Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the origin is Old English.
There are 303 names matching your criteria.

ADAIR   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the given name EDGAR.
ÆLFGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ALGAR.
ÆLFHEAH   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and heah "high"... [more]
ÆLFNOÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ælf "elf" combined with noð "boldness, daring".
ÆLFRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ALFRED.
ÆLFRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and ric "power, rule".
ÆLFSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and sige "victory".
ÆLFSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and stan "stone".
ÆLFWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and weard "guardian".
ÆLFWIG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wig "war, battle".
ÆLFWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wine "friend"... [more]
ÆLRED   m   Anglo-Saxon
Contracted form of ÆÐELRÆD. This was the name of a 12th-century English saint.
ÆSC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "ash tree" in Old English. This was the nickname of a 5th-century king of Kent, whose birth name was Oeric.
ÆÐELBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Adalbert (see ALBERT). This was the name of a Saxon king of England and two kings of Kent, one of whom was a saint... [more]
ÆÐELFRIÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and friþ "peace"... [more]
ÆÐELMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and mær "famous"... [more]
ÆTHELNOÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and noð "boldness, daring".
ÆÐELRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and ræd "counsel"... [more]
ÆÞELRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELRÆD.
ÆTHELRED   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELRÆD.
ÆÐELRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and ric "power, rule"... [more]
ÆÐELSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and stan "stone"... [more]
ÆTHELSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELSTAN.
ÆTHELWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element æðel "noble" combined with weard "guardian".
ÆÐELWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and wine "friend"... [more]
ÆTHELWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELWINE.
AINSLEY   f & m   Scottish, English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ALDEN   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name EALDWINE.
ALDOUS   m   English (Rare)
Probably a diminutive of names beginning with the Old English element eald "old". It has been in use as an English given name since the Middle Ages, mainly in East Anglia... [more]
ALDUS   m & f   Medieval English
Medieval variant of ALDOUS.
ALF (2)   m   English
Short form of ALFRED.
ALFIE   m   English
Diminutive of ALFRED.
ALFRÉD   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of ALFRED.
ALFRED   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel"... [more]
ALFREDAS   m   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of ALFRED.
ALFREDO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ALFRED.
ALGAR   m   English (Rare)
Means "elf spear" from Old English ælf "elf" and gar "spear"... [more]
ALGER   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name ALGAR.
ALPHEGE   m   History
Middle English form of ÆLFHEAH.
ALVIN   m   English
From a medieval form of any of the Old English names ÆLFWINE, ÆÐELWINE or EALDWINE... [more]
AROLDO   m   Italian
Italian form of HAROLD.
ASH   m & f   English
Short form of ASHLEY. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.
ASHLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah... [more]
ASTON   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from either a place name meaning "east town" in Old English or from the given name ÆÐELSTAN.
ATHELSTAN   m   History
Modern form of ÆÐELSTAN.
AUDLEY   m   English
From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning "EALDGYÐ's clearing" in Old English.
AVERILL   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
AVERY   m & f   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
AYLMER   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of ELMER.
BADA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name probably derived from beadu meaning "battle".
BENTLEY   m   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing"... [more]
BENTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name, composed of Old English beonet "bent grass" and tun "enclosure".
BEORHTRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorht "bright" and ric "power, rule".
BEORHTSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorht "bright" and sige "victory".
BEORNRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorn "warrior, man" and ræd "counsel".
BEOWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Possibly means "bee wolf" (in effect equal to "bear") from Old English beo "bee" and wulf "wolf"... [more]
BEVERLY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's novel 'Beverly of Graustark' (1904).
BLAKE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
BRAD   m   English
Short form of BRADLEY, BRADFORD, and other names beginning with Brad. A famous bearer is American actor Brad Pitt (1963-).
BRADLEY   m   English
From a surname which originally came from a place name meaning "broad clearing" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the World War II American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
BROOK   m & f   English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived near a brook.
BROOKS   m   English
From an English surname, a variant of BROOK.
BURT   m   English
Short form of BURTON.
BURTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "fortified town". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), an explorer of Africa and Asia.
CEADDA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of CHAD.
CENHELM   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of KENELM.
CENRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cene "bold" and ric "power".
CEOLMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ceol "keel" and mund "protection".
CHAD   m   English
From the Old English name Ceadda which is of unknown meaning, possibly based on Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century English saint... [more]
CHADWICK   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "dairy farm belonging to CHAD" in Old English.
COLA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English byname meaning "charcoal", originally given to a person with dark features.
COLE   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the Old English byname COLA.
COLTEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of COLTON.
COLTON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "COLA's town".
CUTHBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of CUTHBERT.
CUTHBERT   m   English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements cuþ "famous" and beorht "bright"... [more]
CYNEBALD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and beald "bold".
CYNEFRIÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "royal peace" from Old English cyne "royal" and friþ "peace".
CYNEHEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and heard "brave, hardy".
CYNEMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and mær "famous".
CYNERIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and ric "power".
CYNESIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and sige "victory".
CYNEWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and weard "guard".
DADO (1)   m   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO.
DARWIN   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name Deorwine which meant "dear friend". The surname was borne by the English naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882), the man who first proposed the theory of natural selection and subsequently revolutionized biology.
DEORWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements deor "dear" and wine "friend".
DU   m   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO.
DUARTE   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of EDWARD. This name was borne by a 15th-century king of Portugal, who was named after his maternal ancestor Edward III of England.
DUDA   m & f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO or EDUARDA.
DUDDA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English byname possibly meaning "round".
DUDLEY   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "Dudda's clearing" in Old English. The surname was borne by a British noble family.
DUDU   m   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO.
DUNSTAN   m   English (Rare), Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements dun "dark" and stan "stone". This name was borne by a 10th-century saint, the archbishop of Canterbury... [more]
EADBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and beorht "bright"... [more]
EADBHÁRD   m   Irish
Irish form of EDWARD.
EADGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDGAR.
EADMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDMUND.
EADRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDRIC.
EADWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDWARD.
EADWIG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wig "war"... [more]
EADWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDWIN.
EADWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wulf "wolf"... [more]
EALDRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and ræd "counsel"... [more]
EALDWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EALHHERE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ealh "temple" and here "army".
EALHSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ealh "temple" combined with stan "stone".
ÉAMON   m   Irish
Variant of ÉAMONN. This name was borne by American-born Irish president Éamon de Valera (1882-1975), whose birth name was Edward.
EAMON   m   Irish
Variant of ÉAMONN.
ÉAMONN   m   Irish
Irish form of EDMUND.
EARDWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element eard "land" combined with wulf "wolf".
EASTMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ESMOND.
ECGBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EGBERT.
ED   m   English, Dutch
Short form of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDDY   m   English
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDE   m   Hungarian
Diminutive of EDVÁRD or EDUÁRD.
EDGAR   m   English, French
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gar "spear"... [more]
EDGARAS   m   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of EDGAR.
EDGARD   m   French
French form of EDGAR.
EDGARDO   m   Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of EDGAR.
EDI   m   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene diminutive of EDVARD and a Croatian diminutive of EDUARD.
EDISON   m   English
From an English surname which meant either "son of EDA (2)" or "son of ADAM"... [more]
EDMAO   m   Limburgish
Limburgish form of EDMUND. Its spelling has been influenced by the French pronunciation of Edmond.
EDMÉ   m   French (Archaic)
Short form of EDMOND.
EDMOND   m   French
French form of EDMUND. A notable bearer was the English astronomer Edmond Halley (1656-1742), for whom Halley's comet is named.
EDMONDO   m   Italian
Italian form of EDMUND.
EDMUND   m   English, German, Polish
From the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and mund "protection"... [more]
EDMUNDO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of EDMUND.
EDOARDO   m   Italian
Italian form of EDWARD.
EDORTA   m   Basque
Basque form of EDWARD.
ÉDOUARD   m   French
French form of EDWARD.
EDRIC   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and ric "rule"... [more]
EDU   m   Portuguese
Portuguese short form of EDUARDO.
