Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the usage is American.
There are 1,699 names matching your criteria. This is page 5.

NOAH (1)   m   English, Biblical
Derived from the Hebrew name נוֹחַ (Noach) meaning "rest, comfort"... [more]
NOBLE   m   English
From an English surname meaning "noble, notable". The name can also be given in direct reference to the English word noble.
NOEL   m   English
English form of NOËL.
NOLAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Nualláin meaning "descendant of NUALLÁN". The baseball player Nolan Ryan (1947-) is a famous bearer of this name.
NORBERT   m   German, English, Dutch, French, Hungarian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements nord "north" and beraht "bright"... [more]
NORM   m   English
Short form of NORMAN.
NORMAN   m   English, Ancient Germanic
From an old Germanic byname meaning "northman", referring to a Viking. The Normans were Vikings who settled on the coast of France, in the region that became known as Normandy... [more]
NORMAND   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the same source as the name NORMAN.
NORRIS   m   English
From an English surname, either NORRIS (1) or NORRIS (2).
NORTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "north town" in Old English.
NORWOOD   m   English
From a surname which was originally taken from a place name meaning "north wood" in Old English.
NOWELL   m   English (Rare)
From the surname Nowell (a variant of NOEL).
OCEAN   m & f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word ocean for a large body of water. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ωκεανος (Okeanos), the name of the body of water thought to surround the Earth.
ODELL   m & f   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "woad hill" in Old English. A woad is a herb used for dying.
ODIN   m   Norse Mythology, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn which was derived from óðr "inspiration, rage, frenzy". It ultimately developed from the early Germanic *Woðanaz... [more]
OGDEN   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "oak valley" in Old English. A famous bearer was the humourous American poet Ogden Nash (1902-1971).
OLI   m   English
Short form of OLIVER.
OLIVER   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF)... [more]
OLLIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of OLIVER, OLIVIA or OLIVE.
OMAR (1)   m   Arabic, English
Variant transcription of UMAR. This is the usual English spelling of the 12th-century poet Umar Khayyam's name. In his honour it has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world, notably for the American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
ORA (1)   f & m   English
Perhaps based on Latin oro "to pray". It was first used in America in the 19th century.
ORAL   m   English (Rare)
Meaning uncertain. This name was borne by the influential American evangelist Oral Roberts (1918-2009), who was apparently named by his cousin.
ORMOND   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Ruaidh meaning "descendant of RUADH".
ORMONDE   m   English (Rare)
Variant of ORMOND.
ORRELL   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "ore hill" in Old English.
ORSON   m   English
From an English surname which was originally a nickname meaning "bear cub", from a diminutive of Norman French ors "bear", ultimately from Latin ursus... [more]
ORVAL   m   English
Variant of ORVILLE.
ORVILLE   m   English
This name was invented by the 18th-century writer Fanny Burney, who perhaps intended it to mean "golden city" in French. Orville Wright (1871-1948), together with his brother Wilbur, invented the first successful airplane.
OSBERT   m   English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorht "bright"... [more]
OSBORN   m   English
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorn "bear". During the Anglo-Saxon period there was also a Norse cognate Ásbjörn used in England, and after the Norman conquest the Norman cognate Osbern was introduced... [more]
OSBORNE   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of OSBORN.
OSBOURNE   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of OSBORN.
OSCAR   m   English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers... [more]
OSMOND   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and mund "protection". During the Anglo-Saxon period a Norse cognate Ásmundr was also used in England, and another version was imported by the Normans... [more]
OSWALD   m   English, German, Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler"... [more]
OSWIN   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and wine "friend". Saint Oswin was a 7th-century king of Northumbria... [more]
OTIS   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name Ode, a cognate of OTTO. In America it has been used in honour of the revolutionary James Otis (1725-1783).
OTTO   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
Later German form of Audo or Odo, originally a short form of various names beginning with the Germanic element aud meaning "wealth, fortune"... [more]
OWEN (1)   m   Welsh, English
Modern form of OWAIN.
OZ (1)   m   English
Short form of OSWALD, OSBORN, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
OZZIE   m   English
Diminutive of OSWALD, OSBORN, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
OZZY   m   English
Variant of OZZIE.
