Names Starting with M

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MIKLÓSmHungarian
Hungarian form of NICHOLAS.
MIKOŁAJmPolish
Polish form of NICHOLAS.
MIKOLÁŠmCzech
Czech form of NICHOLAS.
MIKSAmHungarian
Originally a diminutive of MIKLÓS or MIHÁLY. It is now used independently, or as a Hungarian form of MAXIMILIAN.
MIKUfJapanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" combined with (ku) meaning "sky" or (ku) meaning "long time". It can also come from a nanori reading of 未来 (mirai) meaning "future". Other kanji combinations are possible as well.
MIKULÁŠmSlovak, Czech
Slovak and Czech form of NICHOLAS.
MI-KYUNGfKorean
Variant transcription of MI-GYEONG.
MILAfRussian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MILADAfCzech
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear". It has become associated with Czech mladý "young".
MILAGROSfSpanish
Means "miracles" in Spanish. It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de los Milagros, which means "Our Lady of Miracles".
MILÁNmHungarian
Hungarian form of MILAN.
MILANmCzech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Dutch, Hungarian
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear", originally a short form of names that began with that element. A city in Italy bears this name, though it originates from a different source.
MILANKAfSerbian, Croatian
Feminine form of MILAN.
MILBURGAfHistory
Derived from the Old English elements milde "gentle" and burg "fortress". Saint Milburga, the sister of Saint Mildred, was a daughter of a 7th-century Mercian king. She was supposedly in possession of magical powers.
MILBURNmEnglish
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "mill stream" in Old English.
MILDAfLithuanian, Baltic Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the Lithuanian goddess of love.
MILDBURGfAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of MILBURGA.
MILDGYÐfAnglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements milde "gentle" and gyð "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century saint, the sister of Saint Mildred.
MILDREDfEnglish
From the Old English name Mildþryð meaning "gentle strength", derived from the elements milde "gentle" and þryð "strength". Saint Mildred was a 7th-century abbess, the daughter of the Kentish princess Saint Ermenburga. After the Norman conquest this name became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
MILDÞRYÐfAnglo-Saxon
Old English form of MILDRED.
MILEmCroatian, Serbian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MILENmBulgarian
Variant of MILAN.
MILÉNAfHungarian
Hungarian form of MILENA.
MILENAfBulgarian, Czech, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Polish, Russian, Italian
Feminine form of MILAN. It began to be used in Italy in honour of Milena Vukotić (1847-1923), mother of Helen of Montenegro, the wife of the Italian king Victor Emmanuel III. In Italy it can also be considered a combination of MARIA and ELENA.
MILENKOmSerbian, Croatian
Serbian and Croatian diminutive of MILAN.
MILESmEnglish
From the Germanic name Milo, introduced by the Normans to England in the form Miles. The meaning is not known for certain. It is possibly connected to the Slavic name element milu meaning "gracious". From an early date it was associated with Latin miles "soldier".
MILEYfEnglish (Modern)
In the case of actress and singer Miley Cyrus (1992-), it is a shortened form of the nickname Smiley, given to her by her father because she often smiled. Although it was not at all common before she brought it to public attention, there are some examples of its use before her time, most likely as a diminutive of MILES.
MILFORDmEnglish
From an English surname which was originally derived from various place names all meaning "ford by a mill" in Old English.
MILICAfSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious". It was originally a diminutive of names that began with that element.
MILITSAfMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of MILICA.
MILIVOJmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements milu "gracious" and voji "soldier".
MILJANAfSerbian
Feminine form of MILAN.
MILJENKOmCroatian
Croatian diminutive of MILAN.
MILKA (1)fSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Bulgarian
Diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MILKA (2)fBiblical
Means "queen" in Hebrew. This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to both the wife of Nahor and the daughter of Zelophehad.
MILKOmBulgarian
Diminutive of Slavic names containing the element milu "gracious, dear".
MILLAfSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Short form of CAMILLA and other names that end in milla.
MILLARAYfNative American, Mapuche
Means "golden flower" in Mapuche.
MILLARDmEnglish
From an occupational English surname which meant "guardian of the mill" in Old English.
MILLICENTfEnglish
From the Germanic name Amalasuintha, composed of the elements amal "work, labour" and swinth "strong". Amalasuintha was a 6th-century queen of the Ostrogoths. The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Melisent or Melisende. Melisende was a 12th-century queen of Jerusalem, the daughter of Baldwin II.
MILLIEfEnglish
Diminutive of MILDRED, MILLICENT and other names containing the same sound.
MILLYfSwedish, Norwegian, English
Diminutive of EMILIE, MILDRED and other names containing the same sound.
MILOmEnglish, Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century.
MILODRAGmMedieval Slavic (Hypothetical)
Possible medieval Slavic form of MIODRAG.
MIŁOGOSTmPolish (Rare)
Derived from the Slavic elements milu "gracious, dear" and gosti "guest".
MILOGOSTmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of MIŁOGOST.
MILOJEmSerbian
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear", originally a diminutive of names that began with that element.
MILOJICAmSerbian
Diminutive of MILOJE.
MILORADmSerbian, Croatian
Derived from the Slavic elements milu "gracious, dear" and rad "happy, willing".
MILOŠmCzech, Slovak, Serbian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Originally a diminutive of names beginning with the Slavic element milu "gracious, dear". This was the name of a 14th-century Serbian hero who apparently killed the Ottoman sultan Murad I at the Battle of Kosovo.
MILOSHmMedieval Slavic
Medieval Slavic form of MILOŠ.
MILOSLAVmCzech, Slovak, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements milu "gracious, dear" and slava "glory".
MIŁOSZmPolish
Polish cognate of MILOŠ.
MILOVANmSerbian
From Serbian миловати (milovati) meaning "to caress".
MILTIADESmAncient Greek
Derived from Greek μιλτος (miltos) meaning "red earth" and the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This was the name of the general who led the Greek forces to victory against the Persians in the Battle of Marathon.
MILTONmEnglish
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "mill town" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was John Milton (1608-1674), the poet who wrote 'Paradise Lost'.
MIMIfEnglish, Italian
Diminutive of MARIA and other names beginning with M.
MINm & fChinese, Korean
From (mǐn) meaning "quick, clever, sharp", (mín) meaning "people, citizens", or other Chinese/Sino-Korean characters which are pronounced similarly.
MINA (1)fEnglish, Dutch, Limburgish
Short form of WILHELMINA and other names ending in mina. This was the name of a character in the novel 'Dracula' (1897) by Bram Stoker.
MINA (2)fHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil
Means "fish" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the daughter of the Hindu goddess Ushas as well as the daughter of the god Kubera.
MINAKOfJapanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful", (na), a phonetic character, and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MINAKSHIfHinduism, Indian, Hindi
From Sanskrit मीन (mina) meaning "fish" and अक्षि (akshi) meaning "eye". This is another name of the Hindu goddess Parvati.
MINALIfIndian, Hindi
Means "fish catcher" in Sanskrit.
MINATOm & fJapanese (Rare)
From Japanese (minato) meaning "harbour", as well as other combinations of kanji having the same pronunciation.
MINDAUGASmLithuanian
Possibly from Lithuanian mintis "thought" or minti "remember" combined with daug "much". This was the name of a 13th-century ruler of Lithuania.
MINDYfEnglish
Diminutive of MELINDA.
MINENHLEf & mSouthern African, Zulu
From Zulu imini "day" and hle "beautiful".
MINERVAfRoman Mythology, English
Possibly derived from Latin mens meaning "intellect", but more likely of Etruscan origin. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom and war, approximately equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since after the Renaissance.
MINGm & fChinese
From Chinese (míng) meaning "bright, light, clear" or (míng) meaning "inscribe, engrave", as well as other characters which are pronounced similarly.
MINHmVietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (minh) meaning "bright". A famous bearer was the communist revolutionary Ho Chi Minh (1890-1969).
MIN-JIfKorean
From Sino-Korean (min) meaning "quick, clever, sharp" combined with (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (ji) meaning "know, perceive, comprehend". Other hanja combinations are possible.
MIN-JUNm & fKorean
From Sino-Korean (min) meaning "quick, clever, sharp" or (min) meaning "gentle, affable" combined with (jun) meaning "talented, handsome". Other hanja combinations are possible.
MINKEm & fFrisian, Dutch
Diminutive and feminine form of MEINE.
MINNIEfEnglish
Diminutive of WILHELMINA.
MINODORAfRomanian
Romanian form of MENODORA.
MINOOfPersian
Means "heaven, paradise" in Persian.
MINORUm & fJapanese
From Japanese (minoru) meaning "to bear fruit", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations with the same pronunciation.
MINOSmGreek Mythology
Possibly from a Cretan word or title meaning "king". This was the name of a king of Crete in Greek mythology. He was the son of Zeus and Europa. Because Minos had refused to sacrifice a certain bull to Poseidon, the god had caused his wife Pasiphaë to mate with the bull, which produced the half-bull creature called the Minotaur. Minos had Daedalus construct the Labyrinth to house the beast, but it was eventually slain by Theseus.
MIN-SEOfKorean
From Sino-Korean (min) meaning "people, citizens" or (min) meaning "quick, clever, sharp" combined with (seo) meaning "slowly, calmly, composed, dignified" or (seo) meaning "series, sequence". This name can also be formed from other character combinations.
MIN-SUm & fKorean
From Sino-Korean (min) meaning "people, citizens" or (min) meaning "gentle, affable" combined with (su) meaning "luxuriant, beautiful, elegant, outstanding" or (su), which refers to a river in China. Other hanja combinations are possible.
MINTAfEnglish
Short form of ARAMINTA.
MINTTUfFinnish
Means "mint" in Finnish.
MINTXOmBasque
Basque diminutive of FIRMIN.
MINUfPersian
Variant transcription of MINOO.
MIOfJapanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" combined with (o) meaning "cherry blossom" or (o) meaning "thread". Other kanji or kanji combinations can also form this name.
MIODRAGmSerbian, Croatian
Derived from the element mio, a Serbo-Croatian form of the Slavic element milu meaning "dear", combined with dragu meaning "precious".
MIQUELmCatalan
Catalan form of MICHAEL.
MIRA (1)fIndian, Hindi, Marathi, Malayalam, Tamil, Kannada
Means "sea, ocean" in Sanskrit. This was the name of a 16th-century Indian princess who devoted her life to the god Krishna.
MIRA (2)fBulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Polish
Short form of names containing the Slavic element miru meaning "peace" or "world".
MIRABELLAfItalian
Latinate form of MIRABELLE.
MIRABELLEfFrench (Rare), English (Rare)
Derived from Latin mirabilis "wonderful". This name was coined during the Middle Ages, though it eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
MİRAÇmTurkish
Turkish form of MIRAJ.
MIRACLEfEnglish (Modern)
From the English word miracle for an extraordinary event, ultimately deriving from Latin miraculum "wonder, marvel".
MIRAJmArabic
Means "place of ascent" in Arabic.
MIRANmSlovene
Derived from the Slavic element miru meaning "peace" or "world".
MIRANDAfEnglish, Dutch
Derived from Latin mirandus meaning "admirable, wonderful". The name was created by Shakespeare for the heroine in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), about a father and daughter stranded on an island. It did not become a common English given name until the 20th century. This is also the name of one of the moons of Uranus, named after the Shakespearian character.
MIRČEmMacedonian
Derived from the Slavic element miru meaning "peace, world".
MIRCEAmRomanian
Romanian form of MIRČE. This name was borne by a 14th-century ruler of Wallachia.
