Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the origin is Old Norse.
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ODDMUNDmNorwegian
Possibly a modern coinage based on the Old Norse elements oddr "point of a sword" and mundr "protection".
ODDRmAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of ODD.
ODENmNorse Mythology
Swedish form of ODIN.
ODINmNorse Mythology, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn, which was derived from óðr "inspiration, rage, frenzy". It ultimately developed from the early Germanic *Woðanaz. The name appears as Woden in Anglo-Saxon sources (for example, as the founder of several royal lineages in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle) and in forms such as Wotan, Wuotan or Wodan in continental Europe. However Odin is most known from Norse mythology, as the highest of the gods, presiding over art, war, wisdom and death. He resided in Valhalla, where warriors went after they were slain.
OLA (1)mNorwegian, Swedish
Norwegian and Swedish short form of OLAF.
OLAFmNorwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Polish
From the Old Norse name Áleifr meaning "ancestor's descendant", derived from the elements anu "ancestor" and leifr "descendant". This was the name of five kings of Norway, including Saint Olaf (Olaf II).
ÓLAFURmIcelandic
Icelandic form of OLAF.
OLAVImFinnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of OLAF.
OLAVOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of OLAF.
ÓLAVURmFaroese
Faroese form of OLAF.
OLEmDanish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of OLAF.
OLEGmRussian
Russian form of HELGE. The Varangians brought this name from Scandinavia to Russia. It was borne by an important 10th-century grand prince of Kiev.
OLEHmUkrainian
Ukrainian form of OLEG.
OLEVmEstonian
Estonian form of OLAF.
OLImEnglish
Short form of OLIVER.
OLIVÉRmHungarian
Hungarian form of OLIVER.
OLIVERmEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
OLIVIERmFrench, Dutch
French and Dutch form of OLIVER.
OLIVIEROmItalian
Italian form of OLIVER.
OLIWERmPolish (Rare)
Polish form of OLIVER.
OLLEmSwedish
Swedish diminutive of OLAF.
OLLImFinnish
Finnish diminutive of OLAVI.
OLLIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of OLIVER, OLIVIA or OLIVE.
OLOFmSwedish
Swedish form of OLAF.
OLOVmSwedish
Swedish form of OLAF.
OLUFmDanish
Danish variant of OLAF.
ǪRVARmNorse Mythology
Old Norse form of ORVAR.
ORVARmSwedish, Norse Mythology
Means "arrow" in Old Norse. Orvar Odd is a legendary Norse hero who is the subject of a 13th-century Icelandic saga.
OSBORNmEnglish
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorn "bear". During the Anglo-Saxon period there was also a Norse cognate Ásbjörn used in England, and after the Norman conquest the Norman cognate Osbern was introduced. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
OSBORNEmEnglish
From a surname which was a variant of OSBORN.
OSBOURNEmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of OSBORN.
ÓSCARmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of OSCAR.
ÒSCARmCatalan
Catalan form of OSCAR.
OSCARmEnglish, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
ÓSKARmIcelandic
Icelandic form of OSCAR.
OSKARmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish
Scandinavian, German, Polish and Slovene form of OSCAR. A famous bearer was Oskar Schindler (1908-1974), who saved over 1,000 Polish Jews during World War II.
OSKARImFinnish
Finnish form of OSCAR.
OSKARSmLatvian
Latvian form of OSCAR.
OSKUmFinnish
Short form of OSKARI.
OSMONDmEnglish (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and mund "protection". During the Anglo-Saxon period a Norse cognate Ásmundr was also used in England, and another version was imported by the Normans. Saint Osmund was an 11th-century Norman nobleman who became an English bishop. Though it eventually became rare, it was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
ÖSTENmSwedish
Swedish form of EYSTEINN.
OSVALDmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian cognate of OSWALD.
OSZKÁRmHungarian
Hungarian form of OSCAR.
ÓÐINNmNorse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of ODIN.
OVEmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Probably a modern form of the Old Danish name Aghi, originally a short form of names that contain the Old Norse element egg "edge of a sword" or agi "terror".
ØYSTEINmNorwegian
Norwegian form of EYSTEINN.
ØYVINDmNorwegian
From the Old Norse name Eyvindr, which was derived from ey meaning "island" or "good fortune" and vindr possibly meaning "victor".
OZ (1)mEnglish
Short form of OSWALD, OSBORN, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
OZZIEmEnglish
Diminutive of OSWALD, OSBORN, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
OZZYmEnglish
Variant of OZZIE.
RAFEmEnglish
Variant of RALPH. This form became common during the 17th century, reflecting the usual pronunciation.
RAGNARmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian cognate of RAYNER.
RAGNVALDmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern Scandinavian form of RAGNVALDR.
RAGNVALDRmAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse name composed of the elements regin "advice, counsel" and valdr "power, ruler" (making it a cognate of REYNOLD).
RALPHmEnglish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Contracted form of the Old Norse name RÁÐÚLFR (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence. In the Middle Ages it was usually spelled Ralf, but by the 17th century it was most commonly Rafe, reflecting the normal pronunciation. The Ralph spelling appeared in the 18th century. A famous bearer of the name was Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism.
RALPHIEmEnglish
Diminutive of RALPH.
RANDALLmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name RANDEL.
RANDELmMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of RANDOLF and other names beginning with the Germanic element rand meaning "rim (of a shield)".
RANDOLFmEnglish
From the Germanic elements rand meaning "rim (of a shield)" and wulf meaning "wolf". The Normans brought this name to England, where there existed already an Old Norse cognate Randúlfr, which had been introduced by Scandinavian settlers. Randolf became rare after the Middle Ages, though it was revived in the 18th century (usually in the spelling Randolph).
RANDOLPHmEnglish
Variant of RANDOLF. This spelling was adopted in the 18th century.
RANDYm & fEnglish
Diminutive of RANDALL, RANDOLF or MIRANDA.
RANULFmScottish
Scottish form of the Old Norse name Randúlfr, a cognate of RANDOLF. Scandinavian settlers and invaders introduced this name to Scotland in the Middle Ages.
RÁÐÚLFRmAncient Scandinavian
Derived from the Norse elements ráð meaning "counsel" and úlfr meaning "wolf".
REIDARmNorwegian
From the Old Norse name Hreiðarr which was derived from the elements hreiðr "nest, home" and arr "warrior".
ROALDmNorwegian
Modern form of the Old Norse name Hróðvaldr or Hróaldr, composed of the elements hróðr "fame" and valdr "ruler". This name was borne by the children's author Roald Dahl (1916-1990).
ROARmNorwegian
Newer Scandinavian form of HRÓARR.
ROFFEmSwedish
Swedish diminutive of ROLF.
ROLFmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
From the Germanic name Hrolf (or its Old Norse cognate Hrólfr), a contracted form of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF). The Normans introduced this name to England but it soon became rare. In the modern era it has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world as a German import.
ROLLOmEnglish
Latinized form of Roul, the Old French form of ROLF. Rollo (or Rolf) the Ganger was an exiled Viking who, in the 10th century, became the first Duke of Normandy. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
RON (1)mEnglish
Short form of RONALD.
RONALDmScottish, English
Scottish form of RAGNVALDR, a name introduced to Scotland by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. It became popular outside Scotland during the 20th century. A famous bearer was American actor and president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004).
RONALDOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of RONALD. A notable bearer is the retired Brazilian soccer player Ronaldo Luís Nazário de Lima (1976-), who is commonly known only by his first name.
RONNIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of RONALD or VERONICA.
RONNYmEnglish
Diminutive of RONALD.
ROULmMedieval French, Medieval English
Norman French form of ROLF.
RUARCmIrish
Probably an Irish form of HRŒREKR, introduced by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. Alternatively it may be derived from Irish ruarc "squall, rainstorm".
RUDOLFmGerman, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Russian, Armenian
From the Germanic name Hrodulf, which was derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wulf "wolf". It was borne by three kings of Burgundy, as well as several Habsburg rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria. Anthony Hope used this name for the hero in his popular novel 'The Prisoner of Zenda' (1894).
RÚNARmIcelandic
Icelandic form of RUNAR.
RUNARmNorwegian
Derived from the Old Norse elements rún "secret lore" and arr "warrior". This name did not exist in Old Norse, but was created in the modern era.
RUNEmNorwegian, Danish, Swedish
Derived from Old Norse rún meaning "secret lore".
RÚNImAncient Scandinavian, Faroese
Old Norse and Faroese form of RUNE.
RURIKmRussian
Russian form of the Old Norse name HRŒREKR.
SELBYm & fEnglish (Rare)
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "willow farm" in Old Norse.
SHELBYm & fEnglish
From a surname, which was possibly a variant of SELBY. Though previously in use as a rare masculine name, it was popularized as a feminine name by the main character in the movie 'The Woman in Red' (1935). It was later reinforced by the movie 'Steel Magnolias' (1989) in which Julia Roberts played a character by this name.
SIGFRID (1)mSwedish
Swedish form of SIEGFRIED.
SIGGEmSwedish
Diminutive of SIGMUND, SIGFRID (1), and other Germanic names beginning with the element sigu which means "victory".
SIGMUNDmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and mund "protector" (or in the case of the Scandinavian cognate, from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and mundr "protector"). In Norse mythology this was the name of the hero Sigurd's father, the bearer of the powerful sword Gram. A notable bearer was the Austrian psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the creator of the revolutionary theory of psychoanalysis.