PACE   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the Middle English word pace meaning "peace".
PACEY   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the French place name Pacy, itself derived from Gaulish given name of unknown meaning.
PADEN   m   English (Rare)
An invented name, using the popular aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan... [more]
PAGE   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of PAIGE.
PALMER   m   English
From an English surname meaning "pilgrim". It is ultimately from Latin palma "palm tree", since pilgrims to the Holy Land often brought back palm fronds as proof of their journey.
PANCRAS   m   English (Archaic)
Medieval English form of PANCRATIUS. The relics of the 4th-century saint Pancratius were sent to England by Pope Gregory the Great, leading to the saint's veneration there.
PARKER   m & f   English
From an English occupational surname which meant "keeper of the park".
PARRIS   m & f   English (Rare)
From an English surname which originally denoted a person who came from the French city of Paris (see PARIS (2)).
PAT   m & f   English
Short form of PATRICK or PATRICIA. A famous bearer of this name was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
PATRICK   m   Irish, English, French, German
From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders... [more]
PATSY   f & m   English, Irish
Variant of PATTY, also used as a diminutive of PATRICK.
PATTON   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of PATRICK. A notable bearer of the surname was the American World War II general George S. Patton (1885-1945), who played an important part in the allied offensive in France.
PAUL   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Biblical
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him... [more]
PAULIE   m   English
Diminutive of PAUL.
PAXTON   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was derived from an English place name meaning "Pœcc's town". Pœcc is an Old English name of unknown meaning.
PAYTON   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of PEYTON.
PEARCE   m   English (Rare)
Variant of PIERCE.
PEERS   m   English (Rare)
Variant of PIERS.
PERCE   m   English
Short form of PERCY.
PERCIVAL   m   Arthurian Romance, English
Created by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his poem 'Perceval, the Story of the Grail'. In the poem Perceval was one of King Arthur's Knights of the Round Table who was given a glimpse of the Holy Grail... [more]
PERCY   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the name of a Norman town Perci, which was itself perhaps derived from a Gaulish given name which was Latinized as Persius... [more]
PEREGRINE   m   English (Rare)
From the Late Latin name Peregrinus, which meant "traveller". This was the name of several early saints.
PERRY   m   English
From a surname which is either English or Welsh in origin. It can be derived from Middle English perrie meaning "pear tree", or else from Welsh ap Herry, meaning "son of HERRY"... [more]
PETE   m   English
Short form of PETER.
PETER   m   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical
Derived from the Greek Πετρος (Petros) meaning "stone"... [more]
PEYTON   m & f   English
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "PÆGA's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress... [more]
PHIL   m   English
Short form of PHILIP and various other names beginning with Phil, often a Greek element meaning "friend, dear, beloved".
PHILANDER   m   English (Archaic), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Φιλανδρος (Philandros) meaning "friend of man" from Greek φιλος (philos) "friend" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος)... [more]
PHILIP   m   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
From the Greek name Φιλιππος (Philippos) which means "friend of horses", composed of the elements φιλος (philos) "friend, lover" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse"... [more]
PHILLIP   m   English
Variant of PHILIP, inspired by the usual spelling of the surname.
PHOENIX   m & f   English (Modern)
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird which appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years... [more]
PIERCE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name PIERS.
PIP   m   English
Diminutive of PHILIP. This was the name of the main character in 'Great Expectations' (1860) by Charles Dickens.
PLACID   m   English (Rare)
English form of Placidus (see PLACIDO).
PORTER   m   English
From an occupational English surname meaning "doorkeeper", ultimately from Old French porte "door", from Latin porta.
PRESLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest clearing" (Old English preost and leah). This surname was borne by musician Elvis Presley (1935-1977).
PRESTON   m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest town" (Old English preost and tun).
PRINCE   m   English
From the English word prince, a royal title, which comes ultimately from Latin princeps. This name was borne by the American musician Prince Rogers Nelson (1958-2016), who is known simply as Prince.
PROSPER   m   French, English
From the Latin name Prosperus, which meant "fortunate, successful". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a supporter of Saint Augustine. It has never been common as an English name, though the Puritans used it, partly because it is identical to the English word prosper.
