SILVIUS.
SILVIUmRomanian
Romanian form of SILVIUS.
SILVIUSmLate Roman, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the family name of several of the legendary kings of Alba Longa. It was also the name of an early saint martyred in Alexandria.
SINCLAIRm & fEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a Norman French town called "Saint CLAIR". A notable bearer was the American author Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951).
SKYLERm & fEnglish (Modern)
Variant of SCHUYLER. The spelling was modified due to association with the name Tyler and the English word sky.
SLYmEnglish
Short form of SYLVESTER. The actor Sylvester Stallone (1946-) is a well-known bearer of this nickname.
SÖRENmSwedish, German
Swedish and German form of SØREN.
SØRENmDanish, Norwegian
Danish form of SEVERINUS. Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a Danish philosopher who is regarded as a precursor of existentialism.
SPARTACUSmHistory
Means "from the city of Sparta" in Latin. Spartacus was the name of a Thracian-born Roman slave who led a slave revolt in Italy in the 1st century BC. He was eventually killed in battle and many of his followers were crucified.
SPURIUSmAncient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, which is of uncertain meaning, probably of Etruscan origin. It may be related to the Late Latin word spurius "of illegitimate birth", which was derived from Etruscan srural "public".
STIJNmDutch
Short form of CONSTANTIJN or AUGUSTIJN.
SUMMANUSmRoman Mythology
Means "before the morning", derived from Latin sub "under, before" and mane "morning". Summanus was the Roman god of the night sky and night lightning, a nocturnal counterpart to Jupiter.
SYARHEYmBelarusian
Variant transcription of SIARHEI.
SYDmEnglish
Short form of SYDNEY.
SYDNEYf & mEnglish
From a surname which was a variant of the surname SIDNEY. This is the name of the largest city in Australia, which was named for Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney in 1788. Since the 1990s this name has been mainly feminine.
SYLVAINmFrench
French form of SILVANUS.
SYLVESTERmEnglish, Dutch, Danish, German
Medieval variant of SILVESTER. This is currently the usual English spelling of the name. The actor Sylvester Stallone (1946-) is a famous bearer.
SYLVESTREmFrench
French form of SILVESTER.
SYLWESTERmPolish
Polish form of SILVESTER.
SZILVESZTERmHungarian
Hungarian form of SILVESTER.
TACITOmItalian (Rare), Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare)
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of TACITUS.
TACITUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "silent, mute" in Latin. This was the name of a 1st-century Roman historian.
TARQUINmHistory
From the Roman name Tarquinius which is of unknown meaning, possibly Etruscan in origin. This was the name of two early kings of Rome.
TATIANUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from TATIUS.
TATIUSmRoman Mythology, Ancient Roman
Roman family name of unknown meaning, possibly of Sabine origin. According to Roman legend, Titus Tatius was an 8th-century BC king of the Sabines who came to jointly rule over the Romans and Sabines with the Roman king Romulus.
TEGIDmWelsh
Possibly derived from Welsh teg "fair", or possibly from the Roman name TACITUS. This is the Welsh name of a lake in Wales, called Bala Lake in English. It also occurs in medieval Welsh legends as the husband of Ceridwen.
TÉRCIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of TERTIUS.
TERENCEmEnglish
From the Roman family name Terentius which is of unknown meaning. Famous bearers include Publius Terentius Afer, a Roman playwright, and Marcus Terentius Varro, a Roman scholar. It was also borne by several early saints. The name was used in Ireland as an Anglicized form of TOIRDHEALBHACH, but it was not in use as an English name until the late 19th century.
TERENTImGeorgian, Russian
Georgian form of Terentius (see TERENCE). It is also a Russian variant transcription of TERENTIY.
TERENTIUSmAncient Roman
Original Latin form of TERENCE.
TERENTIYmRussian
Russian form of Terentius (see TERENCE).
TERENZIOmItalian
Italian form of Terentius (see TERENCE).
TERMINUSmRoman Mythology
Means "limit, boundary, end" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman god of boundaries.
TERRELLmEnglish
From an English surname which was probably derived from the Norman French nickname tirel "to pull", referring to a stubborn person. It may sometimes be given in honour of civil rights activist Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954).
