Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the meaning contains the keywords king or queen or prince or ruler or rule or reign or crown.
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ABD AL-MALIK   m   Arabic
Means "servant of the king" from Arabic عبد ال ('abd al) "servant of the" combined with ملك (malik) "king". This was the name of the fifth Umayyad caliph, who made Arabic the official language of the empire.
ABIMELECH   m   Biblical
Means "my father is king" in Hebrew. This is the name of several characters in the Old Testament including a king of Gerar who takes Abraham's wife Sarah, but is forced by God to give her back.
ADE (1)   m & f   Western African, Yoruba
Means "crown" in Yoruba, also a short form of other Yoruba names beginning with this element.
ADEBAYO   m   Western African, Yoruba
Means "the crown meets joy" in Yoruba.
ADEBOLA   m & f   Western African, Yoruba
Means "the crown has met wealth" in Yoruba.
ADEBOWALE   m & f   Western African, Yoruba
Means "the crown has come home" in Yoruba.
ADEDAYO   m & f   Western African, Yoruba
Means "the crown becomes joy" in Yoruba.
ADEGOKE   m   Western African, Yoruba
Means "the crown has been exalted" in Yoruba.
ADETOKUNBO   m & f   Western African, Yoruba
Means "the crown came from over the sea" in Yoruba.
ÆLFRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and ric "power, rule".
ÆÐELRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and ric "power, rule". This was the name of several early Anglo-Saxon kings.
AL-AMIR   m   Arabic (Rare)
Means "the commander, the prince" in Arabic. This was the name of a 10th-century Fatimid imam.
ALARIC   m   Ancient Germanic
From the Gothic name Alareiks which meant "ruler of all", derived from the Germanic element ala "all" combined with ric "ruler, power". This was the name of a king of the Visigoths who sacked Rome in the 5th century.
ALDRIC   m   French, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name, derived from the elements ald "old" and ric "ruler, power". Saint Aldric was a 9th-century bishop of Le Mans.
ALIKHAN   m   Kazakh
Combination of the name ALI (1) and the Turkic title khan which means "ruler, leader".
AMIR (1)   m   Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Malay, Indonesian
Means "commander, prince" in Arabic. This was originally a title, which has come into English as the Arabic loanword emir.
ANISH   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "supreme, paramount, without a ruler", from the Sanskrit negative prefix (a) and ईश (isha) meaning "ruler, lord".
ANSALDO   m   Italian
Italian form of a Germanic name composed of the elements ans "god" and wald "power, leader, ruler".
ARMEL   m   French
From the old Welsh name Arthfael, which was composed of the elements arth "bear" and mael "prince". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who founded abbeys in Brittany.
ARTAXERXES   m   Ancient Persian (Hellenized), History, Biblical
Greek form of the Persian name Artakhshathra meaning "righteous ruler". This was the name of several Achaemenid Persian rulers. It was also borne by the founder of the Sassanid Empire, usually known by the Middle Persian form Ardashir.
ARTHUR   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.... [more]
ATARAH   f   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Means "crown" in Hebrew. She was a minor Old Testament character, the wife of Jerahmeel.
ATHANARIC   m   Ancient Germanic
From the Gothic name Athanareiks, derived from the Germanic element athana meaning "year" combined with ric meaning "power, ruler". Athanaric was a 4th-century ruler of the Visigoths.
AYTAÇ   m & f   Turkish
Means "moon crown" in Turkish.
BALDER   m   Norse Mythology
Means "prince" from Old Norse. In Norse mythology Balder was the son of Odin and Frigg. Because of the disturbing dreams he had when he was young, his mother extracted an oath from every thing in the world that it would not harm him. However the evil fire god Loki learned that she had overlooked mistletoe. Being jealous, he tricked the blind god Hoder into throwing a branch of mistletoe at Balder, which killed him.
BALDRIC   m   English (Archaic)
Derived from the Germanic elements bald "bold, brave" and ric "power, rule". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it was common in the Middle Ages.
BASIL (1)   m   English
From the Greek name Βασιλειος (Basileios) which was derived from βασιλευς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.