EDUÁRD   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of EDWARD.
EDUARDO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of EDWARD.
EDUARDS   m   Latvian
Latvian form of EDWARD.
EDVÁRD   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of EDWARD.
EDVIN   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian
Scandinavian, Finnish, Estonian and Hungarian form of EDWIN.
EDWARD   m   English, Polish
Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and weard "guard"... [more]
EDWIN   m   English, Dutch
Means "rich friend" from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wine "friend"... [more]
EDWYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of EDWIN.
EETU   m   Finnish
Finnish form of EDWARD.
EGBERT   m   English, Dutch
Means "bright edge" from the Old English elements ecg "edge of a sword" and beorht "bright"... [more]
EIDEARD   m   Scottish
Scottish form of EDWARD.
EKEWAKA   m   Hawaiian
Hawaiian form of EDWARD.
ELDRED   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from EALDRÆD.
ELMER   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English name ÆÐELMÆR. In the United States it is sometimes given in honour of brothers Jonathan (1745-1817) and Ebenezer Elmer (1752-1843), who were active in early American politics.
ELRIC   m   Medieval English
Middle English form of either of the Old English names ÆLFRIC or ÆÐELRIC... [more]
ELVIN   m   English
Variant of ALVIN.
ELVIS   m   English
Meaning unknown. It could possibly be a derivative of ALVIS or ELWIN. More likely, it is from the rare surname Elvis, which is ultimately derived from the given name ELOISE... [more]
ELWIN   m   English
Variant of ALVIN.
ELWYN   m   English
Variant of ALVIN.
EOFORWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and wine "friend"... [more]
ESMOND   m   English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements east "grace" and mund "protection"... [more]
ESMUND   m   English (Rare)
Variant of ESMOND.
ETHELBERT   m   English
Middle English form of ÆÐELBERHT. The name was very rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived briefly in the 19th century.
ETHELRED   m   English (Archaic)
Middle English form of ÆÐELRÆD. The name was very rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived briefly in the 19th century.
EWART   m   English
From an English and Scottish surname which was either based on a Norman form of EDWARD, or else derived from a place name of unknown meaning.
FRED   m   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese
Short form of FREDERICK or other names containing the same element. A famous bearer was the American actor and dancer Fred Astaire (1899-1987).
FREDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of FREDERICK or FREDA.
FREDO   m   Italian (Rare)
Short form of FEDERICO, ALFREDO or GOFFREDO.
GLADWIN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name GLÆDWINE.
GLADWYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GLADWIN.
GLÆDWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements glæd "bright" and wine "friend"... [more]
GODRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "power of god", derived from Old English god combined with ric "power, rule"... [more]
GODWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "friend of god", derived from Old English god combined with wine "friend"... [more]
GOODWIN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the given name GODWINE.
HAL   m   English
Medieval diminutive of HARRY.
HARLEY   m & f   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HAROLD   m   English
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler"... [more]
HAROLDO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of HAROLD.
HARRI   m   Finnish, Welsh
Finnish and Welsh form of HARRY.
HARRIS   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name HARRY.
HARRISON   m   English
From an English surname which meant "son of HARRY". This was the surname of two American presidents, William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) and his grandson Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901)... [more]
HARRY   m   English
Medieval English form of HENRY. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and HAROLD... [more]
HEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Short form of various Old English names containing the element heard meaning "brave, hardy".
HEREWARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements here "army" and weard "guard"... [more]
HEREWEALD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of HAROLD.
HILDRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Older form of HILDRED.
HILDRED   f & m   English
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel"... [more]
HROÐGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Hrodger (see ROGER). The name became unused after the Normans introduced Hrodger after their invasion... [more]
HROÐULF   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF). This name appears in 'Beowulf' belonging to the nephew of Hroðgar.
HUNTER   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
IRVIN   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of either IRVING or IRWIN.
IRWIN   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name EOFORWINE.