TERRY (2)m & fEnglish
Diminutive of TERENCE or THERESA. A famous bearer was Terry Fox (1958-1981), a young man with an artificial leg who attempted to run across Canada to raise money for cancer research. He died of the disease before crossing the country.
TERTIUSmAncient Roman
This was both a Roman praenomen and a cognomen which meant "third" in Latin.
TERZOmItalian
Italian form of TERTIUS.
TEUNmDutch
Dutch short form of ANTONIUS.
TEUNISmDutch
Dutch short form of ANTONIUS.
THEUNmDutch
Dutch short form of ANTONIUS.
THEUNISmDutch
Dutch short form of ANTONIUS.
THRACIUSmAncient Roman
From a Roman name which meant "of Thracia". Thracia was a region in southeast Europe, now divided between Greece and Turkey.
TIAGOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of JAMES, derived from SANTIAGO.
TIBERIUmRomanian
Romanian form of TIBERIUS.
TIBERIUSmAncient Roman
Roman praenomen, or given name, meaning "of the Tiber" in Latin. The Tiber is the river that runs through Rome. Tiberius was the second Roman emperor, the stepson of Emperor Augustus.
TIBORmHungarian, Czech, Slovak
Hungarian, Czech and Slovak form of Tiburtius (see TIBURCIO).
TIBORCmHungarian (Rare)
Hungarian form of Tiburtius (see TIBURCIO).
TIBURCIOmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of the Roman cognomen Tiburtius which meant "of Tibur". Tibur (now called Tivoli) was a resort town near Rome. Saint Tiburtius was a 3rd-century martyr from Rome.
TIITUSmFinnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of TITUS.
TIJNmDutch
Short form of MARTIJN or AUGUSTIJN.
TINmCroatian
Croatian short form of MARTIN, AUGUSTIN, and other names ending in tin.
TINE (2)mSlovene
Slovene diminutive of MARTIN or VALENTIN.
TINEKmSlovene
Slovene diminutive of MARTIN or VALENTIN.
TINOmItalian
Short form of VALENTINO, MARTINO, and other names ending in tino.
TITmRussian
Russian form of TITUS.
TITASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of TITUS.
TITIANUSmAncient Roman
Original Latin form of TIZIANO.
TITOmItalian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of TITUS.
TITOSmBiblical Greek
Form of TITUS used in the Greek New Testament.
TITUmOld Church Slavic
Old Slavic form of TITUS.
TITUSmAncient Roman, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman praenomen, or given name, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to Latin titulus "title of honour". It is more likely of Oscan origin, since it was borne by the legendary Sabine king Titus Tatius.... [more]
TIZIANOmItalian
Italian form of the Roman cognomen Titianus, which was derived from the Roman praenomen TITUS. A famous bearer was the Venetian Renaissance painter Tiziano Vecellio (1488-1576), known in English as Titian.
TONmDutch
Dutch short form of ANTON.
TONĆImCroatian
Croatian diminutive of ANTHONY.
TONČImCroatian
Croatian diminutive of ANTHONY.
TONE (1)mSlovene
Short form of ANTON.
TÓNImHungarian
Hungarian diminutive of ANTHONY.
TONI (1)mFinnish, Croatian, Bulgarian, Spanish, Portuguese, German
Short form of ANTTONI, ANTUN, and other related names.
TONINHOmPortuguese
Portuguese diminutive of ANTÓNIO or ANTÔNIO.
TONINOmItalian
Diminutive of ANTONIO.
TONIOmItalian
Short form of ANTONIO.
TÕNISmEstonian
Estonian form of ANTHONY.
TOÑOmSpanish
Spanish diminutive of ANTONIO.
TONYmEnglish
Short form of ANTHONY.
TOONmDutch
Dutch diminutive of ANTOON.
TORE (2)mItalian
Short form of SALVATORE.
TORY (1)mAfrican American
Meaning unknown, possibly a diminutive of SALVATORE.
TRACEmEnglish
Short form of TRACY.
TRACEYf & mEnglish
Variant of TRACY.
