Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the origin is Old English.
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ADAIR   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the given name EDGAR.
ÆLFGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ALGAR.
ÆLFHEAH   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and heah "high". This was the name of an 11th-century archbishop of Canterbury, a saint and martyr, who is commonly known as Alphege or Elphege.
ÆLFNOÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ælf "elf" combined with noð "boldness, daring".
ÆLFRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ALFRED.
ÆLFRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and ric "power, rule".
ÆLFSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and sige "victory".
ÆLFSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and stan "stone".
ÆLFWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and weard "guardian".
ÆLFWIG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wig "war, battle".
ÆLFWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wine "friend". This name was not commonly used after the Norman conquest.
ÆLRED   m   Anglo-Saxon
Contracted form of ÆÐELRÆD. This was the name of a 12th-century English saint.
ÆSC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "ash tree" in Old English. This was the nickname of a 5th-century king of Kent, whose birth name was Oeric.
ÆÐELBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Adalbert (see ALBERT). This was the name of a Saxon king of England and two kings of Kent, one of whom was a saint. It became unused after the Normans introduced their form of Adalbert after their invasion.
ÆÐELFRIÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and friþ "peace". The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ÆÐELMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and mær "famous". It is a cognate of ADELMAR.
ÆTHELNOÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and noð "boldness, daring".
ÆÐELRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and ræd "counsel". This was the name of two Saxon kings of England including Æðelræd II "the Unready" whose realm was overrun by the Danes in the early 11th century. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ÆÞELRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELRÆD.
ÆTHELRED   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELRÆD.
ÆÐELRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and ric "power, rule". This was the name of several early Anglo-Saxon kings.
ÆÐELSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and stan "stone". This was the name of an early king of England. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ÆTHELSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELSTAN.
ÆTHELWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element æðel "noble" combined with weard "guardian".
ÆÐELWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and wine "friend". This name became rare after the Norman conquest. Saint Æðelwine was a 7th-century bishop of Lindsey, England.
ÆTHELWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELWINE.
AINSLEY   f & m   Scottish, English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ALDEN   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name EALDWINE.
ALDOUS   m   English (Rare)
Probably a diminutive of names beginning with the Old English element eald "old". It has been in use as an English given name since the Middle Ages, mainly in East Anglia. The British author Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) was a famous bearer of this name.
ALDUS   m & f   Medieval English
Medieval variant of ALDOUS.
ALF (2)   m   English
Short form of ALFRED.
ALFIE   m   English
Diminutive of ALFRED.
ALFRÉD   m   Hungarian, Slovak
Hungarian and Slovak form of ALFRED.
ALFRED   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
ALFREDAS   m   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of ALFRED.
ALFREDO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ALFRED.
ALGAR   m   English (Rare)
Means "elf spear" from Old English ælf "elf" and gar "spear". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman conquest, being absorbed by similar-sounding names and Norman and Scandinavian cognates. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
ALGER   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name ALGAR.
ALPHEGE   m   History
Middle English form of ÆLFHEAH.
ALVIN   m   English
From a medieval form of any of the Old English names ÆLFWINE, ÆÐELWINE or EALDWINE. It was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname which was derived from the Old English names.
AROLDO   m   Italian
Italian form of HAROLD.
ASH   m & f   English
Short form of ASHLEY. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.
ASHLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.
ASTON   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from either a place name meaning "east town" in Old English or from the given name ÆÐELSTAN.
ATHELSTAN   m   History
Modern form of ÆÐELSTAN.
AUDLEY   m   English
From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning "EALDGYÐ's clearing" in Old English.
AVERILL   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
AVERY   m & f   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
AYLMER   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of ELMER.
BADA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name probably derived from beadu meaning "battle".
BENTLEY   m   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing". Various towns in England bear this name.
BENTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name, composed of Old English beonet "bent grass" and tun "enclosure".
BEORHTRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorht "bright" and ric "power, rule".
BEORHTSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorht "bright" and sige "victory".
BEORNRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorn "warrior, man" and ræd "counsel".
BEOWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Possibly means "bee wolf" (in effect equal to "bear") from Old English beo "bee" and wulf "wolf". This is the name of the main character in the anonymous 8th-century epic poem 'Beowulf'. Set in Denmark, the poem tells how he slays the monster Grendel and its mother at the request of king Hroðgar. After this Beowulf becomes the king of the Geats. The conclusion of the poem tells how Beawulf, in his old age, slays a dragon but is himself mortally wounded in the act.
