Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the usage is German.
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ABRAHAM   m   English, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) "many, multitude". The biblical patriarch Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5). With his father Terah, he led his wife Sarah, his nephew Lot and their other followers from Ur into Canaan. He is regarded by Jews as being the founder of the Hebrews through his son Isaac and by Muslims as being the founder of the Arabs through his son Ishmael.... [more]
ACHIM (1)   m   German
German short form of JOACHIM.
ADALBERT   m   Ancient Germanic, German, Polish
Old Germanic form of ALBERT. This is the name of a patron saint of Bohemia, Poland and Prussia.
ADAM   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
ADELBERT   m   German, Dutch
German and Dutch variant of ADALBERT.
ADOLF   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalwolf, which meant "noble wolf" from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and wulf. It was borne by several Swedish kings as a first or second name, most notably by Gustav II Adolf in the 17th century. Association with Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), the leader of the Nazi party in Germany during World War II, has lessened the use of this name.
ADRIAN   m   English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian
Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN). Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.
ALBAN   m   German, French, Albanian, English (Rare)
From the Roman cognomen Albanus which meant "from Alba". Alba (from Latin albus "white") was the name of various places within the Roman Empire, including the city Alba Longa. This name was borne by Saint Alban, the first British martyr (4th century). According to tradition, he sheltered a fugitive priest in his house. When his house was searched, he disguised himself as the priest, was arrested in his stead, and was beheaded. As an English name, Alban was occasionally used in the Middle Ages and was revived in the 18th century, though it is now uncommon.
ALBERT   m   English, French, Catalan, German, Polish, Russian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Romanian, Hungarian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Adalbert, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and beraht "bright". This name was common among medieval German royalty. The Normans introduced it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Æðelberht. Though it became rare in England by the 17th century, it was repopularized in the 19th century by the German-born Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.... [more]
ALBRECHT   m   German
German cognate of ALBERT.
ALEX   m & f   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALEXANDER   m   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.... [more]
ALEXIS   m & f   German, French, English, Greek, Ancient Greek
From the Greek name Αλεξις (Alexis), which meant "helper" or "defender", derived from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, to help". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek comic poet, and also of several saints. It is used somewhat interchangeably with the related name Αλεξιος or Alexius, borne by five Byzantine emperors. In the English-speaking world it is more commonly used as a feminine name.
ALFONS   m   German, Dutch, Polish, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Polish form of ALFONSO.
ALFRED   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
ALOIS   m   German, Czech
German and Czech form of ALOYSIUS.
ALWIN   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From either of the two Germanic names ALFWIN or ADALWIN.
AMAND   m   German
German form of AMANDUS.
ANDREAS   m   German, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Welsh, Ancient Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Ancient Greek and Latin form of ANDREW. It is also the form used in modern Greek, German and Welsh.
ANSELM   m   German, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and helm "helmet, protection". This name was brought to England in the late 11th century by Saint Anselm, who was born in northern Italy. He was archbishop of Canterbury and a Doctor of the Church.
ANSGAR   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and ger "spear". Saint Ansgar was a 9th-century missionary who tried to convert the Danes and Norwegians.
AREND   m   Dutch, German
Dutch and German variant of ARNOLD. This is also the Dutch word for "eagle".
ARMIN   m   German
Modern form of ARMINIUS.
ARNDT   m   German
German short form of ARNOLD.
ARNE (2)   m   German
Diminutive of ARNOLD.
ARNFRIED   m   German
From a Germanic name derived from the elements arn "eagle" and frid "peace".
ARNO   m   Dutch, German
Short form of ARNOUD or ARNOLD.
ARNOLD   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "eagle power", derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wald "power". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Earnweald. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
ARNULF   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wulf "wolf".
ARTHUR   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.... [more]
AUGUST   m   German, Polish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Catalan, English
German, Polish, Scandinavian and Catalan form of AUGUSTUS.
AUGUSTIN   m   French, Czech, Romanian, Croatian, German
Form of Augustinus (see AUGUSTINE (1)).
AUREL   m   German, Romanian, Czech, Slovak
German, Romanian, Czech and Slovak form of AURELIUS.
AXEL   m   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German
Medieval Danish form of ABSALOM.
BALDUR   m   German, Icelandic
German and Icelandic form of BALDER.
BAPTIST   m   German
German form of BAPTISTE. It is often paired with the name Johann, in honour of Saint John the Baptist.
BARNABAS   m   German, English (Rare), Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of an Aramaic name. In Acts in the New Testament the byname Barnabas was given to a man named Joseph, a Jew from Cyprus who was a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys. The original Aramaic form is unattested, but it may be from בּר נביא (bar naviya') meaning "son of the prophet", though in Acts 4:36 it is claimed that the name means "son of encouragement". As an English name, it came into occasional use after the 12th century.