BELSHAZZAR   m   Ancient Near Eastern, Biblical
From בֵּלְשַׁאצַּר (Belshatzzar), the Hebrew form of the Akkadian name Bel-sarra-usur meaning "BA'AL protect the king". This was the name of the son of Nabonidus, the last king of the Babylonian Empire before it was conquered by the Persians in the 6th century BC. In the Old Testament Book of Daniel Belshazzar is the last king of Babylon who sees the mystical handwriting on the wall, which is interpreted by Daniel to portend the end of the empire.
BEORHTRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorht "bright" and ric "power, rule".
BERTHOLD   m   German
Means "bright ruler" from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with wald "rule".
BRENDAN   m   Irish, English
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.
BRENNUS   m   Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Celtic name (or title) that possibly meant either "king, prince" or "raven". Brennus was a Gallic leader of the 4th century BC who attacked and sacked Rome.
BRIJESHA   m   Hinduism
Means "ruler of Brij" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu god Krishna, Brij being a region associated with him.
CADEYRN   m   Ancient Celtic
Means "battle king" from Welsh cad "battle" and teyrn "king, monarch". Cadeyrn (also known as Catigern) was a 5th-century king of Powys in Wales, the son of Vortigern.
CADFAEL   m   Welsh
Means "battle prince" from Welsh cad "battle" and mael "prince".
CANDACE   f   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the hereditary title of the queens of Ethiopia, as mentioned in Acts in the New Testament. It is apparently derived from Cushitic kdke meaning "queen mother". In some versions of the Bible it is spelled Kandake, reflecting the Greek spelling Κανδακη. It was used as a given name by the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation. It was popularized in the 20th century by a character in the movie 'Meet the Stewarts' (1942).
CATHAL   m   Irish
Derived from the Gaelic elements cath "battle" and val "rule". This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Charles.
CHARLES   m   English, French
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".... [more]
CHIBUEZE   m & f   Western African, Igbo
Means "God is the king" in Igbo.
CONRÍ   m   Irish
Means "wolf king" in Irish Gaelic.
CORONA   f   Late Roman, Italian, Spanish
Means "crown" in Latin, as well as Italian and Spanish. This was the name of a 2nd-century saint who was martyred with her companion Victor.
DEVARAJA   m   Hinduism
Means "king of gods" from Sanskrit देव (deva) meaning "god" and राज (raja) meaning "king". This is another name of the Hindu god Indra.
DONALD   m   Scottish, English
From the Gaelic name Domhnall which means "ruler of the world", composed of the old Celtic elements dumno "world" and val "rule". This was the name of two 9th-century kings of the Scots and Picts. It has traditionally been very popular in Scotland, and during the 20th century it became common in the rest of the English-speaking world. This is the name of one of Walt Disney's most popular cartoon characters, Donald Duck. It was also borne by Australian cricket player Donald Bradman (1908-2001).
ECE   f   Turkish
Means "queen" in Turkish.
EDRIC   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and ric "rule". After the Norman conquest this Old English name was not commonly used. It has occasionally been revived in modern times.
EMİRHAN   m   Turkish
Derived from Turkish emir "amir, prince" and han "khan, ruler, leader".
EMYR   m   Welsh
Means "king" in Welsh.
ERIC   m   English, Swedish, German, Spanish
From the Old Norse name Eiríkr, derived from the elements ei "ever, always" and ríkr "ruler". A notable bearer was Eiríkr inn Rauda (Eric the Red in English), a 10th-century navigator and explorer who discovered Greenland. This was also the name of several early kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway.... [more]
EWALD   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name which was composed of the elements ewa "law, custom" and wald "rule".
FITZROY   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname meaning "son of the king" in Old French, originally given to illegitimate sons of monarchs.
FLAITHRÍ   m   Irish
Means "king of princes" from Gaelic flaith "prince" and "king".
FREDERICK   m   English
English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, power". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia. Notables among these rulers include the 12th-century Holy Roman Emperor and crusader Frederick I Barbarossa, the 13th-century emperor and patron of the arts Frederick II, and the 18th-century Frederick II of Prussia, known as Frederick the Great.... [more]
FRIEDHOLD   m   German (Rare)
Means "peaceful ruler", derived from the Germanic elements frid "peace" and wald "rule".