PRUDENCE   f & m   English, French
Medieval English form of Prudentia, the feminine form of PRUDENTIUS. In France it is both the feminine form and a rare masculine form... [more]
PURDIE   m & f   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the Norman French expression pur die "by God". It was perhaps originally a nickname for a person who used the oath frequently.
QUENTIN   m   French, English
French form of the Roman name QUINTINUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint, a missionary who was martyred in Gaul. The Normans introduced this name to England... [more]
QUIN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of QUINN.
QUINCEY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of QUINCY.
QUINCY   m   English
From a surname which was derived (via the place name CUINCHY) from the given name QUINTUS... [more]
QUINLAN   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caoinlean meaning "descendant of Caoinlean". The name Caoinlean means "slender" in Gaelic.
QUINN   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of CONN".
QUINTEN   m   English, Dutch
Variant and Dutch form of QUENTIN.
QUINTIN   m   English
Variant of QUENTIN.
QUINTON   m   English
Variant of QUENTIN, also coinciding with an English surname meaning "queen's town" in Old English.
RADCLIFF   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "red cliff" in Old English.
RADCLYFFE   m   English (Rare)
From a surname, a variant of RADCLIFF.
RAEBURN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "stream where does drink" in Middle English. A famous bearer of the surname was Scottish portrait painter Sir Henry Raeburn (1756-1823).
RAFE   m   English
Variant of RALPH. This form became common during the 17th century, reflecting the usual pronunciation.
RAFFERTY   m   English
From an Irish surname which was an Anglicized form of Ó Rabhartaigh meaning "descendant of Rabhartach". The given name Rabhartach means "flood tide".
RAIN (1)   f & m   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word rain, derived from Old English regn.
RAINE   f & m   English (Rare)
Possibly based on the French word reine meaning "queen". A famous bearer is the British socialite Raine Spencer (1929-), the stepmother of Princess Diana... [more]
RALEIGH   m   English
From a surname which was from a place name meaning either "red clearing" or "roe deer clearing" in Old English.
RALPH   m   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Contracted form of the Old Norse name RÁÐÚLFR (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence... [more]
RALPHIE   m   English
Diminutive of RALPH.
RAMSEY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "wild-garlic island" in Old English.
RANDAL   m   English
Variant of RANDALL.
RANDALL   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name RANDEL.
RANDELL   m   English
Variant of RANDALL.
RANDOLF   m   English
From the Germanic elements rand meaning "rim (of a shield)" and wulf meaning "wolf"... [more]
RANDOLPH   m   English
Variant of RANDOLF. This spelling was adopted in the 18th century.
RANDY   m & f   English
Diminutive of RANDALL, RANDOLF or MIRANDA.
RAPHAEL   m   German, French, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) which meant "God has healed"... [more]
RASHAUN   m   African American (Rare)
Combination of the prefix Ra with the name SHAUN.
RASHAWN   m   African American (Modern)
Combination of the prefix Ra with the name SHAWN.
RASTUS   m   English (Rare)
Short form of ERASTUS.
RAVEN   f & m   English
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.
RAY   m   English
Short form of RAYMOND, often used as an independent name. It coincides with an English word meaning "beam of light". Science-fiction author Ray Bradbury (1920-2012) and musician Ray Charles (1930-2004) are two notable bearers of the name.
RAYMOND   m   English, French
From the Germanic name Raginmund, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and mund "protector"... [more]
RAYMUND   m   English (Rare)
Variant of RAYMOND.
RAYNARD   m   English
Variant of REYNARD.
RAYNER   m   English (Archaic)
From the Germanic name Raganhar, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hari "army"... [more]
READ   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of REED.
REAGAN   f & m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ríagáin meaning "descendant of RIAGÁN"... [more]
RED   m   English
From the English word, ultimately derived from Old English read. It was originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion.
REDD   m   English (Rare)
Variant of RED.
REED   m   English
From an English surname which comes from multiple sources, including Old English read meaning "red" (originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion) and Old English ried meaning "clearing" (given to a person who lived in a clearing in the woods).
REG   m   English
Short form of REGINALD.