TRACYf & mEnglish
From an English surname which was taken from a Norman French place name meaning "domain belonging to THRACIUS". Charles Dickens used it for a male character in his novel 'The Pickwick Papers' (1837). It was later popularized as a feminine name by the main character Tracy Lord in the movie 'The Philadelphia Story' (1940). This name is also sometimes used as a diminutive of THERESA.
TRAIANmRomanian
Romanian form of Traianus (see TRAJAN).
TRAIANUSmAncient Roman
Original Latin form of TRAJAN.
TRAJANmHistory, Macedonian
From the Roman cognomen Traianus, which is of unknown meaning. The Roman emperor Trajan (full name Marcus Ulpius Traianus) is considered among the most capable men to have led the empire. His military accomplishments include victories over Dacia and Parthia.
TRAVERSmEnglish (Rare)
From the surname TRAVERS.
TRAVISmEnglish
From the English surname Travis (a variant of TRAVERS). It was used in America in honour of William Travis (1809-1836), the commander of the Texan forces at the Battle of the Alamo.
TÚLIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of TULLIO.
TULIOmSpanish
Spanish form of TULLIO.
TULLIOmItalian
Italian form of the Roman family name Tullius, which is of unknown meaning. A famous bearer was Marcus Tullius Cicero, a Roman orator and author.
TULLYmHistory
Form of Tullius (see TULLIO) used to refer to the Roman orator Marcus Tullius Cicero.
TURNUSmRoman Mythology
Meaning unknown. According to Virgil's 'Aeneid', Turnus was a king of the Rutuli. He led the Latins in war against the Trojans led by Aeneas. At the end of the book he is killed by Aeneas in a duel.
TXOMINmBasque
Basque form of DOMINIC.
TYRELLmEnglish (Modern)
From a surname which was a variant of TERRELL.
TYRRELLmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of TERRELL.
TYTUSmPolish
Polish form of TITUS.
UALANmScottish
Scottish form of VALENTINE (1).
UINSEANNmIrish
Irish form of VINCENT.
URBAINmFrench
French form of Urbanus (see URBAN).
URBANmDanish, Swedish, German, Polish, Slovene, Biblical
From the Latin name Urbanus which meant "city dweller". This name is mentioned briefly in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. It was subsequently borne by eight popes.
URBANOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Urbanus (see URBAN).
URSmGerman
German form of the Latin name Ursus, which meant "bear". Saint Ursus was a 3rd-century soldier in the Theban Legion who was martyred with Saint Victor. He is the patron saint of Solothurn in Switzerland.
URSINUSmLate Roman
Latin name which was a derivative of Ursus (see URS).
URSUSmLate Roman
Latin form of URS.
VALm & fEnglish
Short form of VALENTINE (1), VALERIE, and other names beginning with Val.
VALENSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen (see VALENTINE (1)). This name was borne by a 4th-century Roman emperor.
VALENTmCroatian
Croatian short form of VALENTIN.
VALENTEmPortuguese, Italian
Portuguese and Italian form of VALENTIN.
VALENTIJNmDutch
Dutch form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).
VALENTÍNmSpanish, Slovak
Spanish and Slovak form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).
VALENTINE (1)mEnglish
From the Roman cognomen Valentinus which was itself from the name Valens meaning "strong, vigourous, healthy" in Latin. Saint Valentine was a 3rd-century martyr. His feast day was the same as the Roman fertility festival of Lupercalia, which resulted in the association between Valentine's day and love. As an English name, it has been used occasionally since the 12th century.
VALENTINIANUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was a derivative of the cognomen Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)). This name was borne by three Roman emperors.
VALENTINOmItalian
Italian form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).
VALENTYNmUkrainian
Ukrainian form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).
VALÈREmFrench
French form of VALERIUS.
VALERImBulgarian, Georgian, Russian
Bulgarian and Georgian form of VALERIUS, as well as a variant transcription of the Russian name VALERIY.
VALÉRIANmFrench
French form of Valerianus (see VALERIAN).
VALERIANmRussian, Ukrainian, Georgian, Romanian, History
From the Roman cognomen Valerianus, which was itself derived from the Roman name VALERIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century Roman emperor. Several saints also had this name, including a 2nd-century martyr of Lyons.
VALERIANUSmAncient Roman
Original Latin form of VALERIAN.