MIRCHEmMacedonian, Medieval Slavic
Variant transcription of MIRČE.
MIREIAfCatalan, Spanish
Catalan form of Mirèio (see MIREILLE).
MIREILLEfFrench
From the Occitan name Mirèio, which was first used by the poet Frédéric Mistral for the main character in his poem 'Mirèio' (1859). He probably derived it from the Occitan word mirar meaning "to admire".
MIRÈIOfOccitan
Original Occitan form of MIREILLE.
MIREKmCzech, Slovak, Polish
Diminutive of MIROSLAV and other names beginning with the Slavic element miru meaning "peace" or "world".
MIRELAfRomanian, Croatian, Albanian
Romanian, Croatian and Albanian form of MIREILLE.
MIRELEfYiddish
Yiddish diminutive of MIRIAM.
MIRELLAfItalian
Italian form of MIREILLE.
MIREMBEfEastern African, Ganda
Means "peace" in Luganda.
MIRENfBasque
Basque form of MARIA.
MIREYAfSpanish
Variant of MIREIA.
MIRIAMfHebrew, English, German, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of MARY. It is used in the Old Testament, where it belongs to the elder sister of Moses and Aaron. She watched over the infant Moses as the pharaoh's daughter drew him from the Nile. The name has long been popular among Jews, and it has been used as an English Christian name since the Protestant Reformation.
MIRICAfCroatian
Diminutive of MIRELA or names containing the Slavic element miru meaning "peace, world".
MIRINDAfEsperanto
Means "wonderful" in Esperanto.
MIRJAfFinnish
Finnish form of MIRIAM.
MIRJAMIfFinnish
Finnish form of MIRIAM.
MIRKOmSerbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian, Italian
Originally a diminutive of MIROSLAV and other names containing the element miru "peace, world".
MIRNAfCroatian, Serbian
Means "peaceful" in Serbian and Croatian.
MIROmSlovene, Croatian
Short form of MIROSLAV.
MIRON (1)mRomanian, Russian, Ukrainian, Polish
Romanian, Russian, Ukrainian and Polish form of MYRON.
MIRON (2)mHebrew
From the name of the highest mountain in Israel, Mount Meron. It is also the name of a village on its slopes, thought to be on the same site as the ancient Canaanite city of Merom.
MIROSLAVmCzech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements miru "peace, world" and slava "glory". This was the name of a 10th-century king of Croatia who was deposed by one of his nobles after ruling for four years.
MIROSŁAWmPolish
Polish form of MIROSLAV.
MIROSŁAWAfPolish
Feminine form of MIROSŁAW.
MIRSADmBosnian
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from Arabic meaning "watchtower" or Persian meaning "ambush".
MIRSADAfBosnian
Feminine form of MIRSAD.
MIRTAfSpanish, Italian, Croatian
Spanish, Italian and Croatian cognate of MYRTLE.
MIRTEfDutch
Variant of MYRTHE.
MIRTHEfDutch
Variant of MYRTHE.
MIRUNAfRomanian
Possibly derived from the Slavic word mir meaning "peace".
MIRZAmPersian, Arabic, Bosnian
Means "prince" from Persian میرزا (mirza), earlier امیرزاده (amirzadeh), which is ultimately from Arabic أمير (amir) meaning "commander" combined with Persian زاده (zadeh) meaning "offspring".
MÍŠAfCzech
Diminutive of MICHAELA.
MIŠAm & fSerbian, Slovene
Serbian diminutive of MIHAILO, MIROSLAV and other names beginning with a similar sound. In Slovenia it is typically feminine.
MISAKIfJapanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" and (saki) meaning "blossom". This name can be formed from other combinations of kanji as well.
MISHAmRussian
Russian diminutive of MIKHAIL.
MISHOmGeorgian, Bulgarian
Georgian diminutive of MIKHEIL and a Bulgarian diminutive of MIHAIL.