REGGIE   m   English
Diminutive of REGINALD.
REGINALD   m   English
From Reginaldus, a Latinized form of REYNOLD.
REID   m   English
From a surname which is a Scots variant of REED.
REILLY   m & f   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from the given name Raghailleach, meaning unknown.
RENE   m & f   English
English form of RENÉ or RENÉE.
REUBEN   m   Biblical, Hebrew, English
Means "behold, a son" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the eldest son of Jacob and Leah and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel... [more]
REX   m   English
From Latin rex "king". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
REYNARD   m   English (Rare)
From the Germanic name Raginhard, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and hard "brave, hardy"... [more]
REYNOLD   m   English
From the Germanic name Raginald, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and wald "rule"... [more]
RHETT   m   English
From a surname, an Anglicized form of the Dutch de Raedt, derived from raet "advice, counsel". Margaret Mitchell used this name for the character Rhett Butler in her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936).
RIAN   m   English
Variant of RYAN.
RICH   m   English
Short form of RICHARD.
RICHARD   m   English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy"... [more]
RICHIE   m   English
Diminutive of RICHARD.
RICK   m   English
Short form of RICHARD or names ending in rick.
RICKEY   m   English
Diminutive of RICHARD.
RICKI   m & f   English
Masculine and feminine diminutive of RICHARD.
RICKIE   m   English
Diminutive of RICHARD.
RICKY   m   English
Diminutive of RICHARD.
RIDLEY   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "reed clearing" or "cleared wood" in Old English.
RIGBY   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "ridge farm" in Old Norse.
RILEY   m & f   English
From a surname which comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.
RIPLEY   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which originally came from a place name that meant "strip clearing" in Old English.
RITCHIE   m   English
Variant of RICHIE.
RIVER   m   English (Modern)
From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".
ROB   m   English, Dutch
Short form of ROBERT.
ROBBIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of ROBERT or ROBERTA.
ROBBY   m   English
Diminutive of ROBERT.
ROBERT   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright"... [more]
ROBIN   m & f   English, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor... [more]
ROCKY   m   English
Diminutive of ROCCO or other names beginning with a similar sound, or else a nickname referring to a tough person. This is the name of a boxer played by Sylvester Stallone in the movie 'Rocky' (1976) and its five sequels.
ROD   m   English
Short form of RODERICK or RODNEY.
RODDY   m   English, Scottish
Diminutive of RODERICK or RODNEY.
RODERICK   m   English, Scottish, Welsh
Means "famous power" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ric "power"... [more]
RODGE   m   English
Short form of RODGER.
RODGER   m   English
Variant of ROGER.
RODNEY   m   English
From a surname, originally derived from a place name, which meant "Hroda's island" in Old English (where Hroda is a Germanic given name meaning "fame")... [more]
ROGER   m   English, French, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear"... [more]
ROLAND   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Medieval French
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and land meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave"... [more]
ROLF   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
From the Germanic name Hrolf (or its Old Norse cognate Hrólfr), a contracted form of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF)... [more]
ROLLAND   m   English
Variant of ROLAND.
ROLLO   m   English
Latinized form of Roul, the Old French form of ROLF. Rollo (or Rolf) the Ganger was an exiled Viking who, in the 10th century, became the first Duke of Normandy... [more]
ROLO   m   English (Rare)
Variant of ROLLO.
ROLPH   m   English (Rare)
Variant of ROLF.
ROLY   m   English
Diminutive of ROLAND.
RON (1)   m   English
Short form of RONALD.
RONALD   m   Scottish, English
Scottish form of RAGNVALDR, a name introduced to Scotland by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. It became popular outside Scotland during the 20th century... [more]
RONNIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of RONALD or VERONICA.
RONNY   m   English
Diminutive of RONALD.
ROOSEVELT   m   English
From a Dutch surname meaning "rose field". This name is often given in honour of American presidents Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) or Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945).
ROSCOE   m   English
From an English surname, originally derived from a place name, which meant "doe wood" in Old Norse.
ROSS   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish and English surname which originally indicated a person from a place called Ross (such as the region of Ross in northern Scotland), derived from Gaelic ros meaning "promontory, headland"... [more]
ROSWELL   m   English
From a surname which was derived from an Old English place name meaning "horse spring".
