Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the usage is Native American.
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AHTAHKAKOOP   m   Native American, Cree
Means "star blanket" in Cree. This was the name of an early 19th-century Cree chief.
AMARU   m   Native American, Aymara
Means "snake" in Aymara.
AMEYALLI   f & m   Native American, Nahuatl
Means "spring, fountain" in Nahuatl.
ANTIMAN   m   Native American, Mapuche
Means "condor of the sun" in Mapuche.
ANTINANCO   m   Native American, Mapuche
Means "eagle of the sun" in Mapuche.
APUTSIAQ   m   Native American, Greenlandic
Means "snowflake" in Greenlandic.
AQISSIAQ   m   Native American, Greenlandic
Means "ptarmigan" in Greenlandic (a ptarmigan is a type of bird which lives in cold regions).
ASHKII   m   Native American, Navajo
Means "boy" in Navajo.
AUCAMAN   m   Native American, Mapuche
Means "wild condor" in Mapuche.
BAISHAN   m   Native American, Apache
Means "knife" in Apache. This was the name of a 19th-century chief of the Chiricahua Apache.
BALAM   m   Native American, Mayan
Means "jaguar" in Mayan.
BIDZIIL   m   Native American, Navajo
Means "he is strong" in Navajo.
BIRA   m   Native American, Tupi
Short form of UBIRAJARA.
CATAHECASSA   m   Native American, Shawnee
Means "black hoof" in Shawnee. This was the name of a Shawnee warrior and chief of the 18th century.
CAUÃ   m   Native American, Tupi
Means "hawk" in Tupi.
CITLALI   f & m   Native American, Nahuatl
Means "star" in Nahuatl.
CITLALLI   f & m   Native American, Nahuatl
Variant of CITLALI.
COCHISE   m   Native American, Apache
From Apache chis meaning "oak, wood". This was the name of a 19th-century chief of the Chiricahua Apache.
COWESSESS   m   Native American, Ojibwe
From Ojibwe Ka-we-zauce meaning "little child". This was the name of a late 19th-century chief of the Saulteaux.
CUAUHTÉMOC   m   Native American, Nahuatl
Means "falling eagle" in Nahuatl. This was the name of the last Aztec emperor, ruling until he was captured and executed by the Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés in the year 1525.
EHECATL   m   Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Native American, Nahuatl
Means "wind" in Nahuatl. Ehecatl was the name of the Aztec wind god.
GOYATHLAY   m   Native American, Apache
Means "one who yawns" in Apache. This was the real name of the Apache leader Geronimo (1829-1909), who fought against Mexican and American expansion into his territory.
HIAWATHA   m   History, Native American, Iroquois
From the Iroquoian name Haio-went-ha meaning "he who combs". This was the name of a Mohawk or Onondaga leader who founded the Iroquois Confederacy, possibly in the 15th century. He was later the subject of a fictionalized 1855 poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.
HOKOLESQUA   m   Native American, Shawnee
Means "cornstalk" in Shawnee. This was the name of an 18th-century Shawnee chief.
INTI   m   Native American, Quechua, Incan Mythology
Means "sun" in Quechua. This was the name of the Inca god of the sun.
ISI   m & f   Native American, Choctaw
Means "deer" in Choctaw.
JACI (2)   f & m   Native American, Tupi
From Tupi îasy meaning "moon".
KANEONUSKATEW   m   Native American, Cree
Means "one that walks on four claws" in Cree. This was the name of a 19th-century Cree chief.
KAWACATOOSE   m   Native American, Cree
Means "poor man" or "lean man" in Cree. This was the name of a 19th-century Cree chief.
KISECAWCHUCK   m   Native American, Cree
Means "daystar" in Cree. This was the name of a 19th-century Cree chief.
LALAWETHIKA   m   Native American, Shawnee
Means "he makes noise" in Shawnee. This was another name of the Shawnee leader Tenskwatawa (1775-1836).
MAHPIYA   m   Native American, Sioux
Means "cloud, sky" in Dakota and Lakota. This is the first part of the names of the Dakota chief Mahpiya Wicasta (1780-1863), known as Cloud Man, and the Lakota chiefs Mahpiya Luta (1822-1909), known as Red Cloud, and Mahpiya Iyapato (1838-1905), known as Touch the Clouds.
MALIK (2)   m   Native American, Greenlandic
Means "wave" in Greenlandic.
MAQUINNA   m   Native American, Nuu-chah-nulth
Meaning unknown, of Nuu-chah-nulth (also known as Nootka) origin. This was the name of a late 18th-century chief of the Mowachaht.
MEZTLI   m & f   Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Native American, Nahuatl
Means "moon" in Nahuatl. This was the name of the Aztec god (or goddess) of the moon.
MOACIR   m   Native American, Tupi
Possibly means "son of pain" in Tupi. This is the name of the son of Iracema and Martim in the novel 'Iracema' (1865) by José de Alencar.
MUSCOWEQUAN   m   Native American, Cree
Means "hard quill" in Cree. This was the name of a 19th-century Cree chief.
NAHUEL   m   Native American, Mapuche
Means "jaguar" in Mapuche.
NAICHE   m   Native American, Apache
Means "mischief maker" in Apache. This name was borne by a 19th-century Chiricahua Apache chief, the son of Cochise.
NANOOK   m   Native American, Inuit
Variant of NANUQ. This was the (fictional) name of the subject of Robert Flaherty's documentary film 'Nanook of the North' (1922).
