Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the usage is Czech.
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ADAMmEnglish, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Catalan, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
ADOLFmGerman, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalwolf, which meant "noble wolf" from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and wulf. It was borne by several Swedish kings as a first or second name, most notably by Gustav II Adolf in the 17th century. Association with Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), the leader of the Nazi party in Germany during World War II, has lessened the use of this name.
ALEXANDRmCzech
Czech form of ALEXANDER.
ALEXEJmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of ALEXIS.
ALOISmGerman, Czech
German and Czech form of ALOYSIUS.
AMBROŽmSlovene, Czech (Rare)
Slovene and Czech form of Ambrosius (see AMBROSE).
ANDĚLmCzech
Czech form of ANGEL.
ANTONÍNmCzech
Czech form of Antoninus (see ANTONINO). A famous bearer was the Czech composer Antonín Dvořák (1841-1904).
ARNOŠTmCzech, Sorbian
Czech and Sorbian form of ERNEST.
AUGUSTÍNmSlovak, Czech
Slovak and Czech form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AURELmGerman, Romanian, Czech, Slovak
German, Romanian, Czech and Slovak form of AURELIUS.
BEDŘICHmCzech
Czech form of FREDERICK.
BENEDIKTmGerman, Russian, Icelandic, Czech
Form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT).
BENJAMÍNmSpanish, Czech, Slovak, Icelandic
Spanish, Czech, Slovak and Icelandic form of BENJAMIN.
BERNARDmEnglish, French, Dutch, Polish, Croatian, Slovene, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element bern "bear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Beornheard. This was the name of several saints, including Saint Bernard of Menthon who built hospices in the Swiss Alps in the 10th century, and Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, a 12th-century theologian and Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include the Irish playwright and essayist George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) and the British World War II field marshal Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976).
BLAŽEJmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of BLAISE.
BOHDANmCzech, Ukrainian
Czech and Ukrainian form of BOGDAN.
BOHUMILmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of BOGUMIŁ.
BOHUMÍRmCzech, Slovak
Derived from the Slavic element bogu "god" combined with meru "great, famous" or miru "peace, world".
BOHUSLAVmCzech, Slovak, Ukrainian
Czech, Slovak and Ukrainian form of BOGUSŁAW.
BOLESLAVmCzech, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Czech and Russian form of BOLESŁAW.
BONIFÁCmCzech (Rare), Hungarian (Rare)
Czech and Hungarian form of Bonifatius (see BONIFACE).
BOŘIVOJmCzech
Derived from the Slavic elements borti "battle" and voji "soldier". This name was borne by a 9th-century duke of Bohemia.
CENEKmCzech
Diminutive of VINCENC.
CTIBORmCzech
Czech form of CZCIBOR.
CTIRADmCzech, Slovak
Derived from the Slavic elements chisti meaning "honour" and rad meaning "happy, willing". In Czech legend this was the name of one of the men tricked by Šárka.
CYRILmEnglish, French, Czech, Slovak
From the Greek name Κυριλλος (Kyrillos) which was derived from Greek κυριος (kyrios) meaning "lord", a word used frequently in the Greek Bible to refer to God or Jesus.... [more]
DALIBORmCzech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dali meaning "distance" and borti meaning "to fight".
DALIMILmCzech, Slovak
Derived from the Slavic elements dali meaning "distance" and milu meaning "gracious, dear".
DANIELmEnglish, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge", from the roots דִּין (din) meaning "to judge" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.... [more]
DAVIDmEnglish, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DENISmFrench, Russian, English, German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Romanian, Croatian
From Denys or Denis, the medieval French forms of DIONYSIUS. Saint Denis was a 3rd-century missionary to Gaul and the first bishop of Paris. He was martyred by decapitation, after which legend says he picked up his own severed head and walked for a distance while preaching a sermon. He is credited with converting the Gauls to Christianity and is considered the patron saint of France.... [more]
DOBROMILmCzech (Rare), Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dobru "good" and milu "gracious, dear".
DOBROSLAVmCroatian, Serbian, Czech, Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dobru "good" and slava "glory".
DRAHOMÍRmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of DRAGOMIR.
DRAHOSLAVmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of DRAGOSLAV.
DUŠANmCzech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovak, Slovene, Macedonian
Derived from Slavic dusha meaning "soul, spirit".
EMILmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Hungarian, Icelandic, English
From the Roman family name Aemilius, which was derived from Latin aemulus meaning "rival".
ERIKmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Scandinavian form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
EUGENmGerman, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Croatian
Form of Eugenius (see EUGENE).
EVŽENmCzech
Czech form of EUGENE.
FERDINANDmGerman, French, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
FRANTIŠEKmCzech
Czech form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
GABRIELmFrench, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) meaning "strong man, hero" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Gabriel is an archangel in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.... [more]
HAVELmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of GALLUS.
HONZAmCzech
Czech form of HANS.
HORYMÍRmCzech (Rare)
Possibly from the Slavic elements gora meaning "mountain" and miru meaning "peace, world".
HYNEKmCzech
Diminutive of HEINRICH.
IGNÁCmHungarian, Czech, Slovak
Hungarian, Czech and Slovak form of IGNATIUS.
IVANmRussian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote 'Fathers and Sons', and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
IVO (1)mGerman, Dutch, Italian, Portuguese, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element iv meaning "yew". Alternative theories suggest that it may in fact be derived from a cognate Celtic element. This was the name of several saints (who are also commonly known as Saint Yves or Ives).
JÁCHYMmCzech
Czech form of JOACHIM.
JAKUBmPolish, Czech, Slovak
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of JACOB (or JAMES).
JAN (1)mDutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Polish, Slovene, German, Catalan, Sorbian
Form of JOHANNES. This name was borne by the 15th-century Flemish painter Jan van Eyck and the 17th-century Dutch painter Jan Vermeer.
JANEKmPolish, Czech
Polish and Czech diminutive of JAN (1).
JAREKmPolish, Czech
Diminutive of Slavic names beginning with the element yaru meaning "fierce, strong", such as JAROSŁAW or JAROSLAV.
JARMILmCzech
Derived from the Slavic elements yaru meaning "fierce, energetic" and milu meaning "gracious, dear".
JAROMÍRmCzech
Derived from the Slavic elements yaru meaning "fierce, energetic" and miru meaning "peace, world".
JAROSLAVmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of JAROSŁAW.
JINDŘICHmCzech
Czech form of HENRY.
JIŘÍmCzech
Czech form of GEORGE.
JONÁŠmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of JONAH.
JOSEFmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech
German, Scandinavian and Czech form of JOSEPH.
KAJETÁNmCzech (Rare), Slovak (Rare), Hungarian (Rare)
Czech, Slovak and Hungarian form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
KAMIL (2)mCzech, Slovak, Polish
Czech, Slovak and Polish form of CAMILLUS.
KARELmDutch, Czech, Slovene
Dutch, Czech and Slovene form of CHARLES.
KAZIMÍRmCzech (Rare), Slovak (Rare), Hungarian (Rare)
Czech, Slovak and Hungarian form of CASIMIR.
KLEMENTmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of Clemens (see CLEMENT).
KONRÁDmHungarian, Czech, Slovak
Hungarian, Czech and Slovak form of CONRAD.
KORNELmPolish, Czech, Slovak
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of CORNELIUS.
KRYŠTOFmCzech
Czech form of CHRISTOPHER.
LADISLAVmCzech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian
Czech, Slovak, Slovene and Croatian form of VLADISLAV.
LEOŠmCzech
Czech form of LEO.
LIBORmCzech
Czech form of LIBERIUS.
LUBOMÍRmCzech
Derived from the Slavic elements lyuby "love" and miru "peace, world".
LUBOŠmCzech
Short form of LUBOMÍR and other names beginning with the Slavic element lyuby meaning "love".
LUDĚKmCzech
Diminutive of LUDVÍK and other names beginning with Lud.
LUDVÍKmCzech
Czech form of LUDWIG.
LUKÁŠmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of LUKE.
MARCELmFrench, Catalan, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, German
Form of MARCELLUS. A notable bearer was the French author Marcel Proust (1871-1922).
