Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the usage is German.
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MATHIS   m   German, French
German and French form of MATTHIAS.
MATTHÄUS   m   German
German form of MATTHEW, used to refer to the evangelist and apostle also known as Levi.
MATTHIAS   m   Greek, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, French, Dutch, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Variant of Matthaios (see MATTHEW) which appears in the New Testament as the name of the apostle chosen to replace the traitor Judas Iscariot. This was also the name of kings of Hungary, including Matthias I who made important reforms to the kingdom in the 15th century.
MATTIAS   m   German, Swedish
Variant of MATTHIAS.
MAX   m   German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
Short form of MAXIMILIAN (or sometimes of MAXWELL in English).
MAXIMILIAN   m   German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Roman name Maximilianus, which was derived from MAXIMUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint and martyr. In the 15th century the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III gave this name to his son and eventual heir. In this case it was a blend of the names of the Roman generals Fabius Maximus and Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus (see EMILIANO), who Frederick admired. It was subsequently borne by a second Holy Roman Emperor, two kings of Bavaria, and a short-lived Habsburg emperor of Mexico.
MEINARD   m   German
Variant of MEINHARD.
MEINE   m   Frisian, Dutch, German
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element magan meaning "strength".
MEINHARD   m   German
German form of MEGINHARD.
MEINO   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Variant of MEINE.
MEINRAD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements magan "mighty, strong" and rad "counsel". Saint Meinrad was a 9th-century hermit who founded the Benedictine abbey at Einsiedeln in Switzerland.
MENNO   m   Dutch, German
Diminutive of MEINE.
MERTEN   m   German
German variant of MARTIN.
MICHAEL   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.... [more]
MICHEL   m   French, German, Dutch
French form of MICHAEL. Michel de Notredame, also known as Nostradamus, was the 16th-century French astrologer who made predictions about future world events. This is also the German diminutive form of MICHAEL.
MICHI (2)   m & f   German
German diminutive of MICHAEL or MICHAELA.
MORITZ   m   German
German form of MAURICE.
MOSE   m   German
German variant of MOSES.
NICKOLAUS   m   German
Variant of NIKOLAUS.
NICO   m   Italian, Dutch, German, Spanish, Portuguese
Short form of NICHOLAS (or sometimes NICODEMUS).
NICOLAUS   m   German, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Nikolaos (see NICHOLAS). This form is also used in Germany.
NIKLAS   m   Swedish, Finnish, Danish, Norwegian, German
Swedish form of NICHOLAS.
NIKLAUS   m   German (Swiss)
Swiss German form of NICHOLAS.
NIKOLAUS   m   German
German form of NICHOLAS.
NORBERT   m   German, English, Dutch, French, Hungarian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements nord "north" and beraht "bright". This was the name of an 11th-century German saint who made many reforms within the church.
OLAF   m   Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Polish
From the Old Norse name Áleifr meaning "ancestor's descendant", derived from the elements anu "ancestor" and leifr "descendant". This was the name of five kings of Norway, including Saint Olaf (Olaf II).
OLIVER   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
ORTWIN   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ort "point" and win "friend".
OSKAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish
Scandinavian, German, Polish and Slovene form of OSCAR. A famous bearer was Oskar Schindler (1908-1974), who saved over a thousand Polish Jews during World War II.
OSWALD   m   English, German, Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler". Saint Oswald was a king of Northumbria who introduced Christianity to northeast England in the 7th century before being killed in battle. There was also an Old Norse cognate Ásvaldr in use in England, being borne by the 10th-century Saint Oswald of Worcester, who was of Danish ancestry. Though the name had died out by the end of the Middle Ages, it was revived in the 19th century.
OTMAR   m   German, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Audamar, which was derived from the elements aud "wealth, fortune" and meri "famous". This was the name of an 8th-century Swiss saint, an abbot of Saint Gall.
OTTMAR   m   German
Variant of OTMAR.
OTTO   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, Ancient Germanic
Later German form of Audo or Odo, originally a short form of various names beginning with the Germanic element aud meaning "wealth, fortune". This was the name of four kings of Germany, starting in the 10th century with Otto I, the first Holy Roman Emperor, who was known as Otto the Great. This name was also borne by a 19th-century king of Greece who was originally from Bavaria. Another notable bearer was the German chancellor Otto von Bismarck (1815-1898).