KENDRICK   m   English
From a surname which has several different origins. It could be from the Old English given names Cyneric "royal power" or Cenric "bold power", or from the Welsh name Cynwrig "chief hero"... [more]
KENELM   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English name Cenhelm, which was composed of the elements cene "bold, keen" and helm "helmet"... [more]
KENNARD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given names CYNEWEARD or CYNEHEARD.
KENRICK   m   English (Rare)
Variant of KENDRICK.
KIM (1)   f & m   English
At the present it is usually considered a short form of KIMBERLY, but it in fact predates it as a given name. The author Rudyard Kipling used it for the title hero of his novel 'Kim' (1901), though in this case it was short for KIMBALL... [more]
KIMBALL   m   English
From a surname which was derived from either the Welsh given name CYNBEL or the Old English given name CYNEBALD.
KOLE   m   English (Modern)
Variant of COLE.
KYNASTON   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "CYNEFRIÐ's town" in Old English.
LALO   m   Spanish
Diminutive of EDUARDO.
LEE   m & f   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War... [more]
LEIGH   f & m   English
From a surname which was a variant of LEE.
LEOFDÆG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with dæg "day".
LEOFRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with ric "power".
LEOFSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and sige "victory".
LEOFSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with stan "stone".
LEOFWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "dear friend", derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and wine "friend"... [more]
LEWIN   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the given name LEOFWINE.
MAO (2)   m   Limburgish
Short form of EDMAO or REMAO.
MILTON   m   English
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "mill town" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was John Milton (1608-1674), the poet who wrote 'Paradise Lost'.
MONET   f & m   Various
From a French surname which was derived from either HAMON or EDMOND. This was the surname of the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
NED   m   English
Diminutive of EDWARD or EDMUND. It has been used since the 14th century, and may have had root in the medieval affectionate phrase mine Ed, which was later reinterpreted as my Ned.
ÖDI   m   Hungarian
Diminutive of ÖDÖN.
ÖDÖN   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of EDMUND.
OSBEORN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSBORN.
OSBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSBERT.
OSBERT   m   English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorht "bright"... [more]
OSBORN   m   English
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorn "bear". During the Anglo-Saxon period there was also a Norse cognate Ásbjörn used in England, and after the Norman conquest the Norman cognate Osbern was introduced... [more]
OSBORNE   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of OSBORN.
OSBOURNE   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of OSBORN.
ÓSCAR   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of OSCAR.
ÒSCAR   m   Catalan
Catalan form of OSCAR.
OSCAR   m   English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers... [more]
OSGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and gar "spear".
ÓSKAR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of OSCAR.
OSKAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish
Scandinavian, German, Polish and Slovene form of OSCAR. A famous bearer was Oskar Schindler (1908-1974), who saved over a thousand Polish Jews during World War II.
OSKARI   m   Finnish
Finnish form of OSCAR.
OSKARS   m   Latvian
Latvian form of OSCAR.
OSKU   m   Finnish
Short form of OSKARI.
OSMOND   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and mund "protection". During the Anglo-Saxon period a Norse cognate Ásmundr was also used in England, and another version was imported by the Normans... [more]
OSMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSMOND.
OSVALDO   m   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of OSWALD.
OSWALD   m   English, German, Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler"... [more]
OSWIN   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and wine "friend". Saint Oswin was a 7th-century king of Northumbria... [more]
OSWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSWIN.
OSZKÁR   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of OSCAR.
OZ (1)   m   English
Short form of OSWALD, OSBORN, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
OŽBALT   m   Slovene
Slovene form of OSWALD.
OŽBEJ   m   Slovene
Slovene variant form of OSWALD.
OZZIE   m   English
Diminutive of OSWALD, OSBORN, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
OZZY   m   English
Variant of OZZIE.
PÆGA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name of unknown meaning.
PARRY   m   Welsh
From a Welsh surname which was derived from ap Harry meaning "son of HARRY".
PAYTON   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of PEYTON.
PEYTON   m & f   English
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "PÆGA's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress... [more]
PRESLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest clearing" (Old English preost and leah). This surname was borne by musician Elvis Presley (1935-1977).