GALADRIEL   f   Literature
Means "maiden crowned with a radiant garland" in Sindarin. Galadriel was a Noldorin elf princess renowned for her beauty and wisdom in J. R. R. Tolkien's novels. The elements are galad "radiant" and riel "garlanded maiden". Alatáriel is the Quenya form of her name.
GANESHA   m   Hinduism
Means "lord of hordes" from Sanskrit गण (gana) meaning "horde, multitude" and ईश (isha) meaning "lord, ruler". This is the name of the Hindu god of wisdom and good luck, the son of Shiva and Parvati. He is often depicted as a stout man with the head of an elephant.
GAUBERT   m   French
French form of the Germanic name Waldobert, composed of the elements wald "rule" and beraht "bright". This was the name of a 7th-century French saint.
GENGHIS   m   History
From the title Genghis (or Chinggis) Khan, meaning "universal ruler", which was adopted by the Mongol Empire founder Temujin in the late 12th century. Remembered both for his military brilliance and his brutality towards civilians, he went on to conquer huge areas of Asia and Eastern Europe.
GERALD   m   English, German
From a Germanic name meaning "rule of the spear", from the elements ger "spear" and wald "rule". The Normans brought this name to Britain. Though it died out in England during the Middle Ages, it remained common in Ireland. It was revived in the English-speaking world in 19th century.
GODRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "power of god", derived from Old English god combined with ric "power, rule". This name died out a few centuries after the Norman conquest.
GORMLAITH   f   Irish, Scottish
Derived from Irish gorm "blue" or "illustrious" and flaith "princess, lady". This was the name of a wife of the 11th-century Irish ruler Brian Boru.
GRUFFUDD   m   Welsh
Welsh name, the second element deriving from Welsh udd "lord, prince" but the first element being of uncertain meaning (possibly cryf "strong"). This was a common name among medieval Welsh royalty. Gruffudd (or Gruffydd) ap Llywelyn was an 11th-century Welsh ruler who fought against England.
GUANTING   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese (guān) meaning "cap, crown, headgear" combined with (tíng) meaning "court". This name can also be formed from other character combinations.
GUANYU   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese (guān) meaning "cap, crown, headgear" combined with () meaning "house, eaves, universe". Other character combinations are possible.
GUMARICH   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements guma meaning "man" and ric meaning "power, rule".
GWRTHEYRN   m   Ancient Celtic
Means "supreme king" from Welsh gor "over" and teyrn "king, monarch". It is possible that this is not a name, but a title. Gwrtheyrn (also known as Vortigern) was a 5th-century king of the Britons. It was he who invited Horsa and Hengist to Britain, which eventually led to the Anglo-Saxon conquest of England.
HAKAN   m   Turkish
Means "emperor, ruler" in Turkish.
HAROLD   m   English
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler". The Old Norse cognate Haraldr was also common among Scandinavian settlers in England. This was the name of five kings of Norway and three kings of Denmark. It was also borne by two kings of England, both of whom were from mixed Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon backgrounds, including Harold II who lost the Battle of Hastings (and was killed in it), which led to the Norman conquest. After the conquest the name died out, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century.
HELMOLD   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements helm "helmet" and wald "rule".
HENRY   m   English
From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".... [more]
HULDERIC   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hulda "merciful, graceful" and ric "power, rule". It has long been confused with the Germanic name Ulrich.
IDRIS (2)   m   Welsh
Means "ardent lord" from Welsh udd "lord, prince" combined with ris "ardent, enthusiastic, impulsive".
IDWAL   m   Welsh
Means "lord of the wall", derived from Welsh udd "lord, prince" combined with gwal "wall, rampart".
INDRANI   f   Hinduism, Bengali, Indian, Hindi
Means "queen of INDRA" in Sanskrit. This is a Hindu goddess of jealousy and beauty, a wife of Indra.
ITHEL   m   Welsh
Means "generous lord" from the Welsh elements udd "lord, prince" and hael "generous".
JAGADISHA   m   Hinduism
Means "ruler of the world" from Sanskrit जगत् (jagat) meaning "world" and ईश (isha) meaning "ruler". This is another name of the Hindu god Vishnu.