OTTOKAR   m   German
German form of ODOVACAR.
OTTOMAR   m   German
Variant of OTMAR.
PANKRAZ   m   German
German form of PANCRATIUS.
PARSIFAL   m   German
German form of PERCIVAL.
PASCAL   m   French, German, Dutch
From the Late Latin name Paschalis, which meant "relating to Easter" from Latin Pascha "Easter", which was in turn from Hebrew פֶּסַח (pesach) "Passover". Passover is the ancient Hebrew holiday celebrating the liberation from Egypt. Because it coincided closely with the later Christian holiday of Easter, the same Latin word was used for both. The name Pascal can also function as a surname, as in the case of Blaise Pascal, the French philosopher, mathematician and inventor.
PATRICK   m   Irish, English, French, German
From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint.... [more]
PAUL   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Biblical
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him. After this he travelled the eastern Mediterranean as a missionary. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Many of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.... [more]
PETER   m   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Slovak, Biblical
Derived from the Greek Πετρος (Petros) meaning "stone". This is a translation used in most versions of the New Testament of the name Cephas, meaning "stone" in Aramaic, which was given to the apostle Simon by Jesus (compare Matthew 16:18 and John 1:42). Simon Peter was the most prominent of the apostles during Jesus' ministry and is often considered the first pope.... [more]
PETRUS   m   Dutch, German, Biblical Latin
Latin form of PETER used in Dutch and German.
PHILIPP   m   German
German form of PHILIP.
POLDI   m   German
German diminutive of LEOPOLD.
QUIRIN   m   German
German form of QUIRINUS.
RAFFAEL   m   German
German variant of RAPHAEL.
RAIMUND   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of RAYMOND.
RAINER   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of RAYNER.
RALPH   m   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German
Contracted form of the Old Norse name RÁÐÚLFR (or its Norman form Radulf). Scandinavian settlers introduced it to England before the Norman conquest, though afterwards it was bolstered by Norman influence. In the Middle Ages it was usually spelled Ralf, but by the 17th century it was most commonly Rafe, reflecting the normal pronunciation. The Ralph spelling appeared in the 18th century. A famous bearer of the name was Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism.
RAPHAEL   m   German, French, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) which meant "God has healed". In Hebrew tradition Raphael was the name of one of the seven archangels. He appears in the Book of Tobit, in which he disguises himself as a man named Azarias and accompanies Tobias on his journey to Media, aiding him along the way. In the end he cures Tobias's father Tobit of his blindness. He is not mentioned in the New Testament, though tradition identifies him with the angel troubling the water in John 5:4.... [more]
REIMUND   m   German
German form of RAYMOND.
REIN   m   German, Frisian, Dutch
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element ragin "advice, counsel".
REINER   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of RAYNER.
REINHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of REYNARD.
REINHOLD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of REYNOLD.
RENÉ   m   French, German, Spanish, Slovak, Czech
French form of RENATUS. A famous bearer was the French mathematician and rationalist philosopher René Descartes (1596-1650).
RETO   m   German (Swiss)
Means "of Rhaetia". Rhaetia is a region in eastern Switzerland that got its name from the Rhaeti, a Celtic tribe who originally inhabited the area.
RICHARD   m   English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.... [more]
ROBERT   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.... [more]
ROCHUS   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of ROCCO, used in German and Dutch.
RODOLF   m   German (Rare), Dutch (Rare)
German form of RUDOLF.
ROGER   m   English, French, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear". The Normans brought this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hroðgar (the name of the Danish king in the Anglo-Saxon epic 'Beowulf'). It was a common name in England during the Middle Ages. By the 18th century it was rare, but it was revived in following years. The name was borne by the Norman lords Roger I, who conquered Sicily in the 11th century, and his son Roger II, who ruled Sicily as a king.
ROLAND   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Medieval French
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and land meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
ROLF   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
From the Germanic name Hrolf (or its Old Norse cognate Hrólfr), a contracted form of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF). The Normans introduced this name to England but it soon became rare. In the modern era it has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world as a German import.