ROWAN   m & f   Irish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
ROWLAND   m   English
Medieval variant of ROLAND.
ROWLEY   m   English
Variant of ROLY.
ROY   m   Scottish, English, Dutch
Anglicized form of RUADH. A notable bearer was the Scottish outlaw and folk hero Rob Roy (1671-1734). It is often associated with French roi "king".
ROYAL   m   English
From the English word royal, derived (via Old French) from Latin regalis, a derivative of rex "king". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century.
ROYALE   m   English (Rare)
Variant of ROYAL.
ROYCE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the medieval given name Royse, a variant of ROSE.
ROYDON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "rye hill", from Old English ryge "rye" and dun "hill".
ROYLE   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "rye hill" from Old English ryge "rye" and hyll "hill".
ROYSTON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "town of Royse". The given name Royse was a medieval variant of ROSE.
RUBE   m   English
Short form of REUBEN.
RUDOLPH   m   English
English form of RUDOLF, imported from Germany in the 19th century. Robert L. May used it in 1939 for his Christmas character Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.
RUDY   m   English
Diminutive of RUDOLF.
RUDYARD   m   English (Rare)
From a place name meaning "red yard" in Old English. This name was borne by Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936), the author of 'The Jungle Book' and other works, who was named after Rudyard Lake in Staffordshire.
RUFUS   m   Ancient Roman, English, Biblical
Roman cognomen which meant "red-haired" in Latin. Several early saints had this name, including one mentioned in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament... [more]
RUPERT   m   German, Dutch, English, Polish
German variant form of ROBERT. The military commander Prince Rupert of the Rhine, a nephew of Charles I, introduced this name to England in the 17th century.
RUSS   m   English
Short form of RUSSELL.
RUSSEL   m   English
Variant of RUSSELL.
RUSSELL   m   English
From a surname which meant "little red one" in French. A notable bearer of the surname was the agnostic British philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), who wrote on many subjects including logic, epistemology and mathematics... [more]
RUSTY   m   English
From a nickname which was originally given to someone with a rusty, or reddish-brown, hair colour.
RYAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendant of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).
RYDER   m   English (Modern)
From an English occupational surname derived from Old English ridere meaning "mounted warrior" or "messenger".
RYKER   m   English (Modern)
Possibly a variant of the German surname Riker, a derivative of Low German rike "rich". It may have been altered by association with the popular name prefix Ry.
RYLAN   m   English (Modern)
Possibly a variant of the English surname Ryland, which was originally derived from a place name meaning "rye land" in Old English.
RYLEY   m   English (Modern)
Variant of RILEY.
SACHEVERELL   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a Norman place name. It was occasionally given in honour of preacher Henry Sacheverell (1674-1724).
SACHIE   m   English (Rare)
Diminutive of SACHEVERELL.
SAGE   f & m   English (Modern)
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
SAL   f & m   English
Short form of SALLY, SALVADOR, and other names beginning with Sal.
SAM (1)   m & f   English
Short form of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.
SAMMIE   f & m   English
Diminutive of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.
SAMMY   m & f   English
Diminutive of SAMUEL, SAMSON or SAMANTHA.
SAMPSON (2)   m   English
From an English surname which was itself derived from a medieval form of the given name SAMSON.
SAMSON   m   Biblical, English, French, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name שִׁמְשׁוֹן (Shimshon) which meant "sun"... [more]
SAMUEL   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name שְׁמוּאֵל (Shemu'el) which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard"... [more]
SANDFORD   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of SANFORD.
SANDY   m & f   English
Originally a diminutive of ALEXANDER. As a feminine name it is a diminutive of ALEXANDRA or SANDRA... [more]
SANFORD   m   English
From an English surname, originally from a place name, which meant "sand ford" in Old English.
SASHA   m & f   Russian, Ukrainian, English, French
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of ALEKSANDR or ALEKSANDRA.
SATCHEL   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname derived from Old English sacc meaning "sack, bag", referring to a person who was a bag maker.