BEVERLY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's novel 'Beverly of Graustark' (1904).
BLAKE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
BRAD   m   English
Short form of BRADLEY, BRADFORD, and other names beginning with Brad. A famous bearer is American actor Brad Pitt (1963-).
BRADLEY   m   English
From a surname which originally came from a place name meaning "broad clearing" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the World War II American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
BROOK   m & f   English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived near a brook.
BROOKS   m   English
From an English surname, a variant of BROOK.
BURT   m   English
Short form of BURTON.
BURTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "fortified town". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), an explorer of Africa and Asia.
CEADDA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of CHAD.
CENHELM   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of KENELM.
CENRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cene "bold" and ric "power".
CEOLMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ceol "keel" and mund "protection".
CHAD   m   English
From the Old English name Ceadda which is of unknown meaning, possibly based on Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century English saint. Borne primarily by Catholics, it was a rare name until the 1960s when it started to become more common amongst the general population. This is also the name of a country in Africa, though it originates from a different source.
CHADWICK   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the name of towns in England, meaning "settlement belonging to CHAD" in Old English.
CHESTER   m   English
From a surname which originally belonged to a person who came from Chester, an old Roman settlement in Britain. The name of the settlement came from Latin castrum "camp, fortress".
CHET   m   English
Short form of CHESTER.
CLAY   m   English
From an English surname that originally referred to a person who lived near or worked with clay. This name can also be a short form of CLAYTON.
CLAYTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from various English place names, all meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
CLIFF   m   English
Short form of CLIFFORD or CLIFTON.
CLIFFORD   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "ford by a cliff" in Old English.
CLIFTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "settlement by a cliff" in Old English.
CLINT   m   English
Short form of CLINTON. A notable bearer is American actor Clint Eastwood (1930-), who became famous early in his career for his western movies.
CLINTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally from an Old English place name meaning "settlement on the River Glyme". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Bill Clinton (1946-).
COLA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English byname meaning "charcoal", originally given to a person with dark features.
COLE   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the Old English byname COLA.
COLTEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of COLTON.
COLTON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "COLA's town".
CRAWFORD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "crow ford" in Old English.
CUTHBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of CUTHBERT.
CUTHBERT   m   English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements cuþ "famous" and beorht "bright". Saint Cuthbert was a 6th-century hermit who became the bishop of Lindisfarne, an island off the coast of England. He was known as performer of healing miracles. Because of the saint, this name remained in use in England even after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was (briefly) revived in the 19th century.
CYNEBALD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and beald "bold".
CYNEFRIÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "royal peace" from Old English cyne "royal" and friþ "peace".
CYNEHEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and heard "brave, hardy".
CYNEMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and mær "famous".
CYNERIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and ric "power".
CYNESIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and sige "victory".
CYNEWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and weard "guard".
DADO (1)   m   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO.
DALTON   m   English
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "valley town" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was John Dalton (1766-1844), the English chemist and physicist who theorized about the existence of atoms.
DARWIN   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name Deorwine which meant "dear friend". The surname was borne by the English naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882), the man who first proposed the theory of natural selection and subsequently revolutionized biology.
DEORWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements deor "dear" and wine "friend".
DEX   m   English
Short form of DEXTER.
DEXTER   m   English
From an occupational surname meaning "one who dyes" in Old English. It also coincides with the Latin word dexter meaning "right-handed, skilled".
DU   m   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO.
DUARTE   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of EDWARD. This name was borne by a 15th-century king of Portugal, who was named after his maternal ancestor Edward III of England.
DUDA   m & f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO or EDUARDA.
DUDDA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English byname possibly meaning "round".
DUDLEY   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "Dudda's clearing" in Old English. The surname was borne by a British noble family.
DUDU   m   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO.
DUNSTAN   m   English (Rare), Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements dunn "dark" and stan "stone". This name was borne by a 10th-century saint, the archbishop of Canterbury. It was occasionally used in the Middle Ages, though it died out after the 16th century. It was revived by the Tractarian movement in the 19th century.
EADBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and beorht "bright". This was the name of an 8th-century king of Northumbria and three kings of Kent.
EADBHÁRD   m   Irish
Irish form of EDWARD.
EADGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDGAR.
EADMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDMUND.
EADRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDRIC.
EADWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDWARD.