ROMAN   m   Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German
From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".
RUDI   m   German, Hungarian
Diminutive of RUDOLF.
RÜDIGER   m   German
German form of ROGER.
RUDOLF   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Slovene, Croatian, Russian, Armenian
From the Germanic name Hrodulf, which was derived from the elements hrod "fame" and wulf "wolf". It was borne by three kings of Burgundy, as well as several Habsburg rulers of the Holy Roman Empire and Austria. Anthony Hope used this name for the hero in his popular novel 'The Prisoner of Zenda' (1894).
RUEDI   m   German (Swiss)
Swiss diminutive of RUDOLF.
RUPERT   m   German, Dutch, English, Polish
German variant form of ROBERT. The military commander Prince Rupert of the Rhine, a nephew of Charles I, introduced this name to England in the 17th century.
RUPRECHT   m   German (Archaic)
Variant of RUPERT.
SAMUEL   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name שְׁמוּאֵל (Shemu'el) which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard". As told in the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament, Samuel was the last of the ruling judges. He led the Israelites during a period of domination by the Philistines, who were ultimately defeated in battle at Mizpah. Later he anointed Saul to be the first king of Israel, and even later anointed his successor David.... [more]
SASCHA   m & f   German
German form of SASHA.
SEBASTIAN   m   German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Finnish, Romanian
From the Latin name Sebastianus which meant "from Sebaste". Sebaste was the name a town in Asia Minor, its name deriving from Greek σεβαστος (sebastos) "venerable" (a translation of Latin Augustus, the title of the Roman emperors). According to Christian tradition, Saint Sebastian was a 3rd-century Roman soldier martyred during the persecutions of the emperor Diocletian. After he was discovered to be a Christian, he was tied to a stake and shot with arrows. This however did not kill him. Saint Irene of Rome healed him and he returned to personally admonish Diocletian, whereupon the emperor had him beaten to death.... [more]
SEPP   m   German
German diminutive of JOSEPH.
SEPPEL   m   German
German diminutive of JOSEPH.
SEVERIN   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
German and Scandinavian form of SEVERINUS.
SIEGBERT   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and beraht "bright". This was the name of several Frankish kings, including the 7th-century Sigebert III of Austrasia who is regarded as a saint.
SIEGER   m   Dutch, German
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and hari "army".
SIEGFRIED   m   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and frid "peace". Siegfried was a hero from Germanic legend, chief character in the 'Nibelungenlied'. He secretly helped the Burgundian king Günther overcome the challenges set out by the Icelandic queen Brünhild so that Günther might win her hand. In exchange, Günther consented to the marriage of Siegfried and his sister Kriemhild. Years later, after a dispute between Brünhild and Kriemhild, Siegfried was murdered by Hagen with Günther's consent. He was stabbed in his one vulnerable spot on the small of his back, which had been covered by a leaf while he bathed in dragon's blood. His adventures were largely based on those of the Norse hero Sigurd. The story was later adapted by Richard Wagner to form part of his opera 'The Ring of the Nibelung' (1876).
SIEGHARD   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and hard "brave, hardy".
SIEGMUND   m   German
German variant of SIGMUND.
SIEGWARD   m   German
German form of SIGURD.
SIGI   m & f   German
Diminutive of SIEGFRIED, SIEGLINDE, and other Germanic names beginning with the element sigu which means "victory".
SIGISMUND   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Form of SIGMUND in which the first element is sigis, an older form of sigu. Saint Sigismund was a 6th-century king of the Burgundians. This was also the name of kings of Poland and a ruler of the Holy Roman Empire.
SIGMUND   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and mund "protector" (or in the case of the Scandinavian cognate, from the Old Norse elements sigr "victory" and mundr "protector"). In Norse mythology this was the name of the hero Sigurd's father, the bearer of the powerful sword Gram. A notable bearer was the Austrian psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the creator of the revolutionary theory of psychoanalysis.
SILVESTER   m   Dutch, English, Slovene, Slovak, German, Late Roman
From a Roman name meaning "of the forest" from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the name of three popes, including Saint Silvester I who supposedly baptized the first Christian Roman emperor, Constantine the Great. As an English name, Silvester (or Sylvester) has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became less common after the Protestant Reformation.