MAREKmPolish, Czech, Slovak
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of MARK.
MARIÁNmSlovak, Czech, Hungarian
Slovak, Czech and Hungarian form of MARIANUS.
MARIAN (2)mPolish, Czech, Romanian
Polish, Czech and Romanian form of MARIANUS. It is sometimes used as a masculine form of MARIA.
MARIEf & mFrench, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French and Czech form of MARIA. A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.... [more]
MARTINmEnglish, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
MATĚJmCzech
Czech form of MATTHIAS, used to refer to the apostle chosen to replace Judas Iscariot.
MATOUŠmCzech
Czech form of MATTHEW, used to refer to the evangelist and apostle also known as Levi.
MATYÁŠmCzech
Czech form of MATTHIAS (via Hungarian Mátyás).
MAXMILIÁNmCzech
Czech form of Maximilianus (see MAXIMILIAN).
METODĚJmCzech
Czech form of METHODIUS.
MICHAELmEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.... [more]
MICHAL (1)mCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of MICHAEL.
MIKOLÁŠmCzech
Czech form of NICHOLAS.
MIKULÁŠmSlovak, Czech
Slovak and Czech form of NICHOLAS.
MILANmCzech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear", originally a short form of names that began with that element. A city in Italy bears this name, though it originates from a different source.
MILOŠmCzech, Slovak, Serbian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of names beginning with the Slavic element milu "gracious, dear". This was the name of a 14th-century Serbian hero who apparently killed the Ottoman sultan Murad I at the Battle of Kosovo.
MILOSLAVmCzech, Slovak, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements milu "gracious, dear" and slava "glory".
MIREKmCzech, Slovak, Polish
Diminutive of MIROSLAV and other names beginning with the Slavic element miru meaning "peace" or "world".
MIROSLAVmCzech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements miru "peace, world" and slava "glory". This was the name of a 10th-century king of Croatia who was deposed by one of his nobles after ruling for four years.
MSTISLAVmCzech, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Means "vengeance and glory" from the Slavic elements misti "vengeance" and slava "glory".
OLDŘICHmCzech
Czech form of ULRICH.
OLIVERmEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
ONDŘEJmCzech
Czech form of ANDREW.
OTAKARmCzech
Czech form of ODOVACAR. This was the name of two kings of Bohemia.
OTMARmGerman, Czech (Rare), Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Audamar, which was derived from the elements aud "wealth, fortune" and mari "famous". This was the name of an 8th-century Swiss saint, an abbot of Saint Gall.
OTOKARmCzech
Czech form of ODOVACAR.
PATRIKmSwedish, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Hungarian
Form of Patricius (see PATRICK).
PAVELmRussian, Czech, Bulgarian, Slovene, Macedonian
Russian, Czech, Bulgarian, Slovene and Macedonian form of PAUL.
PÉŤAm & fCzech
Diminutive of PETR or PETRA.
PEŤAm & fCzech
Diminutive of PETR or PETRA.
PETRmCzech
Czech form of PETER.
PETŘÍKmCzech
Diminutive of PETR.
PŘEMEKmCzech
Diminutive of PŘEMYSL.
PŘEMYSLmCzech
From an old Slavic name which meant "trick, stratagem", from pre "over" and mysli "thought, idea". This was the name of the founder of the Přemyslid dynasty, which ruled Bohemia from the 9th to the 14th century.
RADEKmCzech, Polish
Diminutive of Slavic names beginning with rad meaning "happy, willing".
RADIMmCzech
Short form of RADOMIR.
RADKOmBulgarian, Czech
Diminutive of Slavic names beginning with the element rad "happy, willing".
RADOMILmCzech, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements rad "happy, willing" and milu "gracious, dear".
RADOMÍRmCzech
Czech form of RADOMIR.
RADOŠmCzech
Short form of RADOSLAV, RADOMIR, and other names beginning with the Slavic element rad meaning "happy, willing".
RADOVANmSlovak, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element rad "happy, willing" combined with another element of unknown meaning.