JAYESH   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati
Means "lord of victory" from Sanskrit जय (jaya) meaning "victory, conquest" and ईश (isha) meaning "lord, ruler".
JEZEBEL   f   Biblical
From the Hebrew אִיזֶבֶל ('Izevel) which probably means "where is the prince?", a ritual question spoken in ceremonies honouring Baal. Alternatively, it may mean "not exalted". In the Old Testament Jezebel is the evil wife of Ahab, king of Israel. After she was thrown from a window to her death her body was eaten by dogs, fulfilling Elijah's prophecy.
JUDICAËL   m   French, Breton
French form of the Old Breton name Iudicael, derived from the elements iud "lord, prince" and cael "generous". This was the name of a 7th-century Breton king, also regarded as a saint.
JUN (1)   m & f   Chinese, Korean
From Chinese (jūn) meaning "king, ruler", (jùn) meaning "talented, handsome" (which is usually only masculine) or (jūn) meaning "army" (also usually only masculine). This is also a single-character Korean name, often from the hanja meaning "talented, handsome". This name can be formed by other characters besides those shown here.
KAĞAN   m   Turkish
From a Turkish title meaning "king, ruler", ultimately of Mongolian origin. The title is usually translated into English as Khan.
KATAYUN   f   Persian
Possibly from the Persian elements kata "house, city" (but also "king, lord") and bânu "wife".
KAUR   f   Indian (Sikh)
Means "princess", ultimately from Sanskrit कुमारी (kumari) meaning "girl". This surname was assigned to all female Sikhs in 1699 by Guru Gobind Singh. It is now used as a surname or a middle name by most female Sikhs. The male equivalent is Singh.
KELILA   f   Hebrew
Means "crown of laurel" in Hebrew.
KGOSI   m   Southern African, Tswana
Means "king, chief" in Tswana.
KHAN   m   Urdu, Pashto
From a title meaning "king, ruler". Its origin is Mongolian, though the word has been transmitted into many other languages.
KHANPASHA   m   Chechen
Derived from the Turkic title Khan which means "ruler, leader" combined with the high Ottoman military rank pasha.
KIAN (1)   m   Persian
Means "king, foundation, symbol of pride" in Persian.
KING   m   English
From a nickname which derives from the English word king, ultimately from Old English cyning.
KREINE   f   Yiddish
Means "crown" in Yiddish.
KRUNOSLAV   m   Croatian
Derived from the Slavic elements kruna "crown" (a derivative of Latin corona) and slava "glory".
LEAH   f   English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew name לֵאָה (Le'ah) which was probably derived from the Hebrew word לְאָה (le'ah) meaning "weary". Alternatively it might derive from a Chaldean name meaning "mistress" or "ruler" in Akkadian. In the Old Testament Leah is the first wife of Jacob and the mother of seven of his children. Jacob's other wife was Leah's sister Rachel. Although this name was used by Jews in the Middle Ages, it was not typical as an English Christian name until after the Protestant Reformation, being common among the Puritans.
LEROY   m   English
From the French nickname le roi meaning "the king". It has been common as an English given name since the 19th century.
MAËL   m   French, Breton
French form of Breton Mael, which was derived from a Celtic word meaning "chief" or "prince". Saint Mael was a 5th-century Breton hermit who lived in Wales.
MAHESHA   m   Hinduism
Means "great lord" from Sanskrit महा (maha) meaning "great" and ईश (isha) meaning "lord, ruler". This is another name of the Hindu god Shiva.
MALIK (1)   m   Arabic
Means "king" in Arabic. It can also be a variant transcription of MAALIK. In Islamic tradition الملك (al-Malik) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
MALIKA   f   Arabic
Means "queen" in Arabic, the feminine form of MALIK (1).
MALKA   f   Hebrew
Means "queen" in Hebrew.
MEDUSA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Μεδουσα (Medousa), which was derived from μεδω (medo) meaning "to protect, to rule over". In Greek myth this was the name of one of the three Gorgons, ugly women who had snakes for hair. She was so hideous that anyone who gazed upon her was turned to stone, so the hero Perseus had to look using the reflection in his shield in order to slay her.
MELCHIOR   m   Dutch, Judeo-Christian Legend
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "king city". This was a name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus.