SAWYER   m   English (Modern)
From a surname meaning "sawer of wood" in Middle English. Mark Twain used it for the hero in his novel 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876).
SAXON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the name of the Germanic tribe the Saxons, ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife". This name can also be given in direct reference to the tribe.
SCHUYLER   m   English
From a Dutch surname meaning "scholar". Dutch settlers brought the surname to America, where it was subsequently adopted as a given name in honour of the American general and senator Philip Schuyler (1733-1804).
SCOT   m   English, Scottish
Variant form of SCOTT.
SCOTT   m   English, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname which referred to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic. It is derived from Latin Scoti meaning "Gaelic speaker", with the ultimate origin uncertain.
SCOTTIE   m   English, Scottish
Diminutive of SCOTT.
SCOTTY   m   English, Scottish
Diminutive of SCOTT.
SEAN   m   Irish, English
Anglicized form of SEÁN.
SEBASTIAN   m   German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian
From the Latin name Sebastianus which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors)... [more]
SEFTON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "town in the rushes" in Old English.
SELBY   m & f   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "willow farm" in Old Norse.
SELWYN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from an Old English given name, which was formed of the elements sele "manor" and wine "friend".
SEPTEMBER   f & m   English (Rare)
From the name of the ninth month (though it means "seventh month" in Latin, since it was originally the seventh month of the Roman year), which is sometimes used as a given name for someone born in September.
SEQUOIA   f & m   English (Rare)
From the name of huge trees that grow in California. The tree got its name from the Cherokee scholar Sequoya (also known as George Guess), the inventor of the Cherokee alphabet.
SETH (1)   m   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve... [more]
SEWARD   m   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Old English given name SIGEWEARD.
SEYMOUR   m   English
From a Norman surname which originally belonged to a person coming from the French town of Saint Maur (which means "Saint MAURUS").
SHAD (2)   m   English
Perhaps a variant of CHAD.
SHANE   m   Irish, English
Anglicized form of SEÁN. It came into general use in America after the release of the western movie 'Shane' (1953).
SHANNON   f & m   English
From the name of the River Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, called Abha na tSionainn in Irish. It is associated with the goddess Sionann and is sometimes said to be named for her... [more]
SHANON   f & m   English
Variant of SHANNON.
SHAQUILLE   m   English (Modern)
Variant of SHAKIL. This name is borne by basketball player Shaquille O'Neal (1972-).
SHAUN   m   English
Anglicized form of SEÁN.
SHAW (1)   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from Old English sceaga meaning "thicket".
SHAWN   m   English
Anglicized form of SEÁN.
SHAYNE   m   English
Variant of SHANE.
SHEARD   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "gap between hills" in Old English.
SHEL   m   English
Short form of SHELDON.
SHELBY   m & f   English
From a surname, which was possibly a variant of SELBY. Though previously in use as a rare masculine name, it was popularized as a feminine name by the main character in the movie 'The Woman in Red' (1935)... [more]
SHELDON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "valley with steep sides" in Old English. Sheldon is the name of several locations in England.
SHELLEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "clearing on a bank" in Old English. Two famous bearers of the surname were Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822), a romantic poet whose works include 'Adonais' and 'Ozymandias', and Mary Shelley (1797-1851), his wife, the author of the horror story 'Frankenstein'... [more]
SHELLY   f & m   English
Variant of SHELLEY.
SHELTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "shelf town" in Old English.
SHERIDAN   m & f   English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Sirideáin meaning "descendant of Sirideán". The name Sirideán means "searcher" in Gaelic.
SHERMAN   m   English
From a surname meaning "shear man" in Old English, originally denoting a person who cut cloth. Famous bearers of the surname include American politician Roger Sherman (1721-1793) and American Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman (1820-1891).
SHERWOOD   m   English
From an English place name (or from a surname which was derived from it) meaning "bright forest". This was the name of the forest in which the legendary outlaw Robin Hood made his home.
SHIRLEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "bright clearing" in Old English. This is the name of the main character in Charlotte Brontë's semi-autobiographical novel 'Shirley' (1849)... [more]
SID   m   English
Short form of SIDNEY.