MISImHungarian
Diminutive of MIHÁLY.
MIS'IDmArabic
Variant of MUS'AD.
MIŠKOmSerbian, Croatian
Serbian and Croatian diminutive of MIHAILO, MIHAEL, MIROSLAV and other names beginning with a similar sound.
MISLAVmCroatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element mysli "thought" or moji "my" combined with slava "glory". This was the name of a 9th-century duke of Croatia, also called Mojslav.
MISSIEfEnglish
Diminutive of MELISSA.
MISSYfEnglish
Diminutive of MELISSA. This is also a slang term meaning "young woman".
MISTIfEnglish
Variant of MISTY.
MISTYfEnglish
From the English word misty, ultimately derived from Old English. The jazz song 'Misty' (1954) by Erroll Garner may have helped popularize the name.
MI-SUKfKorean
From Sino-Korean (mi) meaning "beautiful" and (suk) meaning "good, pure, virtuous, charming", as well as other combinations of hanja characters with the same pronunciations.
MITCHmEnglish
Short form of MITCHELL.
MITCHELLmEnglish
From a surname, itself derived from the given name MICHAEL or in some cases from Middle English michel meaning "big, large".
MİTHATmTurkish
Turkish form of MIDHAT.
MITHRAmPersian Mythology
Derived from an Indo-Iranian root *mitra meaning "oath, alliance, friend". In Persian mythology he was a god of light and friendship, the son of the supreme god Ahura Mazda. Worship of him eventually spread outside of Persia, where it was known as Mithraism.
MITHRIDATESmAncient Persian (Hellenized)
Greek form of the Old Persian name Mithradatha meaning "gift of MITHRA". This was the name (in Greek) of several Parthian kings.
MITICĂmRomanian
Diminutive of DUMITRU. This is the name of a character in early 20th-century stories by the Romanian author Ion Luca Caragiale.
MITJAmSlovene
Slovene form of MITYA.
MITRA (1)m & fHinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "friend" in Sanskrit, a cognate of MITHRA. This is a transcription of both the feminine form मित्रा and the masculine form मित्र, which is the name of a Hindu god of friendship and contracts who appears in the Rigveda.
MITRA (2)fPersian
Modern variant of MITHRA used as a feminine name. The true Modern Persian form of Mithra is in fact Mehr.
MITRODORAfMacedonian
Macedonian form of METRODORA.
MITROFANmRussian
Russian form of METROPHANES.
MITSUKOfJapanese
From Japanese (mitsu) meaning "light" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MITULmIndian, Gujarati, Hindi
Derived from Sanskrit मित (mita) meaning "measured".
MITXELmBasque
Basque form of MICHAEL.
MITYAmRussian
Diminutive of DMITRIY or MITROFAN.
MITZIfGerman
German diminutive of MARIA.
MIUfJapanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" and (u) meaning "feather". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MIYAKOfJapanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful", (ya) meaning "night" and (ko) meaning "child". This name can be formed from other combinations of kanji as well.
MIYUfJapanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" or (mi) meaning "fruit, good result, truth" combined with (yu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" or (yu) meaning "tie, bind" or (yu) meaning "evening". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MIZUKIfJapanese
From Japanese (mizu) meaning "felicitous omen, auspicious" and (ki) meaning "hope", besides other kanji combinations.
MLADENmCroatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Derived from the Slavic word младъ (mladu) meaning "young".
MLADENKAfCroatian, Serbian
Feminine form of MLADEN.
MNASONmBiblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek
Possibly means "reminding" in Greek. In Acts in the New Testament Paul stays in Jerusalem with a man named Mnason, a Jew who was originally from Cyprus.
MNEMEfGreek Mythology
Means "memory" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was one of the original three muses, the muse of memory.
MNEMOSYNEfGreek Mythology
Means "remembrance" in Greek. In Greek mythology Mnemosyne was a Titan goddess of memory. She was the mother by Zeus of the nine Muses.