BARTHOLOMÄUS   m   German
German form of BARTHOLOMEW.
BASTIAN   m   German
Short form of SEBASTIAN.
BEAT   m   German (Swiss)
Swiss German form of BEATUS.
BEN (1)   m   English, German, Dutch
Short form of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT. A notable bearer was Ben Jonson (1572-1637), an English poet and playwright.
BENEDIKT   m   German, Russian, Icelandic, Czech
Form of Benedictus (see BENEDICT).
BENJAMIN   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).... [more]
BENNO   m   German
Short form of German names containing the element bern "bear".
BERND   m   German
Short form of BERNHARD.
BERNHARD   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of BERNARD.
BERT   m   English, German, Dutch
Short form of ALBERT and other names containing the element bert, often derived from the Germanic element beraht meaning "bright".
BERTHOLD   m   German (Archaic)
Means "bright ruler" from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with wald "rule".
BERTRAM   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright raven", derived from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with hramn "raven". The Normans introduced this name to England. Shakespeare used it in his play 'All's Well That Ends Well' (1603).
BJÖRN   m   Swedish, Icelandic, German, Ancient Scandinavian
From an Old Norse byname meaning "bear".
BONIFAZ   m   German
German form of Bonifatius (see BONIFACE).
BORIS   m   Bulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian, German, History
From the Turkic name Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century king Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his country to Christianity, as well as two later Bulgarian emperors. The name was popularized in the Slavic world due to the 11th-century Saint Boris, who was a Russian prince martyred with his brother Gleb. His mother may have been Bulgarian. Another famous bearer was the 16th-century Russian emperor Boris Godunov, later the subject of a play of that name by Aleksandr Pushkin.
BRUNO   m   German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.
BURKHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements burg meaning "protection" and hard "brave, hardy". Saint Burkhard was a bishop who founded several monasteries in Germany in the 8th century.
CARL   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
German form of CHARLES. Two noteworthy bearers of the name were the German mathematician Carl Gauss (1777-1855), who made contributions to number theory and algebra as well as physics and astronomy, and the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (1875-1961), who founded analytical psychology. It was imported to America in the 19th century by German immigrants.
CARSTEN   m   Low German, Danish
Variant of KARSTEN.
CHRISTIAN   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the medieval Latin name Christianus meaning "a Christian" (see CHRISTOS). In England it has been in use since the Middle Ages, during which time it was used by both males and females, but it did not become common until the 17th century. In Denmark the name has been borne by ten kings since the 15th century. A famous bearer was Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), the Danish author of such fairy tales as 'The Ugly Duckling' and 'The Emperor's New Clothes'.
CHRISTOPH   m   German
German form of CHRISTOPHER.
CLAUS   m   German, Danish
German short form of NICHOLAS.
CLEMENS   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Original Latin form of CLEMENT, as well as the German, Dutch and Scandinavian form.
CONRAD   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements kuoni "brave" and rad "counsel". This was the name of a 10th-century saint and bishop of Konstanz, in southern Germany. It was also borne by several medieval German kings and dukes. In England it was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has only been common since the 19th century when it was reintroduced from Germany.
CORBINIAN   m   German
Variant of KORBINIAN.
CORD   m   German
German contracted form of CONRAD.
CORNELIUS   m   Ancient Roman, English, Dutch, German, Biblical
Roman family name which possibly derives from the Latin element cornu "horn". In Acts in the New Testament Cornelius is a centurion who is directed by an angel to seek Peter. After speaking with Peter he converts to Christianity, and he is traditionally deemed the first gentile convert. The name was also borne by a few early saints, including a 3rd-century pope. In England it came into use in the 16th century, partly due to Dutch influence.
DANIEL   m   English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Croatian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.... [more]
DAVID   m   English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DENIS   m   French, Russian, English, German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Romanian, Croatian
From Denys or Denis, the medieval French forms of DIONYSIUS. Saint Denis was a 3rd-century missionary to Gaul and the first bishop of Paris. He was martyred by decapitation, after which legend says he picked up his own severed head and walked for a distance while preaching a sermon. He is credited with converting the Gauls to Christianity and is considered the patron saint of France.... [more]
DENNIS   m   English, German, Dutch
Usual English, German and Dutch form of DENIS.
DETLEF   m   Low German, German
Derived from the Germanic elements theud "people" and leib "heritage".
DETLEV   m   Low German, German
Variant of DETLEF.
DIDI   m   German
Diminutive of DIETER.
DIEDERICH   m   German (Archaic)
Older German form of DIETRICH.
DIERK   m   German
Variant of DIRK.
