Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is masculine; and the usage is Serbian.
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ACAmSerbian, Macedonian
Serbian and Macedonian diminutive of ALEKSANDAR.
ACOmMacedonian, Serbian
Macedonian and Serbian diminutive of ALEKSANDAR.
ADAMmEnglish, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Catalan, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew
This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make".... [more]
ALJOŠAmSlovene, Croatian, Serbian
Slovene, Croatian and Serbian form of ALYOSHA.
ANĐELKOmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of ANGEL.
ANDREJA (2)mSerbian
Serbian form of ANDREW.
ANDRIJAmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of ANDREW.
ANTOmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ANTONIJEmSerbian
Serbian form of Antonius (see ANTHONY).
ATANASIJEmSerbian
Serbian form of ATHANASIUS.
BLAGOJEmSerbian, Croatian
Serbian and Croatian form of BLAGOY.
BOGDANmPolish, Russian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Romanian, Medieval Slavic
Means "given by God" from the Slavic elements bogu "god" and dan "given".
BOJANmSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Derived from the Slavic element boji meaning "battle". This was the name of a 9th-century Bulgarian saint.
BORISmBulgarian, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Georgian, German
From the Turkic name Bogoris, perhaps meaning "short" or "wolf" or "snow leopard". It was borne by the 9th-century King Boris I of Bulgaria who converted his country to Christianity, as well as two later Bulgarian emperors. The name was popularized in the Slavic world due to the 11th-century Saint Boris, who was a Russian prince martyred with his brother Gleb. His mother may have been Bulgarian. Another famous bearer was the 16th-century Russian emperor Boris Godunov, later the subject of a play of that name by Aleksandr Pushkin.
BORISLAVmBulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element borti "battle" combined with slava "glory".
BORIVOJmSerbian, Croatian
Serbian and Croatian form of BOŘIVOJ.
BORIVOJEmSerbian
Serbian form of BOŘIVOJ.
BORKOmCroatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Derived from the Slavic element borti meaning "fight, battle".
BOROmCroatian, Serbian
Diminutive of BORISLAV or BORIS.
BOŽAmSerbian
Diminutive of BOŽIDAR.
BOŽIDARmSerbian, Croatian, Slovene
Means "divine gift" from the Slavic elements bozy "divine" and daru "gift".
BOŽOmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene
Originally a diminutive of BOŽIDAR and other names beginning with the Slavic element bozy meaning "divine".
BRANIMIRmCroatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovene
Derived from the Slavic element borna "protection" combined with miru meaning "peace, world".
BRATISLAVmSerbian
Derived from the Slavic elements bratu "brother" and slava "glory".
ČEDOMIRmSerbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Derived from the Slavic elements chedo meaning "child" and miru meaning "peace, world".
DALIBORmCzech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dali meaning "distance" and borti meaning "to fight".
DAMIRmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene
Possibly derived from the Slavic elements dan "given" and miru "peace, world". Otherwise, it might be of Turkic origin.
DAMJANmSlovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Slovene, Croatian, Serbian and Macedonian form of DAMIAN.
DARKOmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of names containing the Slavic element daru meaning "gift".
DAVIDmEnglish, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
DAVORmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene
Possibly from an old Slavic exclamation expressing joy or sorrow.
DEJANmSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Possibly derived from the South Slavic word dejati meaning "to act, to do". Otherwise it may be related to Latin deus "god".
DIMITRIJEmSerbian
Serbian form of DEMETRIUS.
DJORDJEmSerbian
Variant transcription of ĐORĐE.
DJURADJmSerbian
Variant transcription of ĐURAĐ.
DJUROmSerbian
Variant transcription of ĐURO.
DMITARmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of DEMETRIUS.
DOBROSLAVmCroatian, Serbian, Czech, Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dobru "good" and slava "glory".
ĐORĐEmSerbian
Serbian form of GEORGE.
DRAGANmSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Bulgarian
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious".
DRAGOmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious". It is also a short form of other Slavic names beginning with that element.
DRAGOMIRmSerbian, Croatian, Romanian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious" combined with miru meaning "peace, world".
DRAGOSLAVmSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements dragu meaning "precious" and slava "glory".
DRAGUTINmSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious".
DRAŠKOmSerbian, Croatian
Diminutive of names containing the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious".
DRAŽENmCroatian, Serbian
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious".