NANUK   m   Native American, Inuit
Variant of NANUQ.
NANUQ   m   Native American, Inuit
Means "polar bear" in Inuktitut.
NOTAH   m   Native American, Navajo
Means "almost there" in Navajo.
NUKA   m & f   Native American, Greenlandic
Means "younger sibling" in Greenlandic.
ODESERUNDIYE   m   Native American, Mohawk
Means "lightning has struck" in Mohawk. This was the name of an 18th-century Mohawk chief, also called John Deseronto.
OHIYESA   m   Native American, Sioux
Means "winner" in Dakota and Lakota.
OJIGKWANONG   m   Native American, Algonquin
Means "morning star" in Alqonguin.
ONANGWATGO   m   Native American, Oneida
Means "big medicine" in Oneida. This was the name of a chief of the Oneida people, also named Cornelius Hill (1834-1907).
POTSɄNAKWAHIPɄ   m   Native American, Comanche
Means "buffalo hump" in Comanche. This name was borne by a 19th-century war chief of the Penateka Comanche.
QILLAQ   m   Native American, Greenlandic
Means "seal hide" in Greenlandic.
QUANAH   m   Native American, Comanche
Means "fragrant" in Comanche. This was the name of a 19th-century chief of the Comanche.
QUIDEL   m   Native American, Mapuche
Means "burning torch" in Mapuche.
SEQUOYAH   m   Native American, Cherokee
Possibly from Cherokee siqua meaning "hog". This was the name of the Cherokee man (also known as George Guess) who devised the Cherokee writing system in the 19th century.
SHÁŃDÍÍN   f & m   Native American, Navajo
Means "sunshine" in Navajo.
SHIKOBA   m & f   Native American, Choctaw
Means "feather" in Choctaw.
SKENANDOA   m   Native American, Oneida
Probably from the name of the Shenandoah River in the eastern United States, which is of uncertain origin. This was the name of an 18th-century Oneida chief.
TALAKO   m   Native American, Choctaw
Means "eagle" in Choctaw.
TASUNKA   m   Native American, Sioux
From Lakota tȟašuŋke meaning "his horse". This forms the first part of the name of Tasunka Witko (1840-1877), translated as Crazy Horse, a Lakota war leader.
TATANKA   m   Native American, Sioux
From Lakota tȟatȟáŋka meaning "bull". This is the first part of the name of the Lakota holy man and chief Tatanka Iyotake (1831-1890), translated into English as Sitting Bull.
TECUMSEH   m   Native American, Shawnee
Means "panther passing across" in Shawnee. This was the name of a Shawnee leader who, with his brother Tenskwatawa, resisted European expansion in the early 19th century.
TENSKWATAWA   m   Native American, Shawnee
Means "open door" in Shawnee. This was the name of a Shawnee prophet. With his brother Tecumseh he led his people in resistance against European expansion in the early 19th century.
TESSOUAT   m   Native American, Algonquin
Meaning unknown. This was the name of several 17th-century Algonquin chiefs.
TIRIAQ   m   Native American, Inuit
Means "ermine" in Inuktitut.
TLALOC   m   Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Native American, Nahuatl
Means "of the earth" in Nahuatl. He was the Aztec god of rain and fertility, the husband of Chalchiuhticue.
TOSAHWI   m   Native American, Comanche
Means "white knife" in Comanche. This name was borne by a 19th-century Penateka Comanche chief.
UBIRAJARA   m   Native American, Tupi
Means "lord of the spear" in Tupi. This is the name of an 1874 novel by José de Alencar.
UJARAK   m   Native American, Inuit
Means "rock" in Inuktitut.
WAHUNSENACAWH   m   Native American, Powhatan
Meaning unknown. This name was borne by a 17th-century chief of the Powhatan people. He was also known as Powhatan, as a result of confusion between his name and his birthplace.
WAMAN   m   Native American, Quechua
Means "eagle, falcon" in Quechua.
WAPASHA   m   Native American, Sioux
Means "red leaf" in Dakota. This was the name of several Dakota chiefs.
WAWATAM   m   Native American, Ojibwe
Means "little goose" in Ojibwe. This was the name of an 18th-century chief of the Ottawa people.
WAYNA   m   Native American, Quechua
Means "young" in Quechua.
WAYRA   m   Native American, Quechua
Means "wind" in Quechua.
WICKANINNISH   m   Native American, Nuu-chah-nulth
Possibly means "having no one in front of him in the canoe" in the Nuu-chah-nulth (or Nootka) language. This was the name of a chief of the Clayoquot in the late 18th century, at the time of European contact.
WILLKA   m   Native American, Aymara
Means "sun" in Aymara.
XOCHIPILLI   m   Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Native American, Nahuatl
Means "flower prince" in Nahuatl. He was the Aztec god of love, flowers, song and games, the twin brother of Xochiquetzal.
XQUENDA   m & f   Native American, Zapotec
Means "spirit, soul, essence" in Zapotec.
YAXKIN   m   Native American, Mayan
Means "sun" in Mayan.
YOLOTL   f & m   Native American, Nahuatl
Means "heart" in Nahuatl.
YOLOTLI   f & m   Native American, Nahuatl
Variant of YOLOTL.
YUNUEN   m & f   Native American, Mayan
Possibly means "half moon" in Mayan. This is the name of an island on Lake Pátzcuaro in Mexico.
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