Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the usage is Anglo-Saxon.
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ÆLFGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ALGAR.
ÆLFHEAH   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and heah "high". This was the name of an 11th-century archbishop of Canterbury, a saint and martyr, who is commonly known as Alphege or Elphege.
ÆLFNOÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ælf "elf" combined with noð "boldness, daring".
ÆLFRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ALFRED.
ÆLFRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and ric "power, rule".
ÆLFSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and sige "victory".
ÆLFSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and stan "stone".
ÆLFWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and weard "guardian".
ÆLFWIG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wig "war, battle".
ÆLFWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wine "friend". This name was not commonly used after the Norman conquest.
ÆLRED   m   Anglo-Saxon
Contracted form of ÆÐELRÆD. This was the name of a 12th-century English saint.
ÆSC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "ash tree" in Old English. This was the nickname of a 5th-century king of Kent, whose birth name was Oeric.
ÆÐELBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Adalbert (see ALBERT). This was the name of a Saxon king of England and two kings of Kent, one of whom was a saint. It became unused after the Normans introduced their form of Adalbert after their invasion.
ÆÐELFRIÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and friþ "peace". The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ÆÐELMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and mær "famous". It is a cognate of ADELMAR.
ÆTHELNOÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and noð "boldness, daring".
ÆÐELRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and ræd "counsel". This was the name of two Saxon kings of England including Æðelræd II "the Unready" whose realm was overrun by the Danes in the early 11th century. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ÆÞELRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELRÆD.
ÆTHELRED   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELRÆD.
ÆÐELRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and ric "power, rule". This was the name of several early Anglo-Saxon kings.
ÆÐELSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and stan "stone". This was the name of an early king of England. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ÆTHELSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELSTAN.
ÆTHELWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element æðel "noble" combined with weard "guardian".
ÆÐELWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and wine "friend". This name became rare after the Norman conquest. Saint Æðelwine was a 7th-century bishop of Lindsey, England.
ÆTHELWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELWINE.
BADA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name probably derived from beadu meaning "battle".
BEORHTRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorht "bright" and ric "power, rule".
BEORHTSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorht "bright" and sige "victory".
BEORNRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorn "warrior, man" and ræd "counsel".
CEADDA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of CHAD.
CENHELM   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of KENELM.
CENRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cene "bold" and ric "power".
CEOLMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ceol "keel" and mund "protection".
CERDIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Earlier form of CEDRIC, possibly of Brythonic origin.
COLA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English byname meaning "charcoal", originally given to a person with dark features.
CUTHBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of CUTHBERT.
CYNEBALD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and beald "bold".
CYNEFRIÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "royal peace" from Old English cyne "royal" and friþ "peace".
CYNEHEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and heard "brave, hardy".
CYNEMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and mær "famous".
CYNERIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and ric "power".
CYNESIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and sige "victory".
CYNEWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and weard "guard".
DEORWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements deor "dear" and wine "friend".
DUDDA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English byname possibly meaning "round".
DUNSTAN   m   English (Rare), Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements dunn "dark" and stan "stone". This name was borne by a 10th-century saint, the archbishop of Canterbury. It was occasionally used in the Middle Ages, though it died out after the 16th century. It was revived by the Tractarian movement in the 19th century.
EADBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and beorht "bright". This was the name of an 8th-century king of Northumbria and three kings of Kent.
EADGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDGAR.
EADMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDMUND.
EADRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDRIC.
EADWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDWARD.
EADWIG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wig "war". This was the name of a Saxon king of England in the 10th century. The name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
EADWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDWIN.
EADWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wulf "wolf". This name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
EALDRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and ræd "counsel". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EALDWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EALHHERE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ealh "temple" and here "army".
EALHSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ealh "temple" combined with stan "stone".
EARDWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element eard "land" combined with wulf "wolf".
EASTMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ESMOND.
ECGBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EGBERT.
EOFORWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
GLÆDWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements glæd "bright" and wine "friend". This name was not actually recorded in the Old English era, though it is attested starting in the 11th century.
GODRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "power of god", derived from Old English god combined with ric "power, rule". This name died out a few centuries after the Norman conquest.
GODWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "friend of god", derived from Old English god combined with wine "friend". This was the name of the powerful 11th-century Earl of Wessex, the father of King Harold II of England.
HEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Short form of various Old English names containing the element heard meaning "brave, hardy".
HEREWARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements here "army" and weard "guard". This was the name of an 11th-century Anglo-Saxon leader who rebelled against Norman rule.
HEREWEALD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of HAROLD.
HILDRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Older form of HILDRED.
HROÐGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Hrodger (see ROGER). The name became unused after the Normans introduced Hrodger after their invasion. In the Old English poem 'Beowulf' this is the name of the Danish king.
HROÐULF   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF). This name appears in 'Beowulf' belonging to the nephew of Hroðgar.
LEOFDÆG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with dæg "day".
LEOFRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with ric "power".
LEOFSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and sige "victory".
LEOFSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with stan "stone".
LEOFWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "dear friend", derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and wine "friend". This was the name of an 8th-century English saint, also known as Lebuin, who did missionary work in Frisia.
OSBEORN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSBORN.
OSBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSBERT.
OSGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and gar "spear".
OSMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSMOND.
OSWALD   m   English, German, Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler". Saint Oswald was a king of Northumbria who introduced Christianity to northeast England in the 7th century before being killed in battle. There was also an Old Norse cognate Ásvaldr in use in England, being borne by the 10th-century Saint Oswald of Worcester, who was of Danish ancestry. Though the name had died out by the end of the Middle Ages, it was revived in the 19th century.
OSWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSWIN.
PÆGA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name of unknown meaning.
SÆWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements "sea" and wine "friend".
SIGEBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "bright victory", derived from Old English sige "victory" and beorht "bright". This was the name of a king of Wessex. The name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
SIGEWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements sige "victory" and weard "guard, guardian".
SWIÐHUN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of SWITHIN.
TATA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name of unknown meaning.
WEALDMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements weald "power, leader, ruler" and mær "famous".
WEALHMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wealh "foreigner, Celt" and mær "famous".
WEMBA   m   Anglo-Saxon (Rare)
Byname derived from Old English wamb meaning "belly".
WIGBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon, Ancient Germanic
Old English form of WYBERT. This is also a continental Germanic cognate.
WIGHEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYOT.
WIGMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYMOND.
WIGSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYSTAN.
WILFRIÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WILFRED.
WILHEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of WILLIHARD.
WILMǢR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of WILLAMAR.
WINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English wine "friend".
WINFRIÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WINFRED.
WULFNOÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and noð "boldness, daring". This name became rare after the Norman Conquest.
WULFRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ULRIC.
WULFSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and sige "victory".
WULFSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and stan "stone".
WYNNSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wynn "joy" and stan "stone".
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