EADWIG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wig "war". This was the name of a Saxon king of England in the 10th century. The name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
EADWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDWIN.
EADWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wulf "wolf". This name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
EALDRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and ræd "counsel". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EALDWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EALHHERE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ealh "temple" and here "army".
EALHSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ealh "temple" combined with stan "stone".
ÉAMON   m   Irish
Variant of ÉAMONN. This name was borne by American-born Irish president Éamon de Valera (1882-1975), whose birth name was Edward.
EAMON   m   Irish
Variant of ÉAMONN.
ÉAMONN   m   Irish
Irish form of EDMUND.
EARDWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element eard "land" combined with wulf "wolf".
EASTMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ESMOND.
EASTON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning "east town" in Old English.
ECGBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EGBERT.
ED   m   English, Dutch
Short form of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDDY   m   English
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDE   m   Hungarian
Diminutive of EDVÁRD or EDUÁRD.
EDGAR   m   English, French
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gar "spear". This was the name of a 10th-century English king, Edgar the Peaceful. The name did not survive long after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 18th century, in part due to a character by this name in Sir Walter Scott's novel 'The Bride of Lammermoor' (1819), which tells of the tragic love between Edgar Ravenswood and Lucy Ashton. Famous bearers include author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), French impressionist painter Edgar Degas (1834-1917), and author Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950).
EDGARAS   m   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of EDGAR.
EDGARD   m   French
French variant of EDGAR.
EDGARDO   m   Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of EDGAR.
EDI   m   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene diminutive of EDVARD and a Croatian diminutive of EDUARD.
EDISON   m   English
From an English surname which meant either "son of EDA (2)" or "son of ADAM". A famous bearer of the surname was the inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).
EDMAO   m   Limburgish
Limburgish form of EDMUND. Its spelling has been influenced by the French pronunciation of Edmond.
EDMÉ   m   French (Archaic)
Short form of EDMOND.
EDMOND   m   French
French form of EDMUND. A notable bearer was the English astronomer Edmond Halley (1656-1742), for whom Halley's comet is named.
EDMONDO   m   Italian
Italian form of EDMUND.
EDMUND   m   English, German, Polish
From the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and mund "protection". This was the name of two Anglo-Saxon kings of England. It was also borne by two saints, including a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman conquest (even being used by king Henry III for one of his sons), though it became less common after the 15th century.... [more]
EDMUNDO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of EDMUND.
EDOARDO   m   Italian
Italian form of EDWARD.
EDORTA   m   Basque
Basque form of EDWARD.
ÉDOUARD   m   French
French form of EDWARD.
EDRIC   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and ric "rule". After the Norman conquest this Old English name was not commonly used. It has occasionally been revived in modern times.
EDU   m   Portuguese
Portuguese short form of EDUARDO.
EDUÁRD   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of EDWARD.
EDUARDO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of EDWARD.
EDUARDS   m   Latvian
Latvian form of EDWARD.
EDVÁRD   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of EDWARD.
EDVIN   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian
Scandinavian, Finnish, Estonian and Hungarian form of EDWIN.
EDWARD   m   English, Polish
Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and weard "guard". This was the name of several Anglo-Saxon kings, the last being Saint Edward the Confessor shortly before the Norman conquest in the 11th century. He was known as a just ruler, and because of his popularity his name remained in use after the conquest when most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. The 13th-century Plantagenet king Henry III named his son and successor after the saint, and seven subsequent kings of England were also named Edward.... [more]
EDWIN   m   English, Dutch
Means "rich friend" from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wine "friend". This was the name of a 7th-century Northumbrian king, regarded as a saint. After the Norman conquest the name was not popular, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century. A notable bearer was the astronaut Edwin Aldrin (1930-), also known as Buzz, the second man to walk on the moon.
EDWYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of EDWIN.
EETU   m   Finnish
Finnish form of EDWARD.
EGBERT   m   English, Dutch
Means "bright edge" from the Old English elements ecg "edge of a sword" and beorht "bright". This was the name of kings of Kent and Wessex as well as two English saints. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest but was revived in the 19th century.
EIDEARD   m   Scottish
Scottish form of EDWARD.
EKEWAKA   m   Hawaiian
Hawaiian form of EDWARD.
ELDRED   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from EALDRÆD.
ELMER   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English name ÆÐELMÆR. In the United States it is sometimes given in honour of brothers Jonathan (1745-1817) and Ebenezer Elmer (1752-1843), who were active in early American politics.