DIETER   m   German
Means "warrior of the people", derived from the Germanic elements theud "people" and hari "army".
DIETFRIED   m   German
Means "peace of the people" from the Germanic elements theud "people" and frid "peace".
DIETHELM   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements theud "people" and helm "helmet, protection".
DIETMAR   m   German
Means "famous people", derived from the Germanic elements theud "people" and meri "famous".
DIETRICH   m   German
German form of THEODORIC.
DIRK   m   Dutch, German, English
Short form of DIEDERIK. The name was popularized in the English-speaking world by actor Dirk Bogarde (1921-1999), who had some Dutch ancestry. This is also the Scots word for a type of dagger.
EBBE   m   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, German (Rare)
Diminutive of EBERHARD and other names beginning with the Germanic element ebur meaning "wild boar". In Scandinavia it is also a diminutive of ESBEN.
EBERHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of EVERARD. This name was borne by a 9th-century Duke of Friuli.
ECKART   m   German
Variant of EKKEHARD.
ECKBERT   m   German
German cognate of EGBERT.
ECKEHARD   m   German
Variant of EKKEHARD.
ECKHARD   m   German
Variant of EKKEHARD.
ECKHART   m   German
Variant of EKKEHARD.
EDMUND   m   English, German, Polish
From the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and mund "protection". This was the name of two Anglo-Saxon kings of England. It was also borne by two saints, including a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman conquest (even being used by king Henry III for one of his sons), though it became less common after the 15th century.... [more]
EGON   m   German
Derived from the Germanic element ag, which means "edge of a sword".
EIKE   m   German
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ag "edge".
EKKEHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ag "edge" and hard "brave, hardy".
EKKEHARDT   m   German
Variant of EKKEHARD.
ELIAS   m   Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Cognate of ELIJAH. This is the form used in the Greek New Testament.
ELMO   m   English, German, Italian
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element helm meaning "helmet, protection". It is also a derivative of ERASMUS, via the old Italian diminutive Ermo. Saint Elmo, also known as Saint Erasmus, was a 4th-century martyr who is the patron of sailors. Saint Elmo's fire is said to be a sign of his protection.
EMIL   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Polish, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Hungarian, Icelandic, English
From the Roman family name Aemilius, which was derived from Latin aemulus meaning "rival".
EMMERICH   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, in which the second element is ric meaning "power". The first element may be ermen "whole, universal" (making it a relative of Ermenrich), amal "work, labour" (making it a relative of Amalric) or heim "home" (making it a relative of Henry). It is likely that several forms merged into a single name.
ENGEL   m   German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Originally this was a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element Angil, the name of a Germanic tribe (known in English as the Angles). Since the Middle Ages it has been firmly associated with the German word engel meaning "angel".
ENGELBERT   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements Angil, the name of a Germanic tribe known in English as the Angles, and beraht "bright". Saint Engelbert was a 13th-century archbishop of Cologne murdered by assassins.
ERDMANN   m   German
Variant of HARTMANN. It can also be interpreted as meaning "earth man" from German Erde "earth", and thus was sometimes used as a translation of Adam.
ERHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element era "honour, respect" or hari "army" combined with hard "brave, hardy". In some cases it may be a variant of EBERHARD.
ERIC   m   English, Swedish, German, Spanish
From the Old Norse name Eiríkr, derived from the elements ei "ever, always" and ríkr "ruler". A notable bearer was Eiríkr inn Rauda (Eric the Red in English), a 10th-century navigator and explorer who discovered Greenland. This was also the name of several early kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway.... [more]
ERICH   m   German
German form of ERIC. The German novelist Erich Maria Remarque (1898-1970) was the author of 'All Quiet on the Western Front'.
ERIK   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Scandinavian form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
ERNST   m   German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of ERNEST.
ERWIN   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic name Hariwini, composed of the elements hari "army" and win "friend". It may have merged somewhat with the Germanic name EBURWIN. A notable bearer was Erwin Schrodinger (1887-1961), an Austrian physicist who made contributions to quantum theory.
EUGEN   m   German, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Croatian
Form of Eugenius (see EUGENE).
EVELYN   f & m   English, German
From an English surname which was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
EWALD   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name which was composed of the elements ewa "law, custom" and wald "rule".
FABIAN   m   German, Dutch, Polish, History
From the Roman cognomen Fabianus, which was derived from FABIUS. Saint Fabian was a 3rd-century pope.
FALK   m   German
Means "falcon" in German.
FELIX   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.... [more]
FERDI   m   German, Dutch
Short form of FERDINAND.