SIMON   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Slovene, Romanian, Macedonian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From Σιμων (Simon), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name שִׁמְעוֹן (Shim'on) which meant "he has heard". This name is spelled Simeon, based on Greek Συμεων, in many translations of the Old Testament, where it is borne by the second son of Jacob. In the New Testament Simon is the name of several characters, including the man who carried the cross for Jesus. Most importantly however it was borne by the leading apostle Simon, also known as Peter (a name given to him by Jesus).... [more]
SÖREN   m   Swedish, German
Swedish and German form of SØREN.
STEFFEN   m   Low German, Danish, Norwegian, Dutch
Low German and Danish form of STEPHEN.
STEPHAN   m   German, Dutch
German and Dutch form of STEPHEN.
SVEN   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
From the Old Norse byname Sveinn which meant "boy". This was the name of kings of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
SYLVESTER   m   English, Dutch, Danish, German
Medieval variant of SILVESTER. This is currently the usual English spelling of the name. The actor Sylvester Stallone (1946-) is a famous bearer.
THEODOR   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Romanian
German form of THEODORE, as well as a Scandinavian, Czech and Romanian variant of TEODOR. A famous bearer was American children's book creator Theodor Seuss Geisel (1904-1991), better known as Dr. Seuss.
THEOPHIL   m   German
German form of THEOPHILUS.
THILO   m   German
Variant of TILO.
THOMAS   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') which meant "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of an apostle. When he heard that Jesus had risen from the dead he initially doubted the story, until Jesus appeared before him and he examined his wounds himself. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.... [more]
THORBEN   m   Danish, German
Variant of TORBEN.
THORSTEN   m   Swedish, Danish, German
Variant of TORSTEN.
TIEDEMANN   m   German (Archaic)
Germanic name derived from the elements theud "people" and man "man".
TILL   m   German
From Tielo, a Medieval Low German diminutive of names that began with Diet (for example DIETRICH), originally from Germanic theud meaning "people".
TILLO   m   German (Rare)
Variant of TILO.
TILO   m   German
From Tielo, a Low German diminutive of names that began with Diet (for example DIETRICH), from the Germanic element theud meaning "people". Saint Tillo was a 7th-century man of Saxony who was kidnapped and brought to the Low Countries by raiders. After his release he became a Benedictine monk and did missionary work in France.
TIM   m   English, German, Dutch, Slovene, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Short form of TIMOTHY. It was borne by the fictional character Tiny Tim, the ill son of Bob Cratchit in Charles Dickens' novel 'A Christmas Carol' (1843).
TIMO (1)   m   Finnish, German, Dutch
Finnish, German and Dutch short form of Timotheus (see TIMOTHY).
TIMO (2)   m   German, Dutch
From Thiemo, an old short form of Thietmar (see DIETMAR).
TIMOTHEUS   m   Biblical Latin, German, Dutch
Latinized form of Timotheos (see TIMOTHY).
TOBIAS   m   Biblical, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of TOBIAH. This is the name of the hero of the apocryphal Book of Tobit, which appears in many English versions of the Old Testament. It relates how Tobit's son Tobias, with the help of the angel Raphael, is able to drive away a demon who has plagued Sarah, who subsequently becomes his wife. This story was popular in the Middle Ages, and the name came into occasional use in parts of Europe at that time. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation.
TORBEN   m   Danish, German
Danish form of TORBJÖRN.
TORSTEN   m   Swedish, Danish, German
From the Old Norse name Þórsteinn, which meant "Thor's stone" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with steinn "stone".
TRAUGOTT   m   German
Derived from German trau "trust" and Gott "God". This name was created in the 17th century.
UDO (1)   m   German
Newer form of Odo (see OTTO).
UELI   m   German (Swiss)
Swiss diminutive of ULRICH.
ULLI   m & f   German
Diminutive of ULRICH or ULRIKE.
ULRICH   m   German, French, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Odalric meaning "prosperity and power", from the element odal "heritage" combined with ric "power". It has long been confused with the Germanic name Hulderic. This was the name of two German saints. Another famous bearer was Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531), also known as Huldrych, the leader of the Protestant Reformation in Switzerland.