ELRIC   m   Medieval English
Middle English form of either of the Old English names ÆLFRIC or ÆÐELRIC. Both were rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ELVIN   m   English
Variant of ALVIN.
ELVIS   m   English
Meaning unknown. It could possibly be a derivative of ALVIS or ELWIN. More likely, it is from the rare surname Elvis, which is ultimately derived from the given name ELOISE. The name was brought to public attention by the singer Elvis Presley (1935-1977), whose name came from his father's middle name.
ELWIN   m   English
Variant of ALVIN.
ELWYN   m   English
Variant of ALVIN.
EOFORWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ESMOND   m   English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements east "grace" and mund "protection". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman conquest. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century.
ESMUND   m   English (Rare)
Variant of ESMOND.
ETHELBERT   m   English
Middle English form of ÆÐELBERHT. The name was very rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived briefly in the 19th century.
ETHELRED   m   English (Archaic)
Middle English form of ÆÐELRÆD. The name was very rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived briefly in the 19th century.
EWART   m   English
From an English and Scottish surname which was either based on a Norman form of EDWARD, or else derived from a place name of unknown meaning.
FOX   m   English (Rare)
Either from the English word fox or the surname Fox, which originally given as a nickname. The surname was borne by George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the Quakers.
FRED   m   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese
Short form of FREDERICK or other names containing the same element. A famous bearer was the American actor and dancer Fred Astaire (1899-1987).
FREDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of FREDERICK or FREDA.
FREDO   m   Italian (Rare)
Short form of FEDERICO, ALFREDO or GOFFREDO.
GLADWIN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name GLÆDWINE.
GLADWYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GLADWIN.
GLÆDWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements glæd "bright" and wine "friend". This name was not actually recorded in the Old English era, though it is attested starting in the 11th century.
GODRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "power of god", derived from Old English god combined with ric "power, rule". This name died out a few centuries after the Norman conquest.
GODWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "friend of god", derived from Old English god combined with wine "friend". This was the name of the powerful 11th-century Earl of Wessex, the father of King Harold II of England.
GOODWIN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the given name GODWINE.
HAL   m   English
Medieval diminutive of HARRY.
HARLEY   m & f   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HAROLD   m   English
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler". The Old Norse cognate Haraldr was also common among Scandinavian settlers in England. This was the name of five kings of Norway and three kings of Denmark. It was also borne by two kings of England, both of whom were from mixed Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon backgrounds, including Harold II who lost the Battle of Hastings (and was killed in it), which led to the Norman conquest. After the conquest the name died out, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century.
HAROLDO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of HAROLD.
HARRI   m   Finnish, Welsh
Finnish and Welsh form of HARRY.
HARRIS   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name HARRY.
HARRISON   m   English
From an English surname which meant "son of HARRY". This was the surname of two American presidents, William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) and his grandson Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901). The actor Harrison Ford (1942-), who starred in such movies as 'Star Wars' and 'Indiana Jones', is a famous bearer.
HARRY   m   English
Medieval English form of HENRY. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and HAROLD. A famous bearer was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It is also the name of the boy wizard in J. K. Rowling's 'Harry Potter' series of books, first released in 1997.
HEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Short form of various Old English names containing the element heard meaning "brave, hardy".
HEREWARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements here "army" and weard "guard". This was the name of an 11th-century Anglo-Saxon leader who rebelled against Norman rule.
HEREWEALD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of HAROLD.
HILDRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Older form of HILDRED.
HILDRED   f & m   English
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel". This name was revived in the late 19th century, probably because of its similarity to the popular names Hilda and Mildred.
HROÐGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Hrodger (see ROGER). The name became unused after the Normans introduced Hrodger after their invasion. In the Old English poem 'Beowulf' this is the name of the Danish king.
HROÐULF   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF). This name appears in 'Beowulf' belonging to the nephew of Hroðgar.
HUNTER   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
IRVIN   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of either IRVING or IRWIN.
IRWIN   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name EOFORWINE.
KENDRICK   m   English
From a surname which has several different origins. It could be from the Old English given names Cyneric "royal power" or Cenric "bold power", or from the Welsh name Cynwrig "chief hero". It can also be an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Mac Eanraig meaning "son of HENRY".
KENELM   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English name Cenhelm, which was composed of the elements cene "bold, keen" and helm "helmet". Saint Kenelm was a 9th-century martyr from Mercia, where he was a member of the royal family. The name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has since become rare.