PUCK   m & f   Anglo-Saxon Mythology, Dutch
Meaning unknown, from Old English puca. It could ultimately be of either Germanic or Celtic origin. In English legend this was the name of a mischievous spirit, also known as Robin Goodfellow... [more]
ROYSTON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "town of Royse". The given name Royse was a medieval variant of ROSE.
SÆWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements "sea" and wine "friend".
SEWARD   m   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Old English given name SIGEWEARD.
SHAD (2)   m   English
Perhaps a variant of CHAD.
SIGEBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "bright victory", derived from Old English sige "victory" and beorht "bright"... [more]
SIGEWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements sige "victory" and weard "guard, guardian".
SMITH   m   English
From an English surname meaning "metal worker, blacksmith", derived from Old English smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world.
SWIÐHUN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of SWITHIN.
SWITHIN   m   History
From the Old English name Swiðhun or Swiþhun, derived from swiþ "strong" and perhaps hun "bear cub"... [more]
SWITHUN   m   History
Variant of SWITHIN.
TED   m   English
Short form of EDWARD or THEODORE. A famous bearer was the American baseball player Ted Williams (1918-2002), who was born as Theodore.
TEDDY   m   English
Diminutive of EDWARD or THEODORE.
ÞUNOR   m   Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Anglo-Saxon cognate of Þórr (see THOR).
ULRIC   m   English (Rare)
Middle English form of the Old English name Wulfric meaning "wolf power". When it is used in modern times, it is usually as a variant of ULRICH.
WAYNE   m   English
From an occupational surname meaning "wagon maker", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". Use of it as a given name can be partly attributed to the popularity of the actor John Wayne (1907-1979)... [more]
WEMBA   m   Anglo-Saxon (Rare)
Byname derived from Old English wamb meaning "belly".
WIGBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon, Ancient Germanic
Old English form of WYBERT. This is also a continental Germanic cognate.
WIGHEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYOT.
WIGMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYMOND.
WIGSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYSTAN.
WIL   m & f   English, Dutch
Short form of WILLIAM and other names beginning with Wil.
WILF   m   English
Short form of WILFRED.
WILFRED   m   English
Means "desiring peace" from Old English wil "will, desire" and friþ "peace"... [more]
WILFRID   m   English
Variant of WILFRED.
WILFRIÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WILFRED.
WILHEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of WILLIHARD.
WILKIE   m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a diminutive of the given name WILLIAM.
WILKIN   m   Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of WILLIAM.
WILKY   m   Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of WILLIAM.
WILL   m   English
Short form of WILLIAM or other names beginning with Will. A famous bearer is American actor Will Smith (1968-), whose full name is Willard.
WILLARD   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name WILLIHARD (or the Old English cognate Wilheard).
WILLIS   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Will, a diminutive of WILLIAM.
WILMǢR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of WILLAMAR.
WILMER   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the given name WILMǢR.
WILSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of WILLIAM". The surname was borne by Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), the American president during World War I.
WINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English wine "friend".
WINFRED   m   English
Means "friend of peace" from the Old English elements wine "friend" and friþ "peace"... [more]
WINFRIÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WINFRED.
WINSLOW   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from an Old English place name meaning "hill belonging to WINE". A famous bearer of this name was American painter Winslow Homer (1836-1910).
WINTHROP   m   English
From a surname which was originally taken from a place name meaning "WINE's village" in Old English.
WINTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "enclosure belonging to WINE" in Old English.
WOLF   m   German, Jewish, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Short form of WOLFGANG, WOLFRAM or other names containing the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf"... [more]
WOLFE   m   English (Rare)
Variant of WOLF.
WULFNOÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and noð "boldness, daring"... [more]
WULFRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ULRIC.
WULFSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and sige "victory".
WULFSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and stan "stone".
WYATT   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name WYOT. Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) was an American lawman and gunfighter involved in the famous shootout at the OK Corral.
WYBERT   m   Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigberht, composed of the elements wig "battle" and beorht "bright".
WYMOND   m   Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigmund, composed of the elements wig "battle" and mund "protector".


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