URBAN   m   Danish, Swedish, German, Polish, Slovene, Biblical, History
From the Latin name Urbanus which meant "city dweller". This name is mentioned briefly in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. It was subsequently borne by eight popes.
URS   m   German
German form of the Latin name Ursus, which meant "bear". Saint Ursus was a 3rd-century soldier in the Theban Legion who was martyred with Saint Victor. He is the patron saint of Solothurn in Switzerland.
UTZ   m   German
Diminutive of ULRICH.
UWE   m   German
German form of OVE.
VEIT   m   German
German form of VITUS or WIDO.
VINZENT   m   German
German form of VINCENT.
VINZENZ   m   German
German form of VINCENT.
VOLKER   m   German
Derived from the Germanic element fulc "people" combined with hari "army".
WALDEMAR   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish
Germanic derivative of the Slavic name VLADIMIR (or perhaps a cognate composed of the Germanic elements wald "rule" and meri "famous"). It was introduced into Scandinavia by the 12th-century Danish king Waldemar (or Valdemar) who was named after a royal ancestor of his Ukrainian mother.
WALDO   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names containing the element wald meaning "rule". In the Middle Ages this name became the basis for a surname. Its present use in the English-speaking world is usually in honour of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism. He was (probably) named after the 12th-century Christian radical Peter Waldo, who was from Lyons in France. Though Waldo and his followers, called the Waldensians, were declared heretics at the time, they were later admired by Protestants.
WALTER   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote 'Ivanhoe' and other notable works.
WALTHER   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of WALTER. This name was borne by the 13th-century German poet Walther von der Vogelweide.
WENDEL   m   German, Dutch
Old short form of Germanic names beginning with the element Wandal meaning "a Vandal". The Vandals were a Germanic tribe who invaded Spain and North Africa in the 5th century. The tribal name was later applied to other groups such as the Wends, a Slavic people living between the Elbe and the Oder.
WENDELIN   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Old diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element Wandal (see WENDEL). Saint Wendelin was a 6th-century hermit of Trier in Germany.
WENZEL   m   German
Medieval German form of VÁCLAV, via the Latinized form Venceslaus.
WENZESLAUS   m   German
German form of VÁCLAV, via the Latinized form Venceslaus.
WERNER   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From a Germanic name derived from warin "guard" combined with hari "army".
WERTHER   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements wert "worthy" and hari "army". Goethe used this name in his novel 'The Sorrows of Young Werther' (1774).
WESSEL   m   Frisian, Dutch, German
Diminutive of WERNER.
WETZEL   m   German
Diminutive of WERNER.
WIEBE   m   Frisian, Dutch, German
Medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element wig meaning "war".
WIEGAND   m   German (Rare)
Modern German form of WIGAND.
WIELAND   m   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements wela possibly meaning "skill" and land meaning "land". In Germanic mythology Wieland (called Völundr in Old Norse) was an unequaled smith and craftsman.
WILFRIED   m   German
German cognate of WILFRED.
WILHELM   m   German, Polish, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of WILLIAM. This was the name of two German Emperors. It was also the middle name of several philosophers from Germany: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831), Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900), and Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (1646-1716), who was also a notable mathematician.
WILLI   m   German
Diminutive of WILHELM.
WILLY   m & f   English, German, Dutch
Diminutive of WILLIAM, WILHELM or WILLEM. It is both masculine and feminine in Dutch.
WIM   m   Dutch, German
Dutch and German short form of WILLEM or WILHELM.
WINFRIED   m   German
German form of WINFRED.
WITOLD   m   Polish, German
Polish form of VYTAUTAS. Alternatively it could be derived from the Germanic name WIDALD.
WOLF   m   German, Jewish, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Short form of WOLFGANG, WOLFRAM or other names containing the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf". It can also be simply from the German or English word.
WOLFGANG   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wulf meaning "wolf" and gang "path". Two famous bearers of this name were Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) and German novelist and poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832).
WOLFRAM   m   German
Derived from the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf" combined with hramn "raven".
WULF   m   German
Variant of WOLF.
XAVER   m   German
German form of XAVIER.
YVO   m   German, Dutch
Variant of IVO (1).
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