KENNARD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given names CYNEWEARD or CYNEHEARD.
KENRICK   m   English (Rare)
Variant of KENDRICK.
KIM (1)   f & m   English
At the present it is usually considered a short form of KIMBERLY, but it in fact predates it as a given name. The author Rudyard Kipling used it for the title hero of his novel 'Kim' (1901), though in this case it was short for KIMBALL. In her novel 'Show Boat' (1926) Edna Ferber used it for a female character who was born on the Mississippi River and was named from the initials of the states Kentucky, Illinois and Mississippi. The name was popularized in America by the actresses Kim Hunter (1922-2002) and Kim Novak (1933-), both of whom assumed it as a stage name.
KIMBALL   m   English
From a surname which was derived from either the Welsh given name CYNBEL or the Old English given name CYNEBALD.
KOLE   m   English (Modern)
Variant of COLE.
KYNASTON   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "CYNEFRIÐ's town" in Old English.
LALO   m   Spanish
Diminutive of EDUARDO.
LEE   m & f   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. In his honour, it has been commonly used as a given name in the American South.
LEIGH   f & m   English
From a surname which was a variant of LEE.
LEOFDÆG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with dæg "day".
LEOFRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with ric "power".
LEOFSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and sige "victory".
LEOFSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with stan "stone".
LEOFWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "dear friend", derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and wine "friend". This was the name of an 8th-century English saint, also known as Lebuin, who did missionary work in Frisia.
LEWIN   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the given name LEOFWINE.
MAO (2)   m   Limburgish
Short form of EDMAO or REMAO.
MAX   m   German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Short form of MAXIMILIAN (or sometimes of MAXWELL in English).
MAXWELL   m   English
From a Scottish surname meaning "Mack's stream", from the name Mack, a short form of the Scandinavian name MAGNUS, combined with Old English wella "stream". A famous bearer of the surname was James Maxwell (1831-1879), a Scottish physicist who studied gases and electromagnetism.
MILTON   m   English
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "mill town" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was John Milton (1608-1674), the poet who wrote 'Paradise Lost'.
MONET   f & m   Various
From a French surname which was derived from either HAMON or EDMOND. This was the surname of the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
NED   m   English
Diminutive of EDWARD or EDMUND. It has been used since the 14th century, and may have had root in the medieval affectionate phrase mine Ed, which was later reinterpreted as my Ned.
ÖDI   m   Hungarian
Diminutive of ÖDÖN.
ÖDÖN   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of EDMUND.
OSBEORN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSBORN.
OSBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSBERT.
OSBERT   m   English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorht "bright". After the Norman conquest, this Old English name was merged with its Norman cognate. It was rare in the Middle Ages, and eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
OSBORN   m   English
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorn "bear". During the Anglo-Saxon period there was also a Norse cognate Ásbjörn used in England, and after the Norman conquest the Norman cognate Osbern was introduced. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
OSBORNE   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of OSBORN.
OSBOURNE   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of OSBORN.
ÓSCAR   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of OSCAR.
ÒSCAR   m   Catalan
Catalan form of OSCAR.
OSCAR   m   English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
OSGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and gar "spear".
ÓSKAR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of OSCAR.
OSKAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish
Scandinavian, German, Polish and Slovene form of OSCAR. A famous bearer was Oskar Schindler (1908-1974), who saved over a thousand Polish Jews during World War II.
OSKARI   m   Finnish
Finnish form of OSCAR.
OSKARS   m   Latvian
Latvian form of OSCAR.
OSKU   m   Finnish
Short form of OSKARI.
OSMOND   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and mund "protection". During the Anglo-Saxon period a Norse cognate Ásmundr was also used in England, and another version was imported by the Normans. Saint Osmund was an 11th-century Norman nobleman who became an English bishop. Though it eventually became rare, it was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
OSMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSMOND.
OSVALDO   m   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of OSWALD.
OSWALD   m   English, German, Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler". Saint Oswald was a king of Northumbria who introduced Christianity to northeast England in the 7th century before being killed in battle. There was also an Old Norse cognate Ásvaldr in use in England, being borne by the 10th-century Saint Oswald of Worcester, who was of Danish ancestry. Though the name had died out by the end of the Middle Ages, it was revived in the 19th century.
OSWIN   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and wine "friend". Saint Oswin was a 7th-century king of Northumbria. After the Norman conquest this name was used less, and it died out after the 14th century. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
OSWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSWIN.