SIGURDmNorwegian, Danish, Swedish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Sigurðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and varðr "guardian". Sigurd was the hero of the Norse legend the 'Volsungasaga', which tells how his foster-father Regin sent him to recover a hoard of gold guarded by the dragon Fafnir. After slaying the dragon Sigurd tasted some of its blood, enabling him to understand the language of birds, who told him that Regin was planning to betray him. In a later adventure, Sigurd disguised himself as Gunnar (his wife Gudrun's brother) and rescued the maiden Brynhildr from a ring of fire, with the result that Gunnar and Brynhildr were married. When the truth eventually came out, Brynhildr took revenge upon Sigurd. The stories of the German hero Siegfried were in part based on him.
SIGURÐURmIcelandic
Icelandic form of SIGURD.
SIGVARDmSwedish
Swedish form of SIGURD.
SINDREmNorwegian
Norwegian form of SINDRI.
SINDRImNorse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Possibly means either "small, trivial" or else "sparkling" in Old Norse. In Norse legend this was the name of a dwarf who, with his brother Brokk, made many magical items for the gods.
SIXTENmSwedish
From the Old Norse name Sigsteinn, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and steinn "stone".
SJURDmNorwegian
Norwegian form of SIGURD.
SNORREmNorwegian
Norwegian form of SNORRI.
SNORRImAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Derived from Old Norse snerra "attack, onslaught". This name was borne by Snorri Sturluson, a 13th-century Icelandic historian and poet, the author of the Prose Edda.
SOINImFinnish
Finnish form of SVEN.
SOMERLEDmScottish
Anglicized form of the Old Norse name Somarliðr meaning "summer traveller". This was the name of a 12th-century Scottish warlord who created a kingdom on the Scottish islands.
SOMHAIRLEmScottish, Irish
Gaelic form of Somarliðr (see SOMERLED).
SORLEYmScottish, Irish
Anglicized form of SOMHAIRLE.
STEENmDanish
Danish cognate of STEN.
STEINmNorwegian
Norwegian cognate of STEN.
STEINARmNorwegian
From the Old Norse name Steinarr, derived from the elements steinn "stone" and arr "warrior".
STEINNmIcelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse and Icelandic form of STEN.
STENmSwedish, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
Derived from the Old Norse name Steinn meaning "stone".
STIANmNorwegian
Modern form of STÍGANDR.
STIGmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of STIGR.
STÍGANDRmAncient Scandinavian
Means "wanderer" in Old Norse.
STIGRmAncient Scandinavian
Means "path" in Old Norse.
STORMm & fEnglish (Modern), Danish, Norwegian
From the vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English storm, or in the case of the Scandinavian name, from Old Norse stormr.
SVEINmNorwegian
Norwegian variant of SVEN.
SVEINNmAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of SVEN.
SVENmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
From the Old Norse byname Sveinn which meant "boy". This was the name of kings of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
SVENDmDanish, Norwegian
Danish form of SVEN.
SVERREmNorwegian
From the Old Norse name Sverrir which meant "wild, swinging, spinning".
SVERRIRmAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse form of SVERRE, as well as the modern Icelandic form.
TARBENmDanish
Danish form of TORBJÖRN.
TASGALLmScottish
Scottish form of ÁSKETILL.
TASKILLmScottish
Anglicized form of TASGALL.
TERJE (1)mNorwegian
Norwegian variant of TORGEIR.
ÞÓRmIcelandic
Icelandic form of Þórr (see THOR).
THORmNorse Mythology, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
From the Old Norse Þórr meaning "thunder", ultimately from the early Germanic *Þunraz. Thor was the Norse god of strength, thunder, war and storms, the son of Odin. He was armed with a hammer called Mjolnir, and wore an enchanted belt that doubled his strength.
ÞÓRARINNmAncient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with arn "eagle".
ÞORBJÖRNmIcelandic
Icelandic form of ÞÓRBJÖRN.
THORBURNmEnglish (Rare)
From a Scottish and English surname which was derived from the Norse name Þórbjörn (see TORBJÖRN).
ÞÓRFASTRmAncient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements Þórr (see THOR) and fastr "firm".
ÞÓRFREÐRmAncient Scandinavian
Derived from the Old Norse elements Þórr (see THOR) and friðr "peace".
ÞÓRGÍSLmAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse name meaning "Thor's shaft" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with gísl "shaft, arrow".
ÞÓRIRmIcelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "Thor's warrior" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with Old Norse vér "warrior, fighter".
ÞÓRRmNorse Mythology
Original Old Norse form of THOR.
THORSTEINmNorwegian
Norwegian form of TORSTEN.
THURSTANmEnglish (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the Norse name Þórsteinn (see TORSTEN).
THYGEmDanish
Variant of TYGE.