MELECH   m   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Means "king" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a son of Micah (not the prophet).
MELQART   m   Near Eastern Mythology
From Phoenician mlk "king" and qrt "city". This was the name of a Phoenician god worshipped especially in the city of Tyre.
MIERVALDIS   m   Latvian
Latvian name derived from the Baltic elements mier "peace" and vald "rule".
MILKA (2)   f   Biblical
Means "queen" in Hebrew. This name appears in the Old Testament belonging to both the wife of Nahor and the daughter of Zelophehad.
MINOS   m   Greek Mythology
Possibly from a Cretan word or title meaning "king". This was the name of a king of Crete in Greek mythology. He was the son of Zeus and Europa. Because Minos had refused to sacrifice a certain bull to Poseidon, the god had caused his wife Pasiphaë to mate with the bull, which produced the half-bull creature called the Minotaur. Minos had Daedalus construct the Labyrinth to house the beast, but it was eventually slain by Theseus.
MIRZA   m   Persian, Arabic, Bosnian
Means "prince" from Persian میرزا (mirza), earlier امیرزاده (amirzadeh), which is ultimately from Arabic أمير (amir) "commander" combined with Persian زاده (zadeh) "offspring".
MONGKUT   m   Thai
Means "crown" in Thai.
MORRIGAN   f   Irish Mythology
Derived from Irish Mór Ríoghain meaning "great queen". In Irish myth she was a goddess of war and death who often took the form of a crow.
MUKESHA   m   Hinduism
Means "ruler of Muka" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu god Shiva, given to him because he killed Muka, a demon in the form of a wild boar.
NAZZARENO   m   Italian
Italian form of the Late Latin Nazarenus, which meant "from Nazareth, Nazarene". Nazareth was the town in Galilee where Jesus lived. According to the New Testament, the phrase Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum meaning "Jesus the Nazarene, king of the Jews", was inscribed on the cross upon which Jesus was crucified.
NKOSANA   m   Southern African, Xhosa
Means "prince" in Xhosa.
NKOSAZANA   f   Southern African, Xhosa
Means "princess" in Xhosa.
NORIKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (nori) meaning "law, rule" or (nori) meaning "rule, ceremony" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
NORMA   f   English, Italian, Literature
Created by Felice Romani for the main character in the opera 'Norma' (1831). He may have based it on Latin norma "rule". This name is also frequently used as a feminine form of NORMAN.
ÓRFHLAITH   f   Irish
Means "golden princess" from Irish ór "gold" combined with flaith "princess". This was the name of a sister of the Irish king Brian Boru.
OSWALD   m   English, German, Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler". Saint Oswald was a king of Northumbria who introduced Christianity to northeast England in the 7th century before being killed in battle. There was also an Old Norse cognate Ásvaldr in use in England, being borne by the 10th-century Saint Oswald of Worcester, who was of Danish ancestry. Though the name had died out by the end of the Middle Ages, it was revived in the 19th century.
PRINCE   m   English
From the English word prince, a royal title, which comes ultimately from Latin princeps. This name was borne by the American musician Prince Rogers Nelson (1958-2016), who is known simply as Prince.
PRINCESS   f   English (Modern)
Feminine equivalent of PRINCE.
PUTERA   m   Malay
Means "son, prince" in Malay, ultimately from Sanskrit पुत्र (putra).
PUTERI   f   Malay
Means "daughter, princess" in Malay, ultimately from Sanskrit पुत्री (putri).
QUEEN   f   English
From an old nickname which was derived from the English word, ultimately from Old English cwen meaning "woman, wife".
QUINTON   m   English
Variant of QUENTIN, also coinciding with an English surname meaning "queen's town" in Old English.
RAGNVALDR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name composed of the elements regin "advice, counsel" and valdr "power, ruler" (making it a cognate of REYNOLD).
RAINE   f & m   English (Rare)
Possibly based on the French word reine meaning "queen". A famous bearer is the British socialite Raine Spencer (1929-), the stepmother of Princess Diana. In modern times it can also be used as a variant of RAIN (1) or a short form of LORRAINE.