MOf & mEnglish
Short form of MAUREEN, MAURICE, MORRIS, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
MOAfSwedish
Possibly derived from Swedish moder meaning "mother". This was the pen name of the Swedish author Moa Martinson (real name Helga Maria Martinson).
MOABmBiblical
Means "of his father" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Lot. He was the ancestor of the Moabites, a people who lived in the region called Moab to the east of Israel.
MOACIRmNative American, Tupi
Possibly means "son of pain" in Tupi. This is the name of the son of Iracema and Martim in the novel 'Iracema' (1865) by José de Alencar.
MOANAf & mMaori, Hawaiian, Tahitian
Means "ocean, wide expanse of water, deep sea" in Maori and Hawaiian (as well as in other Polynesian languages).
MOCHÁNmAncient Irish
Derived from Irish moch "early" combined with a diminutive suffix.
MODESTASmLithuanian
Lithuanian form of MODESTUS.
MODESTEm & fFrench
French masculine and feminine form of MODESTUS.
MODESTINEfFrench
French diminutive of MODESTUS.
MODESTOmSpanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of MODESTUS.
MODESTUSmLate Roman
Means "moderate, restrained" in Late Latin. This was the name of several saints.
MODESTYfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word modesty, ultimately from Latin modestus "moderate", a derivative of modus "measure".
MOE (1)mEnglish
Short form of MAURICE or MORRIS, or sometimes of other names beginning with a similar sound.
MOE (2)fJapanese
From Japanese (moe) meaning "bud, sprout". Other kanji with the same reading can also form this name.
MOEMAfPortuguese (Brazilian)
Means "lies" in Tupí. This name appears in the poem 'Caramuru' (1781) by the Brazilian poet Santa Rita Durão.
MOERANIm & fTahitian
From Tahitian moe "sleep" and rani "heaven, sky".
MOGENSmDanish
Danish form of MAGNUS.
MOHAMEDmArabic (Egyptian), Arabic (Maghrebi)
Variant transcription of MUHAMMAD (chiefly Egyptian and Algerian).
MOHAMMADmPersian, Tatar, Arabic, Urdu, Punjabi, Pashto, Bengali
Persian and Tatar form of MUHAMMAD. It is also a variant transcription of the Arabic, Urdu, Punjabi, Pashto and Bengali name.
MOHAMMATmTatar
Tatar variant of MOHAMMAD. This form is also usually transcribed Mohammad.
MOHAMMEDmArabic, Bengali
Variant transcription of MUHAMMAD.
MOHANAm & fHinduism
Means "bewitching, infatuating, charming" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form मोहन (an epithet of the Hindu gods Shiva, Krishna and Kama) and the feminine form मोहना.
MOHANDASmIndian, Hindi
Means "servant of Mohana" from the name of the Hindu god MOHANA combined with Sanskrit दास (dasa) meaning "servant". A famous bearer of this name was Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948), also known as Mahatma Gandhi, an Indian leader who struggled peacefully for independence from Britain.
MOHINDERm & fIndian (Sikh)
Variant of MAHENDRA used by Sikhs.
MOHINIfHinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "infatuating" in Sanskrit. This was the name adopted by the Hindu god Vishnu when he took the form of a woman.
MOIRAfIrish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It also coincides with Greek Μοιρα (Moira) meaning "fate, destiny", the singular of Μοιραι, the Greek name for the Fates. They were the three female personifications of destiny in Greek mythology.
MÓIRÍNfIrish
Diminutive of MÓR.
MOIRREYfManx
Manx form of MARY.
MOÏSEmFrench
French form of MOSES.
MOISÉSmSpanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of MOSES.
MOISEYmRussian
Russian form of MOSES.
MOISHEmYiddish
Yiddish form of MOSES.
MOJCAfSlovene, Croatian
Slovene and Croatian diminutive of MARIJA.
MOJDEHfPersian
Variant transcription of MOZHDEH.
