Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is unisex; and the origin is Old English.
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AINSLEY   f & m   Scottish, English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ALDUS   m & f   Medieval English
Medieval variant of ALDOUS.
ASH   m & f   English
Short form of ASHLEY. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.
ASHLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.
ASTON   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from either a place name meaning "east town" in Old English or from the given name ÆÐELSTAN.
AVERILL   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
AVERY   m & f   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
BEVERLY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's novel 'Beverly of Graustark' (1904).
BROOK   m & f   English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived near a brook.
DUDA   m & f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO or EDUARDA.
EDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
FREDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of FREDERICK or FREDA.
HARLEY   m & f   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HILDRED   f & m   English
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel". This name was revived in the late 19th century, probably because of its similarity to the popular names Hilda and Mildred.
HUNTER   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
KIM (1)   f & m   English
At the present it is usually considered a short form of KIMBERLY, but it in fact predates it as a given name. The author Rudyard Kipling used it for the title hero of his novel 'Kim' (1901), though in this case it was short for KIMBALL. In her novel 'Show Boat' (1926) Edna Ferber used it for a female character who was born on the Mississippi River and was named from the initials of the states Kentucky, Illinois and Mississippi. The name was popularized in America by the actresses Kim Hunter (1922-2002) and Kim Novak (1933-), both of whom assumed it as a stage name.
LEE   m & f   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. In his honour, it has been commonly used as a given name in the American South.
LEIGH   f & m   English
From a surname which was a variant of LEE.
MONET   f & m   Various
From a French surname which was derived from either HAMON or EDMOND. This was the surname of the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
PAYTON   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of PEYTON.
PEYTON   m & f   English
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "PÆGA's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress. It is also borne by American football quarterback Peyton Manning (1976-).
PRESLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest clearing" (Old English preost and leah). This surname was borne by musician Elvis Presley (1935-1977).
PUCK   m & f   Anglo-Saxon Mythology, Dutch
Meaning unknown, from Old English puca. It could ultimately be of either Germanic or Celtic origin. In English legend this was the name of a mischievous spirit, also known as Robin Goodfellow. He appears in Shakespeare's play 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1600).
STORM   m & f   English (Modern), Danish, Norwegian
From the vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English storm, or in the case of the Scandinavian name, from Old Norse stormr.
WHITNEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "white island" in Old English. Its popular use as a feminine name was initiated by actress Whitney Blake (1925-2002) in the 1960s, and further boosted in the 1980s by singer Whitney Houston (1963-2012).
WIL   m & f   English, Dutch
Short form of WILLIAM and other names beginning with Wil.
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