RAJA (2)   m   Urdu, Tamil, Indian, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Hindi, Marathi, Indonesian
Means "king, ruler", from Sanskrit राजन् (rajan).
RAJENDRA   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Telugu, Nepali
Means "lord of kings", derived from Sanskrit राज (raja) meaning "king" combined with the name of the Hindu god INDRA, used here to mean "lord". This was the name of two 11th-century rulers of the Chola empire in southern India.
RAJESH   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Punjabi, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali
Means "ruler of kings" from Sanskrit राज (raja) meaning "king" and ईश (isha) meaning "lord, ruler".
RAJKUMARI   f   Indian, Hindi
Means "princess" in Sanskrit.
RAJNI   f   Indian, Hindi
Means "queen" in Sanskrit.
RAJNISH   m   Indian, Hindi
Means "lord of the night" from Sanskrit रजनि (rajani) meaning "night" and ईश (isha) meaning "lord, ruler". This is another name for the moon in Hindu texts.
RAKESH   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu
Means "lord of the full moon" from Sanskrit राका (raka) meaning "full moon" and ईश (isha) meaning "lord, ruler".
RAMESHA   m   Hinduism
Means "husband of Lakshmi", derived from RAMA (2), a name of Lakshmi, combined with ईश (isha) meaning "ruler, husband". This is one of the names of the Hindu god Vishnu.
RANA (2)   m   Punjabi, Urdu, Bengali
From the Sanskrit title राणा (rana) meaning "king".
RANI (1)   f   Indian, Telugu, Hindi, Marathi
Means "queen" in Sanskrit.
RATU   f   Indonesian
Means "queen" in Indonesian and Javanese.
REGINA   f   English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.
RÉGIS   m   French
From a surname meaning "ruler" in Occitan. This name is often given in honour of Saint Jean-François Régis, a 17th-century French Jesuit priest.
REGULA   f   German (Swiss), Late Roman
Means "rule" in Latin. This was the name of a 3rd-century Swiss martyr, the patron saint of Zurich.
REGULUS   m   Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "prince, little king", a diminutive of Latin rex "king". This was the cognomen of several 3rd-century BC consuls from the gens Atilia. It was also the name of several early saints. A star in the constellation Leo bears this name as well.
REINA (1)   f   Spanish
Means "queen" in Spanish.
REINE   f   French
Means "queen" in French.
REX   m   English
From Latin rex "king". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
REYNOLD   m   English
From the Germanic name Raginald, composed of the elements ragin "advice" and wald "rule". The Normans (who used forms like Reinald or Reinold) brought the name to Britain, where it reinforced rare Old English and Norse cognates already in existence. It was common during the Middle Ages, but became more rare after the 15th century.
RHIANNON   f   Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.... [more]
RHODRI   m   Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements rhod "wheel" and rhi "king". This name was borne by a 9th-century Welsh king.
RICHARD   m   English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.... [more]
RÍOGHNACH   f   Irish Mythology
Derived from Irish ríoghan meaning "queen". In Irish legend this was a wife of the Irish king Niall.
RÍOGHNÁN   m   Irish
From Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix.
ROALD   m   Norwegian
Modern form of the Old Norse name Hróðvaldr or Hróaldr, composed of the elements hróðr "fame" and valdr "ruler". This name was borne by the children's author Roald Dahl (1916-1990).
RÓRDÁN   m   Irish
From the older Irish name Ríoghbhardán, which meant "little poet king" from Irish Gaelic ríogh "king" combined with bard "poet" and a diminutive suffix.
ROY   m   Scottish, English, Dutch
Anglicized form of RUADH. A notable bearer was the Scottish outlaw and folk hero Rob Roy (1671-1734). It is often associated with French roi "king".
ROYAL   m   English
From the English word royal, derived (via Old French) from Latin regalis, a derivative of rex "king". It was first used as a given name in the 19th century.
RUAIDHRÍ   m   Irish
Means "red king" from Irish ruadh "red" combined with "king". This was the name of the last high king of Ireland, reigning in the 12th century.
RYAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendant of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).
SARAH   f   English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lady, princess, noblewoman" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of Abraham's wife, considered the matriarch of the Jewish people. She was barren until she unexpectedly became the pregnant with Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it at the same time Abraham's name was changed (see Genesis 17:15).... [more]
SARAI   f   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "my princess" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, this was Sarah's name before God changed it (see Genesis 17:15).