MOJGANfPersian
Variant transcription of MOZHGAN.
MOJISOLAfWestern African, Yoruba
Means "wake up to wealth" in Yoruba.
MOKHMADmChechen
Chechen form of MUHAMMAD.
MOKOSHfSlavic Mythology
Derived from Slavic mok meaning "wet, moist". Mokosh was a Slavic goddess of weaving, women, water and fertility. She was often depicted as a woman with a large head and long arms.
MOLLEfMedieval English
Medieval diminutive of MARY.
MOLLIEfEnglish
Variant of MOLLY.
MOLLYfEnglish
Diminutive of MARY. It developed from Malle and Molle, other medieval diminutives. James Joyce used this name in his novel 'Ulysses' (1920), where it belongs to Molly Bloom, the wife of the main character.
MOMCHILmBulgarian
Derived from Bulgarian момче (momche) "boy".
MOMIfHawaiian
Means "pearl" in Hawaiian.
MOMOKAfJapanese
From Japanese (momo) meaning "hundred" or (momo) meaning "peach" combined with (ka) meaning "flower" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MOMOKOfJapanese
From Japanese (momo) meaning "hundred" or (momo) meaning "peach" combined with (ko) meaning "child". This name can be constructed from other kanji combinations as well.
MONA (1)fIrish, English
Anglicized form of MUADHNAIT. It is also associated with Greek monos "one" and Leonardo da Vinci's painting the 'Mona Lisa' (in which case it is a contraction of Italian ma donna meaning "my lady").
MONA (2)fSwedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian short form of MONIKA.
MONA (3)fArabic
Variant transcription of MUNA.
MONATfIrish
Anglicized form of MUADHNAIT.
MONDAYfEnglish (Rare)
From the English word for the day of the week, which was derived from Old English mona "moon" and dæg "day". This was formerly given to girls born on Monday.
MONETf & mVarious
From a French surname which was derived from either HAMON or EDMOND. This was the surname of the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
MONGKUTmThai
Means "crown" in Thai.
MÓNICAfSpanish
Spanish form of MONICA.
MÒNICAfCatalan
Catalan form of MONICA.
MÔNICAfPortuguese
Portuguese form of MONICA.
MONICAfEnglish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Late Roman
Meaning unknown, most likely of North African or Phoenician origin. In the 4th century this name was borne by the North African saint Monica of Hippo, the mother of Saint Augustine, whom she converted to Christianity. Since the Middle Ages it has been associated with Latin moneo "advisor" and Greek monos "one". As an English name, Monica has been in general use since the 18th century.
MONIFAfWestern African, Yoruba
Means "I am lucky" in Yoruba.
MÓNIKAfHungarian
Hungarian form of MONICA.
MONIQUEfFrench, English, Dutch
French form of MONICA.
MONROEmScottish, English
From a Scottish surname meaning "from the mouth of the Roe". The Roe is a river in Ireland. Two famous bearers of the surname were American president James Monroe (1758-1831) and American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).
MONTAfLatvian
Modern Latvian name, possibly from Latin mons "mountain".
MONTAGUEmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname meaning "pointed mountain" in French.
MONTANAf & mEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the American state, which is derived from Latin montanus "mountainous".
MONTEmEnglish
Either a diminutive of MONTGOMERY or from the Spanish or Italian vocabulary word meaning "mountain".
MONTGOMERYmEnglish
From an English surname meaning "GUMARICH's mountain" in Norman French. A notable bearer of this surname was Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976), a British army commander during World War II.
MONTSEfCatalan
Short form of MONTSERRAT.
MONTSERRATfCatalan
From the name of a mountain near Barcelona, the site of a monastery founded in the 10th century. The mountain gets its name from Latin mons serratus meaning "jagged mountain".
MONTYmEnglish
Variant of MONTE.
MÓRfScottish, Irish
Means "great" in Gaelic. It is sometimes translated into English as SARAH.