RADÚZmCzech (Rare)
Derived from the Czech word rád "happy, glad". The Czech author Julius Zeyer probably created it for a character in his play 'Radúz and Mahulena' (1898).
ŘEHOŘmCzech
Czech form of GREGORY.
RENÉmFrench, German, Spanish, Slovak, Czech
French form of RENATUS. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and rationalist philosopher René Descartes (1596-1650).
RICHARDmEnglish, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.... [more]
ROBERTmEnglish, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.... [more]
ROMANmRussian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German
From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".
ROSTISLAVmRussian, Czech, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements rasti "growth" and slava "glory".
RUDOLFmGerman, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Russian, Armenian
From the Germanic name Hrodulf, which was derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wulf "wolf". It was borne by three kings of Burgundy, as well as several Habsburg rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria. Anthony Hope used this name for the hero in his popular novel 'The Prisoner of Zenda' (1894).
SAMUELmEnglish, French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name שְׁמוּאֵל (Shemu'el) which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard". As told in the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament, Samuel was the last of the ruling judges. He led the Israelites during a period of domination by the Philistines, who were ultimately defeated in battle at Mizpah. Later he anointed Saul to be the first king of Israel, and even later anointed his successor David.... [more]
SILVESTRmCzech
Czech form of SILVESTER.
ŠIMONmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of SIMON (1).
SLAVOMÍRmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of SŁAWOMIR.
STANISLAVmCzech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements stani meaning "stand, become" combined with slava meaning "glory".
ŠTĚPÁNmCzech
Czech form of STEPHEN.
SVATOPLUKmCzech
Czech form of SVYATOPOLK.
TADEÁŠmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of THADDEUS.
THEODORmGerman, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Romanian
German form of THEODORE, as well as a Scandinavian, Czech and Romanian variant of TEODOR. A famous bearer was American children's book creator Theodor Seuss Geisel (1904-1991), better known as Dr. Seuss.
TIBORmHungarian, Czech, Slovak
Hungarian, Czech and Slovak form of Tiburtius (see TIBURCIO).
TOMÁŠmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of THOMAS.
VÁCLAVmCzech, Slovak
Contracted form of the older name Veceslav, from the Slavic elements veche "more" and slava "glory". Saint Václav (known as Wenceslas in English) was a 10th-century duke of Bohemia murdered by his brother. He is the patron saint of the Czech Republic. This was also the name of several Bohemian kings.
VAŠEKmCzech
Diminutive of VÁCLAV.
VAVŘINECmCzech
Czech form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
VĚNCESLAVmCzech (Rare)
Czech variant of VÁCLAV, via the Latinized form Venceslaus.
VENDELÍNmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of WENDELIN.
VILÉMmCzech
Czech form of WILLIAM.
VINCENCmCzech, Slovene
Czech and Slovene form of VINCENT.
VÍTmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of VITUS or WIDO.
VLADANmSerbian, Czech, Slovak
Short form of Slavic names beginning with the element vladeti meaning "rule".
VLADIMÍRmCzech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak form of VLADIMIR.
VLADISLAVmRussian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vladeti "rule" and slava "glory".
VLASTIMILmCzech
Derived from the Slavic elements vlasti "rule, sovereignty" and milu "gracious, dear". In modern Czech vlast means "homeland" (a descendant word of vlasti).
VLASTIMÍRmCzech
Czech form of VLASTIMIR.
VLASTISLAVmCzech, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vlasti "rule, sovereignty" and slava "glory". In modern Czech vlast means "homeland" (a descendant word of vlasti).
VOJTĚCHmCzech
Czech form of WOJCIECH.
VRATISLAVmCzech, Slovak, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vratiti "to return" and slava "glory". This was the name of two dukes of Bohemia. The city of Wrocław in Poland is named after the first.
ZÁVIŠmCzech
Derived from a Slavic root meaning "envy".
ZBYNĚKmCzech
Diminutive of ZBYGNĚV, now used independently.
ZDENĚKmCzech
Czech form of ZDENKO.
ZIKMUNDmCzech
Czech form of SIGMUND.
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