FERDINAND   m   German, French, Dutch, English, Czech, Slovene, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
From Ferdinando, the old Spanish form of a Germanic name composed of the elements fardi "journey" and nand "daring, brave". The Visigoths brought the name to the Iberian Peninsula, where it entered into the royal families of Spain and Portugal. From there it became common among the Habsburg royal family of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria, starting with the Spanish-born Ferdinand I in the 16th century. A notable bearer was Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan (1480-1521), called Fernão de Magalhães in Portuguese, who was the leader of the first expedition to sail around the earth.
FIETE   m   German
Diminutive of FRIEDRICH.
FILIBERT   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Means "much brightness" from the Germanic elements filu "much" and beraht "bright".
FLORIAN   m   German, Polish, French
From the Roman name Florianus, a derivative of FLORUS. Saint Florian, a martyr of the 3rd century, is the patron saint of Poland and Upper Austria.
FRANK (1)   m   English, German, Dutch, French
From a Germanic name which referred to a member of the Germanic tribe, the Franks. The Franks settled in the regions now called France and the Netherlands in the 3rd and 4th century. They derived their tribal name from the name of a type of spear that they used. From medieval times, the various forms of this name have been commonly conflated with the various forms of Francis.... [more]
FRANZ   m   German
German form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS). This name was borne by the influential author Franz Kafka (1883-1924), writer of 'The Trial' and 'The Castle' among other works. Also, rulers of Austria and the Holy Roman Empire have had this name.
FRED   m   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese
Short form of FREDERICK or other names containing the same element. A famous bearer was the American actor and dancer Fred Astaire (1899-1987).
FREJ   m   Danish, Swedish, German
Danish, Swedish and German form of FREYR.
FRIEDEMANN   m   German
Means "man of peace" from the Germanic elements frid "peace" and man "man".
FRIEDHELM   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements frid "peace" and helm "helmet, protection".
FRIEDHOLD   m   German
Means "peaceful ruler", derived from the Germanic elements frid "peace" and wald "rule".
FRIEDRICH   m   German
German form of FREDERICK. This was the name of kings of Germany. The socialist Friedrich Engels (1820-1895) and the philosopher Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) are two famous bearers of this name.
FRITZ   m   German
German diminutive of FRIEDRICH.
GABI   f & m   German, Romanian, Hungarian
German diminutive of GABRIELE (2) (feminine), Romanian diminutive of GABRIEL (masculine) or GABRIELA (feminine), and Hungarian diminutive of GÁBOR (masculine) or GABRIELLA (feminine).
GABRIEL   m   French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.... [more]
GEBHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element geb "gift" combined with hard "brave, hardy". Saint Gebhard was a 10th-century bishop of Constance.
GEORG   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian
Form of GEORGE. This name was borne by the German idealist philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831).
GERALD   m   English, German
From a Germanic name meaning "rule of the spear", from the elements ger "spear" and wald "rule". The Normans brought this name to Britain. Though it died out in England during the Middle Ages, it remained common in Ireland. It was revived in the English-speaking world in 19th century.
GERD (1)   m   German, Dutch
Short form of GERHARD.
GEREON   m   German, Late Roman
Possibly derived from Greek γερων (geron) meaning "old man, elder". This was the name of a saint martyred in Cologne in the 4th century.
GERFRIED   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and frid "peace".
GERHARD   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of GERARD.
GERHARDT   m   German
German form of GERARD.
GERHOLD   m   German (Archaic)
German form of GERALD.
GERNOT   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and hnod "crush".
GERO   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear".
GEROLD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of GERALD.
GERT   m   German, Dutch
German and Dutch short form of GERHARD.
GERULF   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from Germanic ger "spear" and wulf "wolf".
GERVAS   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of GERVASIUS.
GILBERT   m   English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
GISBERT   m   German, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name in which the second element is beraht "bright". The first element is probably a shortened form of gisil "pledge, hostage" (making it a variant of GILBERT), though it could be related to Gallo-Celtic gaiso "spear".
GOTTFRIED   m   German
German form of GODFREY. This name was borne by the 13th-century German poet Gottfried von Strassburg and the German philosopher and mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (1646-1716), one of the inventors of calculus.
GOTTHARD   m   German
German form of GODEHARD.
GOTTHILF   m   German
Derived from German Gott "God" and hilf "help". This name was created in the 17th century.
GOTTHOLD   m   German
Derived from German Gott "God" and hold "lovely". This name was created in the 17th century.
GOTTLIEB   m   German
German form of GOTELEIB.
GOTTLOB   m   German
Derived from German Gott "God" and lob "praise". This name was created in the 17th century.
GOTTSCHALK   m   German (Archaic)
Derived from the Germanic elements god "god" and scalc "servant". Saint Gottschalk was a (perhaps spurious) 11th-century prince of the Wends who was martyred by his brother-in-law.