MORf & mHebrew
Means "myrrh" in Hebrew.
MORAGfScottish
Diminutive of MÓR.
MORANf & mHebrew
Means "viburnum shrub" in Hebrew.
MORANAfSlavic Mythology, Croatian
From a Slavic root meaning "death, plague". In Slavic mythology this was the name of the goddess of winter and death.
MORAYmScottish
Variant of MURRAY.
MORDADfPersian Mythology
Modern Persian form of AMORDAD. This is the name of the fifth month in the Iranian calendar.
MORDECAImBiblical, Hebrew
Means "servant of MARDUK" in Persian. In the Old Testament Mordecai is the cousin and foster father of Esther. He thwarted a plot to kill the Persian king, though he made an enemy of the king's chief advisor Haman.
MORDECHAImHebrew
Variant transcription of MORDECAI.
MORDREDmWelsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From Welsh Medraut, possibly from Latin moderatus meaning "controlled, moderated". In Arthurian legend Mordred was the illegitimate son (in some versions nephew) of King Arthur. Mordred first appears briefly (as Medraut) in the 10th-century 'Annales Cambriae', but he was not portrayed as a traitor until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth. While Arthur is away he seduces his wife Guinevere and declares himself king. This prompts the battle of Camlann, which leads to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur.
MOREENfIrish, English
Anglicized form of MÓIRÍN. It is sometimes used as a variant of MAUREEN.
MORGAINEfArthurian Romance
Variant of MORGAN (2), from a French form.
MORGAN (1)m & fWelsh, English, French
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
MORGAN (2)fArthurian Romance
Modern form of Morgen, which was used by Geoffrey of Monmouth in the 12th century for the Arthurian sorceress Morgan le Fay, who was unnamed in earlier stories. Geoffrey probably did not derive it from the Welsh masculine name Morgan, which would have been spelled Morcant in his time. He may have based it on the Irish name MUIRGEN.
MORGANEfFrench
French, either a form of MORGAN (2) or a feminine form of MORGAN (1).
MORIAHfEnglish (Modern)
From Hebrew מֹרִיָה (Moriyah) possibly meaning "seen by YAHWEH". This is a place name in the Old Testament, both the land where Abraham is to sacrifice Isaac and the mountain upon which Solomon builds the temple. They may be the same place. Since the 1980s it has occasionally been used as a feminine given name in America.
MÓRICmHungarian
Hungarian form of MAURICE.
MORIKOfJapanese
From Japanese (mori) meaning "forest" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
MORITZmGerman
German form of MAURICE.
MORLEYmEnglish (Rare)
From a surname which was originally from an Old English place name meaning "marsh clearing".
MORNAfIrish, Scottish
Anglicized form of MUIRNE.
MORPHEUSmGreek Mythology
Derived from Greek μορφη (morphe) meaning "shape", referring to the shapes seen in dreams. In Greek mythology Morpheus was the god of dreams.
MORRIGANfIrish Mythology
Derived from Irish Mór Ríoghain meaning "great queen". In Irish myth she was a goddess of war and death who often took the form of a crow.
MORRISmEnglish, Medieval English
Usual medieval form of MAURICE.
MORTmEnglish
Short form of MORTON or MORTIMER.
MORTAfLithuanian
Lithuanian form of MARTHA.
MORTENmDanish, Norwegian
Danish and Norwegian form of MARTIN.
MORTIMERmEnglish
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "still water" in Old French.
MORTONmEnglish
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "moor town" in Old English.
MORTYmEnglish
Diminutive of MORTON or MORTIMER.
MORVARIDfPersian
Means "pearl" in Persian.
MORVENfScottish
From a Scottish place name meaning "big gap". This was the name of Fingal's kingdom in James Macpherson's poems.
MORWENNAfCornish, Welsh
Means "maiden" in Cornish (related to the Welsh word morwyn). This was the name of a 6th-century Cornish saint.
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