TIWmAnglo-Saxon Mythology
Anglo-Saxon form of Tiwaz (see TYR).
TÓKImAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of TYGE.
TOLLAKmNorwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórleikr, which meant "Thor's play" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with leikr "play, game (involving weapons)".
TORmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern Scandinavian form of Þórr (see THOR). It was not used as a personal name until the 18th century. It is sometimes used as a short form of names of Old Norse origin that begin with the element Tor, which is also from Þórr.
TORBENmDanish, German
Danish form of TORBJÖRN.
TORBJÖRNmSwedish
From the Old Norse name Þórbjörn, which meant "Thor's bear" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with björn "bear".
TORBJØRNmDanish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of TORBJÖRN.
TORCUILmScottish
Scottish form of Þórketill (see TORKEL).
TORE (1)mSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Probably from the Old Norse name ÞÓRIR.
TORGEIRmNorwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórgeirr, which meant "Thor's spear" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with geirr "spear".
TORGNYmSwedish
From the Old Norse name Þórgnýr meaning "Thor's noise" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with gnýr "noise, grumble, murmur".
TORKELmNorwegian, Swedish
From the Old Norse name Þórketill meaning "Thor's cauldron" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with ketill "cauldron".
TORLEIFmNorwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórleifr meaning "Thor's descendant" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with leifr "descendant, heir".
TORMODmNorwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórmóðr, which meant "Thor's mind" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with móðr "mind, mood".
TORQUILmScottish
Anglicized form of TORCUIL.
TORSTEINmNorwegian
Norwegian form of TORSTEN.
TORSTENmSwedish, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Þórsteinn, which meant "Thor's stone" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with steinn "stone".
TORSTImFinnish
Finnish form of TORSTEN.
TORVALDmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Þórvaldr, which meant "Thor's ruler" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with valdr "ruler".
TROELSmDanish
Danish form of ÞÓRGÍSL.
TRONDmNorwegian
From the Old Norse byname Þróndr which indicated a person from Trøndelag, a region in central Norway, possibly derived from þróast meaning "to grow, to prosper".
TRULSmNorwegian, Swedish
Norwegian and Swedish form of ÞÓRGÍSL.
TRYGGVImIcelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse and Icelandic form of TRYGVE.
TRYGVEmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Derived from Old Norse tryggr meaning "trustworthy".
TUEmDanish
Danish form of TÓFI.
TUREmSwedish
Variant of TORE (1).
TUUKKAmFinnish
Finnish diminutive of TUURE.
TUUREmFinnish
Finnish form of TORE (1).
TYCHOmDanish, Dutch
Latinized form of TYGE. This name was borne by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe (1546-1601).
TYGEmDanish
Danish form of Tóki, an Old Norse diminutive of names containing the element Þórr, from the name of the Norse god THOR. This was the native name of the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe (1546-1601).
TYGOmDutch
Dutch form of TYGE.
TYKOmFinnish (Archaic)
Finnish form of TYGE.
TÝRmNorse Mythology
Old Norse form of TYR.
TYRmNorse Mythology
Norse form of the name of the Germanic god Tiwaz, related to Indo-European dyeus (see ZEUS). In Norse mythology Tyr was the god of war and justice, the son of the god Odin. He carried a spear in his left hand, since his right hand was bitten off by the wolf Fenrir. At the time of the end of the world, the Ragnarok, Tyr will slay and be slain by the giant hound Garm.
UFFEmDanish
Variant of ULF.
UILLEAGmIrish
Either an Irish form of the Old Norse name HUGLEIKR, or else a diminutive of UILLIAM.
ÙISDEANmScottish
Scottish Gaelic form of the Old Norse name EYSTEINN.
ULFmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse byname Úlfr meaning "wolf".
ÚLFRmAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of ULF.
ULICKmIrish
Anglicized form of UILLEAG.
UOLEVImFinnish
Finnish form of OLAF.
UWEmGerman
German form of OVE.
VIDARmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse Víðarr, which is possibly derived from víðr "wide" and arr "warrior". In Norse mythology Víðarr was the son of Odin and Grid. At the time of the end of the world, the Ragnarok, he will avenge his father's death.
VIGGOmNorwegian, Danish, Swedish
Short form of names containing the Old Norse element víg "war".
VÍGImAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of VIGGO.
VIKINGmSwedish
From the Old Norse name Víkingr meaning "viking, raider", ultimately from vík "bay, inlet".
VÍÐARRmNorse Mythology
Old Norse form of VIDAR.
VRAGImAncient Scandinavian
Old Norse byname possibly meaning "mooring post".
WODANmGermanic Mythology
Continental Germanic cognate of Óðinn (see ODIN).
WODENmAnglo-Saxon Mythology
Anglo-Saxon cognate of Óðinn (see ODIN). The day of the week Wednesday is named for him.
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