SIDNEY   m & f   English
From the English surname SIDNEY. It was first used as a given name in honour of executed politician Algernon Sidney (1622-1683)... [more]
SIGMUND   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and mund "protector" (or in the case of the Scandinavian cognate, from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and mundr "protector")... [more]
SILAS   m   English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament... [more]
SILVER   m   English
From the English word for the precious metal or the colour, ultimately derived from Old English seolfor.
SILVESTER   m   Dutch, English, Slovene, Slovak, German, Late Roman
From a Roman name meaning "of the forest" from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the name of three popes, including Saint Silvester I who supposedly baptized the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine the Great... [more]
SIMON   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) which meant "he has heard"... [more]
SINCLAIR   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a Norman French town called "Saint CLAIR". A notable bearer was the American author Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951).
SINJIN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of the name St. John (see JOHN).
SKYLAR   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of SKYLER.
SKYLER   m & f   English (Modern)
Variant of SCHUYLER. The spelling was modified due to association with the name Tyler and the English word sky.
SLADE   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which meant "valley" in Old English.
SLY   m   English
Short form of SYLVESTER. The actor Sylvester Stallone (1946-) is a well-known bearer of this nickname.
SMITH   m   English
From an English surname meaning "metal worker, blacksmith", derived from Old English smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world.
SOLOMON   m   Biblical, English, Jewish
From the Hebrew name שְׁלֹמֹה (Shelomoh) which was derived from Hebrew שָׁלוֹם (shalom) "peace"... [more]
SONNIE   m   English (Rare)
Variant of SONNY.
SONNY   m   English
From a nickname which is commonly used to denote a young boy, derived from the English word son.
SPARROW   m & f   English (Rare)
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English spearwa.
SPENCER   m   English
From a surname which meant "dispenser of provisions" in Middle English. A famous bearer was American actor Spencer Tracy (1900-1967). It was also the surname of Princess Diana (1961-1997).
SPIKE   m   English (Rare)
From a nickname which may have originally been given to a person with spiky hair.
STACEY   f & m   English
Variant of STACY.
STACY   f & m   English
Either a diminutive of ANASTASIA, or else from a surname which was derived from Stace, a medieval form of EUSTACE... [more]
STAFFORD   m   English
From a surname which was from a place name meaning "landing-place ford" in Old English.
STAN (1)   m   English
Short form of STANLEY. A famous bearer was British comedian Stan Laurel (1890-1965).
STANFORD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "stone ford" in Old English.
STANLEY   m   English
From a surname meaning "stone clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was the British-American explorer and journalist Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904), the man who found David Livingstone in Africa... [more]
STE   m   English
Short form of STEPHEN.
STEPH   f & m   English
Short form of STEPHEN or STEPHANIE.
STEPHEN   m   English, Biblical
From the Greek name Στεφανος (Stephanos) meaning "crown", more precisely "that which surrounds"... [more]
STERLING   m   English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning. The name can also be given in reference to the English word sterling meaning "excellent"... [more]
STEVE   m   English
Short form of STEVEN. A notable bearer was American technology entrepreneur Steve Jobs (1955-2011).
STEVEN   m   English, Dutch
Medieval English variant of STEPHEN, and a Dutch variant of STEFAN. The filmmaker Steven Spielberg (1946-), director of 'E.T.' and 'Indiana Jones', is a famous bearer of this name.
STEVIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of STEPHEN or STEPHANIE. A famous bearer is the American musician Stevie Wonder (1950-).
STEW   m   English
Short form of STEWART.
STEWART   m   English, Scottish
From a surname which was a variant STUART.
STIRLING   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant STERLING.
STORM   m & f   English (Modern)
From the English word storm, ultimately from Old English.
STU   m   English
Short form of STUART.
STUART   m   English, Scottish
From an occupational surname originally belonging to a person who was a steward. It is ultimately derived from Old English stig "house" and weard "guard"... [more]
SULLIVAN   m   English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Súilleabháin meaning "descendant of Súilleabhán". The name Súilleabhán means "little dark eye" in Irish.
SYD   m   English
Short form of SYDNEY.
SYDNEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was a variant of the surname SIDNEY. This is the name of the largest city in Australia, which was named for Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney in 1788... [more]


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