Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the meaning contains the keywords elf or elves.
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AAFJE   f   Dutch
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element alf "elf".
ÆLFGIFU   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and giefu "gift". This was the name of the first wife of the English king Æðelræd II.
ÆLFHEAH   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and heah "high". This was the name of an 11th-century archbishop of Canterbury, a saint and martyr, who is commonly known as Alphege or Elphege.
ÆLFNOÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ælf "elf" combined with noð "boldness, daring".
ÆLFRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and ric "power, rule".
ÆLFSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and sige "victory".
ÆLFSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and stan "stone".
ÆLFSWIÞ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ælf "elf" combined with swiþ "strong".
ÆLFWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and weard "guardian".
ÆLFWIG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wig "war, battle".
ÆLFWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wine "friend". This name was not commonly used after the Norman conquest.
AILILL   m   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "elf" in Irish Gaelic. This name occurs frequently in Irish legend, borne for example by the husband of queen Medb.
ALBA (3)   f   Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element alf meaning "elf".
ALBERICH   m   Ancient Germanic, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements alf "elf" and ric "power". Alberich was the name of the sorcerer king of the dwarfs in Germanic mythology. He also appears in the 'Nibelungenlied' as a dwarf who guards the treasure of the Nibelungen.
ALF (1)   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse alfr "elf". In Norse legend this was the name of king, the suitor of a reluctant maiden named Alfhild. She avoided marrying him by disguising herself as a warrior, but when they fought she was so impressed by his strength that she changed her mind.
ALFBERN   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements alf "elf" and bern "bear".
ALFHARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements alf "elf" and hard "brave, hardy".
ALFHER   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements alf "elf" and hari "army, warrior" (making it a cognate of ALVAR).
ALFHILD   f   Norwegian, Swedish
From the Old Norse name Alfhildr which was composed of the elements alfr "elf" and hildr "battle". In Norse legend Alfhild was a maiden who disguised herself as a warrior in order to avoid marriage to king Alf. Her life was perhaps based on that of a 9th-century Viking pirate.
ALFRED   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
ALFWIN   m   Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements alf "elf" and win "friend".
ALGAR   m   English (Rare)
Means "elf spear" from Old English ælf "elf" and gar "spear". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman conquest, being absorbed by similar-sounding names and Norman and Scandinavian cognates. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
ALVAR   m   Swedish, Estonian
From the Old Norse name Alfarr, formed of the elements alfr "elf" and arr "warrior".
ELFREDA   f   English
Middle English form of the Old English name Ælfþryð meaning "elf strength", derived from the element ælf "elf" combined with þryð "strength". Ælfþryð was common amongst Anglo-Saxon nobility, being borne for example by the mother of king Æðelræd the Unready. This name was rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 19th century.
GANDALF   m   Norse Mythology, Literature
Means "wand elf" in Old Norse, from the elements gandr "wand, staff, cane" and álfr "elf". This name belongs to a dwarf in the 'Völuspá', a 13th-century Scandinavian manuscript which forms part of the Poetic Edda. The author J. R. R. Tolkien borrowed the name for a wizard in his novels 'The Hobbit' (1937) and 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954).
SIOFRA   f   Irish
Means "elf, sprite" in Irish Gaelic.
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