GREGOR   m   German, Scottish, Slovak, Slovene
German, Scottish, Slovak and Slovene form of GREGORY. A famous bearer was Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), a Czech monk and scientist who did experiments in genetics.
GUIDO   m   Italian, German
Latinized form of WIDO. This was the name of two 11th-century saints. Other notable bearers include 11th-century music theorist Guido d'Arezzo, 13th-century poet Guido Cavalcanti, and 17th-century painter Guido Reni.
GÜNTER   m   German
Variant of GÜNTHER.
GUNTER   m   German
Variant of GÜNTHER.
GÜNTHER   m   German, Germanic Mythology
From the Germanic name Gundahar, derived from the elements gund "war" and hari "army, warrior". This was the name of a semi-legendary 5th-century Burgundian king. He appears in the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied', which has him wooing the Icelandic queen Brünhild. He wins her hand in marriage with the help of the hero Siegfried. He ultimately betrays Siegfried, but Siegfried's widow Kriemhild (Günther's sister) takes her revenge upon him.
GUNTHER   m   German
Variant of GÜNTHER.
GUNTRAM   m   German
Means "war raven" from the Germanic elements gund "war" and hramn "raven". This was the name of a 6th-century Frankish king.
GUSTAF   m   Swedish, German
Swedish and German variant of GUSTAV.
GUSTAV   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Possibly means "staff of the Goths", derived from the Old Norse elements Gautr "Goth" and stafr "staff". However, the root name Gautstafr is not well attested in the Old Norse period. Alternatively, it might be derived from the Slavic name GOSTISLAV. This name has been borne by six kings of Sweden, including the 16th-century Gustav I Vasa.
HAGEN (1)   m   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic element hagan meaning "enclosure". In the Germanic saga the 'Nibelungenlied' he is the half-brother of Günther. He killed the hero Siegfried by luring him onto a hunting expedition and then stabbing him with a javelin in his one vulnerable spot.
HANNE (1)   f & m   Danish, Norwegian, German, Dutch
Danish and Norwegian short form of JOHANNE, or a German and Dutch short form of JOHANNA. This can also be a Dutch short form of JOHANNES (masculine).
HANNES   m   German, Swedish, Dutch, Finnish
Short form of JOHANNES.
HANS   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German, Dutch and Scandinavian short form of JOHANNES. Two famous bearers were Hans Holbein (1497-1543), a Renaissance portrait painter from Germany, and Hans Christian Andersen (1805-1875), a Danish writer of fairy tales.
HARALD   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Scandinavian and German cognate of HAROLD. This was the name of several kings of Norway and Denmark.
HARTMANN   m   German
Means "brave man", derived from the Germanic element hard "brave, hardy" combined with man.
HARTMUT   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave mind", derived from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and muot "mind, spirit".
HARTWIG   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and wig "battle".
HARTWIN   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave friend" from the Germanic elements hard "brave, hardy" and win "friend".
HEIKE   f & m   Low German, Frisian, Dutch
Low German diminutive of HENRIKE or HEINRICH.
HEIKO   m   Low German, Frisian, Dutch
Low German diminutive of HEINRICH.
HEINER   m   German
Diminutive of HEINRICH.
HEINO   m   German, Dutch, Danish, Finnish, Estonian
German form of Haimo (see HAMO).
HEINRICH   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of HENRY. This was the name of several German kings.
HEINZ   m   German
Diminutive of HEINRICH.
HELFRIED   m   German
Variant of HELMFRIED.
HELGE   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Helgi, derived from heilagr meaning "holy, blessed".
HELMFRIED   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements helm "helmet" and frid "peace".
HELMUT   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element helm "helmet" or heil "healthy" combined with muot "spirit, mind".
HELMUTH   m   German
Variant of HELMUT.
HENDRIK   m   Dutch, German, Estonian
Dutch and Estonian cognate of HENRY.
HENNING   m   German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Diminutive of HENRIK.
HERBERT   m   English, German, French, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Herebeorht. In the course of the Middle Ages it became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
HERIBERT   m   German
German form of HERBERT.
HERMANN   m   German
German form of HERMAN.
HERMENEGILD   m   German
German form of HERMENEGILDO.
HIERONYMUS   m   German, Dutch (Archaic), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latin form of JEROME used in Germany and the Netherlands. Hieronymus Bosch was a 15th-century Dutch painter known for his depictions of the torments of hell.
HILBERT   m   German
Variant of HILDEBERT.
HILDEBERT   m   German
Means "bright battle" from the Germanic elements hild "battle" and beraht "bright".