DUBRAVKOmCroatian, Serbian
From the old Slavic word dubrava meaning "oak grove".
ĐUROmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of GEORGE.
DUŠANmCzech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovak, Slovene, Macedonian
Derived from Slavic dusha meaning "soul, spirit".
EMILmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Romanian, Bulgarian, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Hungarian, Icelandic, English
From the Roman family name Aemilius, which was derived from Latin aemulus meaning "rival".
FRANJOmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of FRANCIS.
GAVRILOmSerbian
Serbian form of GABRIEL.
GORANmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Bulgarian (Rare)
Means "mountain man", derived from South Slavic gora "mountain". It was popularized by the Croatian poet Ivan Goran Kovačić (1913-1943), who got his middle name because of the mountain town where he was born.
GORDANmSerbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Derived from South Slavic gord meaning "dignified". This name and the feminine form Gordana were popularized by the publication of Croatian author Marija Jurić Zagorka's novel 'Gordana' (1935).
IGORmRussian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Russian form of Yngvarr (see INGVAR). The Varangians brought it to Russia in the 10th century. It was borne by two grand princes of Kiev. Famous bearers include Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971), a Russian composer whose most famous work is 'The Rite of Spring', and Igor Sikorsky (1889-1972), the Russian-American designer of the first successful helicopter.
ILIJAmMacedonian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian
Macedonian, Serbian and Croatian form of ELIJAH, and a Bulgarian variant transcription of ILIYA.
ISAIJAmSerbian, Macedonian
Serbian and Macedonian form of ISAIAH.
IVANmRussian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Macedonian, Slovene, English, Italian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote 'Fathers and Sons', and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.
IVICAmCroatian, Serbian
Diminutive of IVAN.
JADRANmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene
Croatian, Serbian and Slovene form of ADRIAN.
JADRANKOmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene
Croatian, Serbian and Slovene form of ADRIAN.
JAKOVmSerbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Serbian, Croatian and Macedonian form of JACOB (or JAMES).
JAKŠAmCroatian, Serbian
Diminutive of JAKOV.
JAVORmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene
Means "maple tree" in South Slavic.
JEVREMmSerbian
Serbian form of EPHRAIM.
JOAKIMmSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Serbian, Macedonian
Scandinavian, Macedonian and Serbian form of JOACHIM.
JOSIFmSerbian, Macedonian
Serbian and Macedonian form of JOSEPH.
JOVANmSerbian, Macedonian
Serbian and Macedonian form of JOHN.
KRISTIJANmSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Serbian, Croatian, Slovene and Macedonian form of CHRISTIAN.
KUZMANmBulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian
Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian form of COSMAS.
LAZARmRussian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian form of LAZARUS.
LJUBANmSerbian, Croatian
Serbian and Croatian form of LYUBEN.
LJUBOMIRmCroatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Croatian, Serbian and Macedonian form of LUBOMÍR.
MARINmFrench, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
French, Romanian, Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian and Macedonian form of MARINUS.
MARINKOmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian diminutive of MARIN.
MARJAN (2)mSlovene, Macedonian, Serbian, Croatian
Slovene, Macedonian, Serbian and Croatian form of MARIANUS.
MATEJA (2)mSerbian
Serbian variant of MATIJA.
MATIJAm & fSlovene, Croatian, Serbian
Slovene, Croatian and Serbian form of MATTHIAS, used to refer to the apostle chosen to replace Judas Iscariot. It is occasionally used as a feminine name.
MIHAILOmSerbian
Serbian form of MICHAEL.
MIHAJLOmSerbian
Serbian form of MICHAEL.
MIJOmCroatian, Serbian
Diminutive of MILAN or MIHOVIL.
MILANmCzech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Dutch, Hungarian
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear", originally a short form of names that began with that element. A city in Italy bears this name, though it originates from a different source.
MILEmCroatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MILENKOmSerbian, Croatian
Serbian and Croatian diminutive of MILAN.
MILIVOJmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements milu "gracious" and voji "soldier".
MILOJEmSerbian
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear", originally a diminutive of names that began with that element.
MILOJICAmSerbian
Diminutive of MILOJE.
MILORADmSerbian, Croatian
Derived from the Slavic elements milu "gracious, dear" and rad "happy, willing".