VALĒRIJSmLatvian
Latvian form of VALERIUS.
VALÉRIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of VALERIUS.
VALERIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of VALERIUS.
VALERIUmRomanian
Romanian form of VALERIUS.
VALERIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name which was derived from Latin valere "to be strong". This was the name of several early saints.
VALERIYmRussian
Russian form of VALERIUS.
VALEROmSpanish
Spanish variant of VALERIUS.
VALERYmRussian
Variant transcription of VALERIY.
VALImRomanian
Romanian diminutive of VALERIU or VALENTIN.
VARINIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name possibly derived from VARIUS.
VARIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name which meant "versatile" in Latin. Varius Rufus was a Roman epic poet of the 1st century BC.
VAVŘINECmCzech
Czech form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
VAVRINECmSlovak
Slovak form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
VEITmGerman
German form of VITUS or WIDO.
VERGILmEnglish
Variant of VIRGIL.
VERGINIUSmAncient Roman
Masculine form of VIRGINIA.
VERÍSSIMOmPortuguese
From the Latin name Verissimus which meant "very true". Saint Verissimus was a Portuguese martyr executed during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian in the early 4th century.
VESPASIANmHistory
From the Roman cognomen Vespasianus, derived either from Latin vesper meaning "west" or "evening" or vespa meaning "wasp". This was the name of a 1st-century Roman emperor, Titus Flavius Vespasianus, the founder of the Flavian dynasty.
VESPASIANOmItalian
Italian form of Vespasianus (see VESPASIAN).
VESPASIANUSmAncient Roman
Ancient Roman form of VESPASIAN.
VESPASIENmFrench (Rare)
French form of Vespasianus (see VESPASIAN).
VESTERmDanish
Short form of SYLVESTER.
VIATORmLate Roman
Late Latin name (see BEATRIX). This was the name of a 4th-century Italian saint.
VIBIANUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was a derivative of VIBIUS.
VIBIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name of unknown meaning, probably of Etruscan origin.
VICm & fEnglish
Short form of VICTOR or VICTORIA.
VICENÇmCatalan
Catalan form of VINCENT.
VICENTmCatalan
Valencian form of VINCENT.
VICENTEmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of VINCENT.
VÍCTORmSpanish, Catalan
Spanish and Catalan form of VICTOR.
VICTORmEnglish, French, Portuguese, Romanian, Dutch, Swedish, Late Roman
Roman name meaning "victor, conqueror" in Latin. It was common among early Christians, and was borne by several early saints and three popes. It was rare as an English name during the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the French writer Victor Hugo (1802-1885), who authored 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
VICTORINOmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of VICTORINUS.
VICTORINUSmLate Roman
Roman name which was derived from VICTOR. This was the name of a ruler of the Gallic Empire in the 3rd century. It was also borne by the 4th-century Roman grammarian and philosopher Victorinus Afer as well as a few early saints.
VICTORIUSmLate Roman
Roman name which was derived from VICTOR. This was the name of two early saints.
VIDmSlovene, Croatian, Hungarian (Rare)
Slovene, Croatian and Hungarian form of WIDO or VITUS. Saint Vitus, known in Slavic languages as Sveti Vid (or similar), has been conflated with the Slavic god Svetovid.
VIDA (1)mHungarian
Hungarian form of WIDO or VITUS.
VIDALmSpanish
Spanish form of Vitalis (see VITALE).
VIKENTImRussian
Variant transcription of VIKENTIY.
VIKENTIJEmSerbian
Serbian form of VINCENT.
VIKENTIYmRussian
Russian form of VINCENT.
VIKTORASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of VICTOR.
VIKTORSmLatvian
Latvian form of VICTOR.
VINmEnglish
Short form of VINCENT.
VINCEmEnglish, Hungarian
English short form and Hungarian normal form of VINCENT.
VINCENCmCzech, Slovene
Czech and Slovene form of VINCENT.
VINCENTmEnglish, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
VINCENTASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of VINCENT.
VINCENTEmItalian
Italian variant form of VINCENT.
VINCENTIUSmLate Roman
Original Latin form of VINCENT.
VINCENZOmItalian
Italian form of VINCENT.
VINICIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of the Roman family name Vinicius, which was possibly derived from Latin vinum "wine".
VINÍCIUSmPortuguese
Portuguese form of Vinicius (see VINICIO).
VINKOmCroatian, Slovene
Croatian and Slovene form of VINCENT.
VINNIEmEnglish
Diminutive of VINCENT.
VINNYmEnglish
Diminutive of VINCENT.
VINZENZmGerman
German form of VINCENT.
VIORELmRomanian
Derived from viorea, the Romanian word for the alpine squill flower (species Scilla bifolia) or the sweet violet flower (species Viola odorata). It is derived from Latin viola "violet".
VIRGILmEnglish, Romanian
From the Roman family name Vergilius which is of unknown meaning. This name was borne by the 1st-century BC Roman poet Publius Vergilius Maro, commonly called Virgil, who was the writer of the 'Aeneid'. Due to him, Virgil has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
VIRGILIJUSmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of VIRGIL.
VIRGÍLIOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of VIRGIL.
VIRGILIOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of VIRGIL.
VIRGILIUmRomanian
Romanian variant of VIRGIL.
VIRGILIUSmLate Roman
Medieval Latin form of VERGILIUS, altered by association with Latin virgo "maiden" or virga "wand".
VISSENTEmSardinian
Sardinian form of VINCENT.
VÍTmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of VITUS or WIDO.
VITALEmItalian
Italian form of the Late Latin name Vitalis, which was derived from Latin vitalis "of life, vital". Vitalis was the name of several early saints and martyrs.
VITALImRussian, Ukrainian
Variant transcription of VITALIY.
VITALIJUSmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of Vitalis (see VITALE).
VITALISmLate Roman
Latin form of VITALE.
VITALIYmRussian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of Vitalis (see VITALE).
VITALYmRussian, Ukrainian
Variant transcription of VITALIY.
VITOmItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of VITUS.
VÍTORmPortuguese, Galician
Portuguese and Galician form of VICTOR.
VITTOREmItalian
Italian form of VICTOR.
VITTORINOmItalian
Italian form of VICTORINUS.
VITTORIOmItalian
Italian form of VICTORIUS.
VITUSmAncient Roman
Roman name which was derived from Latin vita "life". Saint Vitus was a child martyred in Sicily in the early 4th century. From an early date this name was confused with the Germanic name Wido.
VITYAmRussian
Diminutive of VIKTOR.
VIVIANm & fEnglish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Latin name Vivianus which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of BÉBINN or a variant of VIVIEN (2).
VIVIANUSmLate Roman
Latin form of VIVIAN.
VIVIEN (1)mFrench
French form of Vivianus (see VIVIAN).
VLAHOmCroatian
Croatian form of Blasius (see BLAISE).
VLASmRussian
Russian form of BLAISE.
VLASImRussian (Rare)
Variant transcription of VLASIY.
VLASISmGreek
Greek form of BLAISE.
VLASIYmRussian (Rare)
Russian form of BLAISE.
VLASSISmGreek
Greek form of BLAISE.
VULCANmRoman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Vulcanus, possibly related to fulgere "to flash", but more likely of pre-Latin origin. In Roman mythology Vulcan was the god of fire. He was later equated with the Greek god Hephaestus.
WALENTYmPolish
Polish form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)).
WALERIANmPolish
Polish form of Valerianus (see VALERIAN).
WALERYmPolish
Polish form of VALERIUS.
WARRICKmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of WARWICK.
WARWICKmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the name of a town in England, itself from Old English wer "weir, dam" and wíc "settlement".
WAWRZYNIECmPolish
Polish form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
WIKTORmPolish
Polish form of VICTOR.
WINCENTYmPolish
Polish form of VINCENT.
WITmPolish
Polish form of VITUS or WIDO.
XANTImBasque
Basque form of SANTIAGO.
XIÁNmGalician
From Xulián, the Galician form of JULIAN.
XULIOmGalician
Galician form of JULIUS.
YEMELYANmRussian
Russian form of Aemilianus (see EMILIANO).
YULImRussian
Variant transcription of YULIY.
YULIANmRussian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of JULIAN.
YULIYmRussian
Russian form of JULIUS.
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