HILDEBRAND   m   German (Archaic), Ancient Germanic
Means "battle sword", derived from the Germanic element hild "battle" combined with brand "sword". This was the name of the hero of an 8th-century poem written in Old High German.
HINNERK   m   Low German
Low German form of HEINRICH.
HINRICH   m   Low German
Low German form of HEINRICH.
HORST   m   German
Means "wood, thicket" in German. Alternatively, it may derive from the Germanic element hros or hors meaning "horse".
HUBERT   m   English, German, Dutch, French, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright heart", derived from the Germanic elements hug "heart, mind" and beraht "bright". Saint Hubert was an 8th-century bishop of Maastricht who is considered the patron saint of hunters. The Normans brought the name to England, where it replaced an Old English cognate Hygebeorht. It died out during the Middle Ages but was revived in the 19th century.
HUGO   m   Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
HUMBERT   m   German, French, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Means "bright warrior", derived from the Germanic elements hun "warrior, bear cub" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, though it has always been uncommon there. It was borne by two kings of Italy (called Umberto in Italian), who ruled in the 19th and 20th centuries.
IGNATZ   m   German
German form of IGNATIUS.
IMMANUEL   m   German, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Form of EMMANUEL used in most translations of the Old Testament. Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was a German philosopher who held that duty was of highest importance.
INGE   f & m   Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Dutch
Short form of Scandinavian and German names beginning with the element ing, which refers to the Germanic god ING. In Sweden and Norway this is primarily a masculine name, elsewhere it is usually feminine.
INGO   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German masculine form of INGE.
INGOLF   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Ingólfr, which was derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with úlfr meaning "wolf".
INGOMAR   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of INGEMAR.
ISAAK   m   Russian, German, Biblical Greek
Russian and German form of ISAAC, as well as the form used in the Greek Old Testament.
ISIDOR   m   German, Russian, Macedonian
German, Russian and Macedonian form of ISIDORE.
IVO (1)   m   German, Dutch, Italian, Portuguese, Czech, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element iv meaning "yew". Alternative theories suggest that it may in fact be derived from a cognate Celtic element. This was the name of several saints (who are also commonly known as Saint Yves or Ives).
JAN (1)   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Polish, Slovene, German, Catalan
Form of JOHANNES. This name was borne by the 15th-century Flemish painter Jan van Eyck and the 17th-century Dutch painter Jan Vermeer.
JEREMIAS   m   German, Portuguese, Finnish
German, Portuguese and Finnish form of JEREMIAH.
JO   f & m   English, German, Dutch
Short form of JOAN (1), JOANNA, JOSEPHINE, or other names that begin with Jo. It is primarily masculine in German and Dutch, short for JOHANNES or JOSEF.
JOACHIM   m   French, German, Polish, Judeo-Christian Legend
Contracted form of JEHOIACHIN or JEHOIAKIM. According to the apocryphal Gospel of James, Saint Joachim was the husband of Saint Anne and the father of the Virgin Mary. Due to his popularity in the Middle Ages, the name came into general use in Christian Europe (though it was never common in England).
JOCHEN   m   German
German form of JOACHIM.
JOCHIM   m   German
German variant form of JOACHIM.
JOCKEL   m   German
Diminutive of JAKOB, JÖRG or JOACHIM.
JOHANN   m   German
German form of Iohannes (see JOHN). Famous bearers include German composer Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), German novelist and poet Johann Goethe (1749-1832), and Austrian composers Johann Strauss the Elder (1804-1849) and his son Johann Strauss the Younger (1825-1899).
JOHANNES   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Late Roman
Latin form of Ioannes (see JOHN). Notable bearers include the inventor of the printing press Johannes Gutenberg (1398-1468), astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) and composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897).
JONAS (2)   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Biblical
From Ιωνας (Ionas), the Greek form of JONAH. This spelling is used in some English translations of the New Testament.
JONATAN   m   Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Spanish form of JONATHAN, as well as a Scandinavian and German variant form.
JONATHAN   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan),contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "YAHWEH has given". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.... [more]
JÖRG   m   German
German short form of GEORGE.
JOSEF   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech
German, Scandinavian and Czech form of JOSEPH.
JOSEPH   m   English, French, German, Biblical
From Ioseph, the Latin form of Greek Ιωσηφ (Ioseph), which was from the Hebrew name יוֹסֵף (Yosef) meaning "he will add". In the Old Testament Joseph is the eleventh son of Jacob and the first with his wife Rachel. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This name also occurs in the New Testament, belonging to Saint Joseph the husband of Mary, and to Joseph of Arimathea.... [more]
JOST   m   German
German form of Iudocus (see JOYCE).