MILOŠmCzech, Slovak, Serbian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of names beginning with the Slavic element milu "gracious, dear". This was the name of a 14th-century Serbian hero who apparently killed the Ottoman sultan Murad I at the Battle of Kosovo.
MILOVANmSerbian
From Serbian миловати (milovati) meaning "to caress".
MIODRAGmSerbian, Croatian
Derived from the element mio, a Serbo-Croatian form of the Slavic element milu meaning "dear", combined with dragu meaning "precious".
MIRKOmSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Italian
Originally a diminutive of MIROSLAV and other names containing the element miru "peace, world".
MIROSLAVmCzech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements miru "peace, world" and slava "glory". This was the name of a 10th-century king of Croatia who was deposed by one of his nobles after ruling for four years.
MIŠAm & fSerbian, Slovene
Serbian diminutive of MIHAILO, MIROSLAV and other names beginning with a similar sound. In Slovenia it is typically feminine.
MIŠKOmSerbian, Croatian
Serbian and Croatian diminutive of MIHAILO, MIHAEL, MIROSLAV and other names beginning with a similar sound.
MLADENmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Derived from the Slavic word младъ (mladu) meaning "young".
NEBOJŠAmSerbian, Croatian
Means "fearless" in Serbian and Croatian.
NEDELJKOmCroatian, Serbian
Derived from Croatian nedjelja and Serbian недеља (nedelja) meaning "Sunday".
NEMANJAmSerbian
Possibly from Slavic ne maniti meaning "not deceiving, not luring, not attracting". Another theory states that it means "without possessions", derived from Serbo-Croatian nemati meaning "have not". This was the name of a 12th-century Serbian king, and the name of the dynasty he began.
NENADmSerbian, Croatian
Means "unexpected" in Serbian and Croatian. In the Serbian folk song 'Predrag and Nenad' this is the name of Predrag's brother.
NENOmSerbian, Croatian
Diminutive of NENAD.
NEVENmCroatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Masculine form of NEVENA.
NIKICAmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian diminutive of NIKOLA (1).
NINOSLAVmSerbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
From a Slavic element, possibly nyni "now", combined with slava "glory".
NOVAKmSerbian
From Serbian нов (nov) meaning "new".
OBRADmSerbian
Possibly derived from Serbian obradovati "to make happy".
OGNJANmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian variant form of OGNYAN.
OGNJENmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of OGNYAN.
OLIVERmEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
PAVLEmSerbian, Macedonian, Croatian, Georgian
Serbian, Macedonian, Croatian and Georgian form of PAUL.
PEĐAmSerbian
Diminutive of PREDRAG.
PEDJAmSerbian
Variant transcription of PEĐA.
PEJOmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian diminutive of PETAR.
PERICAmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian diminutive of PETAR.
PETARmSerbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian and Macedonian form of PETER.
PLAMENmBulgarian, Serbian
Derived from South Slavic plamen meaning "flame, fire".
PREDRAGmSerbian, Croatian
Derived from the Slavic element dragu meaning "precious" combined with a superlative prefix.
RADEmSerbian, Croatian
Originally a diminutive of MILORAD and other Slavic names containing the element rad meaning "happy, willing".
RADMILOmSerbian
Serbian form of RADOMIL.
RADOMIRmSerbian, Bulgarian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element rad "happy, willing" combined with meru "great, famous" or miru "peace, world".
RADOVANmSlovak, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element rad "happy, willing" combined with another element of unknown meaning.
RANKOmSerbian, Croatian
Derived from the Slavic word ранъ (ranu) meaning "early".
RATKOmCroatian, Serbian
Diminutive of names beginning with the Slavic element rati meaning "war, battle".
RATOMIRmSerbian
Serbian form of RATIMIR.
SAŠAm & fCroatian, Serbian, Slovene
Croatian, Serbian and Slovene diminutive of ALEKSANDER or ALEKSANDRA.
SAVAmSerbian, Bulgarian
Serbian and Bulgarian form of SABAS.
SIMEONmBiblical, Bulgarian, Serbian
From Συμεων (Symeon), the Old Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Shim'on (see SIMON (1)). In the Old Testament this is the name of the second son of Jacob and Leah and the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. In the New Testament the Greek rendering Σιμων (Simon) is more common, though Συμεων occurs belonging to a man who blessed the newborn Jesus. He is recognized as a saint in most Christian traditions.... [more]
SIMOmFinnish, Serbian
Finnish and Serbian form of SIMON (1).