OSZKÁR   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of OSCAR.
OZ (1)   m   English
Short form of OSWALD, OSBORN, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
OŽBALT   m   Slovene
Slovene form of OSWALD.
OŽBEJ   m   Slovene
Slovene variant form of OSWALD.
OZZIE   m   English
Diminutive of OSWALD, OSBORN, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
OZZY   m   English
Variant of OZZIE.
PÆGA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name of unknown meaning.
PARRY   m   Welsh
From a Welsh surname which was derived from ap Harry meaning "son of HARRY".
PAYTON   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of PEYTON.
PEYTON   m & f   English
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "PÆGA's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress. It is also borne by American football quarterback Peyton Manning (1976-).
PRESLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest clearing" (Old English preost and leah). This surname was borne by musician Elvis Presley (1935-1977).
PUCK   m & f   Anglo-Saxon Mythology, Dutch
Meaning unknown, from Old English puca. It could ultimately be of either Germanic or Celtic origin. In English legend this was the name of a mischievous spirit, also known as Robin Goodfellow. He appears in Shakespeare's play 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1600).
ROYSTON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "town of Royse". The given name Royse was a medieval variant of ROSE.
SÆWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements "sea" and wine "friend".
SEWARD   m   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Old English given name SIGEWEARD.
SHAD (2)   m   English
Perhaps a variant of CHAD.
SIGEBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "bright victory", derived from Old English sige "victory" and beorht "bright". This was the name of a king of Wessex. The name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
SIGEWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements sige "victory" and weard "guard, guardian".
SMITH   m   English
From an English surname meaning "metal worker, blacksmith", derived from Old English smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world.
STONE   m & f   English (Modern)
From the English vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English stan.
STORM   m & f   English (Modern), Danish, Norwegian
From the vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English storm, or in the case of the Scandinavian name, from Old Norse stormr.
SWIÐHUN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of SWITHIN.
SWITHIN   m   History
From the Old English name Swiðhun or Swiþhun, derived from swiþ "strong" and perhaps hun "bear cub". Saint Swithin was a 9th-century bishop of Winchester.
SWITHUN   m   History
Variant of SWITHIN.
TATA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name of unknown meaning.
TATE   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name Tata, of unknown origin.
TATTON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "Tata's town" in Old English.
TED   m   English
Short form of EDWARD or THEODORE. A famous bearer was the American baseball player Ted Williams (1918-2002), who was born as Theodore.
TEDDY   m   English
Diminutive of EDWARD or THEODORE.
ÞUNOR   m   Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Anglo-Saxon cognate of Þórr (see THOR).
ULRIC   m   English (Rare)
Middle English form of the Old English name Wulfric meaning "wolf power". When it is used in modern times, it is usually as a variant of ULRICH.
VAN   m   English
Short form of names containing van, such as VANCE or IVAN.
VANCE   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Old English fenn meaning "marsh, fen".
WALTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally taken from various Old English place names meaning "stream town", "wood town", or "wall town".
WARD   m   English
From an occupational surname for a watchman, derived from Old English weard "guard".
WARRICK   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of WARWICK.
WARWICK   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the name of a town in England, itself from Old English wer "weir, dam" and wíc "settlement".
WASHINGTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English town, itself meaning "settlement belonging to WASSA's people". The given name is usually given in honour of George Washington (1732-1799), commander of the Continental Army during the American Revolution and the first president of the United States.
WAYNE   m   English
From an occupational surname meaning "wagon maker", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". Use of it as a given name can be partly attributed to the popularity of the actor John Wayne (1907-1979). Another famous bearer is Canadian hockey player Wayne Gretzky (1961-), generally considered the greatest player in the history of the sport.
WEALDMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements weald "power, leader, ruler" and mær "famous".
WEALHMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wealh "foreigner, Celt" and mær "famous".
WEBSTER   m   English
From an occupational surname meaning "weaver", derived from Old English webba.
WEMBA   m   Anglo-Saxon (Rare)
Byname derived from Old English wamb meaning "belly".
WES   m   English
Short form of WESLEY.
WESLEY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.
WESTLEY   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of WESLEY.
WHITNEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "white island" in Old English. Its popular use as a feminine name was initiated by actress Whitney Blake (1925-2002) in the 1960s, and further boosted in the 1980s by singer Whitney Houston (1963-2012).
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