JULIAN   m   English, Polish, German
From the Roman name Iulianus, which was derived from JULIUS. This was the name of the last pagan Roman emperor, Julian the Apostate (4th century). It was also borne by several early saints, including the legendary Saint Julian the Hospitaller. This name has been used in England since the Middle Ages, at which time it was also a feminine name (from Juliana, eventually becoming Gillian).
JULIUS   m   Ancient Roman, English, German
From a Roman family name which was possibly derived from Greek ιουλος (ioulos) "downy-bearded". Alternatively, it could be related to the name of the Roman god JUPITER. This was a prominent patrician family of Rome, who claimed descent from the mythological Julus, son of Aeneas. Its most notable member was Gaius Julius Caesar, who gained renown as a military leader for his clever conquest of Gaul. After a civil war he became the dictator of the Roman Republic, but was eventually stabbed to death in the senate.... [more]
JÜRGEN   m   Low German
Low German form of GEORGE.
JUSTUS   m   German, Dutch, Late Roman
Latin name which meant "just". This name was borne by at least eight saints.
KAI (1)   m   Frisian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of GERHARD, NICOLAAS, CORNELIS or GAIUS.
KARL   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
German and Scandinavian form of CHARLES. This was the name of seven emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and an emperor of Austria, as well as kings of Sweden and Norway. Other famous bearers include Karl Marx (1818-1883), the German philosopher and revolutionary who laid the foundations for communism, and Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), a German existentialist philosopher.
KARLMANN   m   German (Archaic)
German form of CARLOMAN.
KARSTEN   m   Low German, Danish, Norwegian
Low German form of CHRISTIAN.
KASIMIR   m   German
German form of CASIMIR.
KASPAR   m   German
German form of JASPER.
KAYETAN   m   German
German form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
KEVIN   m   English, Irish, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín, derived from the older Irish Cóemgein, composed of the Old Irish elements cóem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the 20th century.
KILIAN   m   German, Irish, French
German form and Irish and French variant of CILLIAN.
KLAAS   m   Dutch, Low German
Dutch and Low German short form of NICHOLAS.
KLAUS   m   German, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish
German short form of NICHOLAS.
KLEMENS   m   German, Danish, Swedish, Polish
German, Danish, Swedish and Polish form of Clemens (see CLEMENT). Prince Klemens Metternich was a 19th-century Austrian chancellor who guided the Austrian Empire to victory in the Napoleonic Wars.
KNUT   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Derived from Old Norse knútr meaning "knot". Knut was a Danish prince who defeated Æðelræd II, king of England, in the early 11th century and became the ruler of Denmark, Norway and England.
KOLMAN   m   German (Rare)
Variant of KOLOMAN.
KOLOMAN   m   German (Rare), Slovak
German and Slovak form of COLMÁN. Saint Koloman (also called Coloman or Colman) was an Irish monk who was martyred in Stockerau in Austria.
KONRAD   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Slovene
German, Scandinavian, Polish and Slovene form of CONRAD.
KORBINIAN   m   German
Derived from Latin corvus meaning "raven". This was the name of an 8th-century Frankish saint who was sent by Pope Gregory II to evangelize in Bavaria. His real name may have been Hraban (see Raban).
KÖRBL   m   German
Diminutive of KORBINIAN.
KORD   m   German
German contracted form of CONRAD.
KUNIBERT   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements kuni "clan, family" and beraht "bright".
KUNO   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from Germanic kuni meaning "clan, family".
KURT   m   German, English
German contracted form of CONRAD. A famous bearer was the American musician Kurt Cobain (1967-1994).
LAMBERT   m   German, Dutch, French, English, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements land "land" and beraht "bright". Saint Lambert of Maastricht was a 7th-century bishop who was martyred after denouncing Pepin II for adultery.
LANZO   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of LANCE.
LARS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, German
Scandinavian form of LAURENCE (1).
LAURENZ   m   German
German form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LEBERECHT   m   German
Means "live rightly" from German lebe "live" and recht "right". This name was created in the 17th century.
LENNART   m   Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Low German, Dutch
Swedish and Low German form of LEONARD.
LENZ   m   German
Short form of LORENZ. This is also a German poetic word referring to the springtime.
LEO   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LEON   m   English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.
LEONARD   m   English, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave lion", derived from the Germanic elements levon "lion" and hard "brave, hardy". This was the name of a 5th-century Frankish saint from Noblac who is the patron of prisoners and horses. The Normans brought this name to England, though it did not become common there until the 19th century.
LEONHARD   m   German
German form of LEONARD. Leonhard Euler was a Swiss mathematician who made many important contributions to calculus, number theory, geometry and theoretical physics.