SINIŠAmCroatian, Serbian
Derived from Serbo-Croatian sin meaning "son".
SLAVENmCroatian, Serbian
Derived from Slavic slava meaning "glory".
SLAVKOmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Macedonian, Bulgarian (Rare)
Derived from Slavic slava meaning "glory".
SLAVOMIRmCroatian, Serbian, Medieval Slavic
Croatian and Serbian form of SŁAWOMIR.
SLOBODANmSerbian, Macedonian, Croatian
From South Slavic sloboda meaning "freedom".
SPIRIDONmGreek, Serbian, Croatian
Serian and Croatian form of SPYRIDON, as well as a variant transcription of the Greek name.
SREĆKOmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian cognate of SREČKO.
STANIMIRmBulgarian, Serbian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements stani "stand, become" and miru "peace, world".
STANISLAVmCzech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Slovene, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements stani meaning "stand, become" combined with slava meaning "glory".
STEVANmSerbian, Croatian
Serbian and Croatian form of STEPHEN.
STEVOmSerbian, Croatian
Diminutive of STEVAN.
STJEPANmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of STEPHEN.
STOJANmMacedonian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene
Macedonian, Serbian, Croatian and Slovene form of STOYAN.
SVETOMIRmSerbian, Bulgarian
Serbian and Bulgarian form of ŚWIĘTOMIERZ.
TADIJAmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of THADDEUS.
TIHOMIRmCroatian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian
Derived from the Slavic elements tikhu "quiet" and miru "peace, world".
TODORmBulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian
Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian form of THEODORE.
TOMISLAVmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Probably derived from the Slavic element tomiti meaning "torture" combined with slava meaning "glory". This was the name of the first king of Croatia (10th century).
UROSmSerbian
Variant transcription of UROŠ.
UROŠmSerbian, Slovene
Serbian form of an old Hungarian name, possibly from úr meaning "man, lord" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of five Serbian kings.
VANJAm & fCroatian, Serbian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Croatian and Serbian (masculine and feminine) form of VANYA. It is also used in Scandinavia, where it is primarily feminine.
VASILIJEmSerbian
Serbian form of BASIL (1).
VEDRANmCroatian, Serbian
Means "clear, cheerful" in Croatian and Serbian.
VELIBORmSerbian, Croatian
Derived from the Slavic elements veli "great" and borti "battle".
VELIMIRmCroatian, Serbian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements veli "great" and miru "peace, world".
VESELINmBulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian
Derived from South Slavic vesel meaning "cheerful".
VESELKOmCroatian, Serbian
Derived from South Slavic vesel meaning "cheerful".
VIKENTIJEmSerbian
Serbian form of VINCENT.
VITOMIRmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vit "master, lord" and miru "peace, world".
VLADANmSerbian, Czech, Slovak
Short form of Slavic names beginning with the element vladeti meaning "rule".
VLADIMIRmRussian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element vladeti "rule" combined with meru "great, famous". The second element has also been associated with miru meaning "peace, world". This was the name of an 11th-century grand prince of Kiev who is venerated as a saint because of his efforts to Christianize his realm (Kievan Rus). It was also borne by the founder of the former Soviet state, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924).
VLADISLAVmRussian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vladeti "rule" and slava "glory".
VLADOmCroatian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Short form of VLADIMIR and other Slavic names beginning with the element vladeti meaning "rule".
VLASTIMIRmSerbian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vlasti meaning "rule, sovereignty" and miru meaning "peace, world".
VUKmSerbian
Means "wolf" in Serbian.
VUKAŠINmSerbian
Derived from Serbian vuk "wolf". This was the name of a 14th-century Serbian ruler.
ŽARKOmSerbian, Croatian
Derived from Serbian and Croatian žar meaning "ember, zeal, fervour".
ZDRAVKOmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Derived from South Slavic zdrav meaning "healthy".
ŽELIMIRmCroatian, Serbian
Derived from the Slavic elements zheleti "to wish, to desire" and miru "peace, world".
ŽELJKOmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene
Derived from South Slavic želja meaning "desire".
ŽIVKOmCroatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of ZHIVKO.
ZLATANmCroatian, Serbian, Bosnian, Macedonian, Bulgarian, Slovene
Means "golden", a derivative of the Slavic word zlato "gold".
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