LEOPOLD   m   German, Dutch, English, Slovene, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements leud "people" and bald "bold". The spelling was altered due to association with Latin leo "lion". This name was common among German royalty, first with the Babenbergs and then the Habsburgs. Saint Leopold was a 12th-century Babenberg margrave of Austria, who is now considered the patron of that country. It was also borne by two Habsburg Holy Roman Emperors, as well as three kings of Belgium. Since the 19th century this name has been occasionally used in England, originally in honour of Queen Victoria's uncle, a king of Belgium, after whom she named one of her sons. It was later used by James Joyce for the main character, Leopold Bloom, in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920).
LINUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized), German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Greek name Λινος (Linos) meaning "flax". In Greek legend he was the son of the god Apollo, who accidentally killed him in a contest. Another son of Apollo by this name was the music teacher of Herakles. The name was also borne by the second pope, serving after Saint Peter in the 1st century. In modern times it was the name of a character in Charles Schulz's comic strip 'Peanuts'.
LORENZ   m   German
German form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LOTHAR   m   German, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Chlodochar meaning "famous army", derived from the elements hlud "famous" and hari "army". This was the name of a 9th-century Frankish king, the son of Louis I, who ruled the region called Lorraine. It was also borne by medieval kings of France, Italy and the Holy Roman Empire.
LUCA (1)   m   Italian, Romanian, German
Italian and Romanian form of LUKE. This name was borne by Luca della Robbia, a Renaissance sculptor from Florence.
LUDGER   m   German, Dutch
From the Germanic name Leudagar which was derived from the elements leud "people" and ger "spear". Saint Ludger was an 8th-century Frisian Benedictine bishop who founded a monastery at Munster.
LUDOLF   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hludwolf which was composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wolf "wolf".
LUDWIG   m   German
From the Germanic name Chlodovech, which was composed of the elements hlud "famous" and wig "war, battle". This was the name of three Merovingian kings of the Franks (though their names are usually spelled in the Latinized form Clovis) as well as several Carolingian kings and Holy Roman Emperors (names often spelled in the French form Louis). Other famous bearers include the German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) and the Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951), who contributed to logic and the philosophy of language.
LUITGER   m   German (Archaic)
Variant of LUDGER.
LUITPOLD   m   German
German variant of LEOPOLD.
LUKAS   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Lithuanian
German, Scandinavian and Lithuanian form of LUKE.
LUTZ   m   German
German diminutive of LUDWIG.
MALTE   m   Danish, Swedish, German
Short form of the Germanic name HELMOLD.
MALTHE   m   Danish, German
Variant of MALTE.
MANFRED   m   German, Dutch, Polish
Derived from the Germanic elements magan "strength" and frid "peace". This is the name of the main character in Byron's drama 'Manfred' (1817). This name was also borne by Manfred von Richthofen (1892-1918), the German pilot in World War I who was known as the Red Baron.
MANFRIED   m   German
German form of MANFRED.
MANU (2)   m & f   French, Spanish, German, Finnish
Short form of MANUEL or EMMANUEL (or MANUELA in Germany).
MANUEL   m   Spanish, Portuguese, German, English, Italian, French, Romanian, Late Greek (Latinized)
Spanish and Portuguese form of EMMANUEL. In the spelling Μανουηλ (Manouel) it was also used in the Byzantine Empire, notably by two emperors. It is possible this form of the name was transmitted to Spain and Portugal from Byzantium, since there were connections between the royal families (king Ferdinand III of Castile married Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, who had Byzantine roots, and had a son named Manuel). The name has been used in Iberia since at least the 13th century and was borne by two kings of Portugal.
MARCELL   m   Hungarian, German
Hungarian and German form of MARCELLUS.
MARCELLUS   m   Ancient Roman, German, Dutch
Roman family name which was originally a diminutive of MARCUS. This was the name of two popes.
MARCO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Italian form of MARK. During the Middle Ages this name was common in Venice, where Saint Mark was supposedly buried. A famous bearer was the Venetian explorer Marco Polo, who travelled across Asia to China in the 13th century.
MARIA   f & m   Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARIUS   m   Ancient Roman, Romanian, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, French
Roman family name which was derived either from MARS, the name of the Roman god of War, or else from the Latin root mas, maris meaning "male". Gaius Marius was a famous Roman consul of the 2nd century BC. Since the start of the Christian era, it has occasionally been used as a masculine form of MARIA.
MARKUS   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
German, Scandinavian and Finnish form of MARK.
MARTIN   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
MARVIN   m   English, German
Probably from an English surname which was derived from the given name MERVYN. A famous bearer was the American musician Marvin Gaye (1939-1984).
MARWIN   m   German
German variant of MARVIN.
MARZELL   m   German
German variant of MARCELLUS.
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