SARGON   m   History
From the Akkadian name Sharru-kinu meaning "true king". This was the name (or title) of the first emperor of Akkad (23rd century BC). It was also borne by the 7th-century BC Assyrian king Sargon II, who named himself after the first Sargon.
SARVESH   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "ruler of all" from Sanskrit सर्व (sarva) meaning "all" and ईश (isha) meaning "ruler, lord".
SATISHA   m   Hinduism
Means "lord of Sati" from the name of the Hindu goddess SATI combined with ईश (isha) meaning "ruler". This is another name for the Hindu god Shiva.
SERAIAH   m   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "YAHWEH is ruler" in Hebrew. This is the name of several minor characters in the Old Testament, including the father of Ezra.
SHAHJAHAN   m   Urdu
Means "king of the world" from the Persian elements شاه (shah) "king" and جهان (jahan) "world". This was the name of the 17th-century Mughal emperor who built the Taj Mahal.
SHAHNAZ   f & m   Persian, Arabic, Urdu
Means "pride of the king" from the Persian elements شاه (shah) "king" and ناز (naz) "pride".
SHAHZAD   m   Persian, Arabic, Urdu
Means "prince, son of the king" in Persian.
SHAPUR   m   Persian
Means "son of the king" in Persian. This was the name of three Sassanid emperors.
SIGIVALD   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and wald "rule".
STEPHEN   m   English, Biblical
From the Greek name Στεφανος (Stephanos) meaning "crown", more precisely "that which surrounds". Saint Stephen was a deacon who was stoned to death, as told in Acts in the New Testament. He is regarded as the first Christian martyr. Due to him, the name became common in the Christian world. It was popularized in England by the Normans.... [more]
SULTAN   m & f   Arabic, Turkish, Urdu, Bengali
Means "ruler, king, sultan" in Arabic. In the Arab world this name is typically masculine, but Turkey it is given to both boys and girls.
SURESHA   m   Hinduism
Means "ruler of the gods" from Sanskrit सुर (sura) meaning "god" and ईश (isha) meaning "ruler, lord". This is another name of the Hindu gods Indra, Shiva or Vishnu.
TAGUHI   f   Armenian
Means "queen" in Armenian.
TAJ   m   Arabic
Means "crown" in Arabic.
TAKEHIKO   m   Japanese
From Japanese (take) meaning "military, martial" or (take) meaning "bamboo" combined with (hiko) meaning "boy, prince". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
TALULLA   f   Irish
From the Gaelic name Tuilelaith, which was derived from Irish tuile "abundance" and flaith "princess".
TEUTA   f   Albanian
Possibly derived from an Illyrian word or title meaning "queen". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Illyrian queen.
THEMA   f   Western African, Akan
Means "queen" in Akan.
THEODORIC   m   History
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the people", derived from the elements theud "people" and ric "power, ruler". It was notably borne by Theodoric the Great, a 6th-century king of the Ostrogoths who eventually became the ruler of Italy. By Theodoric's time the Ostrogoths were partially Romanized and his name was regularly recorded as Theodoricus. The Gothic original may have been Þiudreiks.
TORVALD   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Þórvaldr, which meant "Thor's ruler" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with valdr "ruler".
TUATHAL   m   Irish (Rare)
Means "ruler of the people" in Irish Gaelic.
TUDOR (1)   m   Welsh
Welsh form of the old Celtic name Teutorigos, meaning "ruler of the people" (cognate with THEODORIC). As a surname it was borne by five monarchs of England beginning with Henry VII in the 15th century.
VALDA   f   Latvian
Modern coinage from Germanic wald meaning "power, rule". It has been in use only since the 20th century.
VALDAS   m   Lithuanian
Short form of VALDEMARAS and other Lithuanian names containing the Germanic/Baltic element wald "rule".
VALDIS   m   Latvian
Short form of VOLDEMĀRS and other Latvian names containing the Germanic/Baltic element wald "rule".
VELDA   f   English
Meaning unknown, possibly a derivative of the Germanic element wald meaning "power, rule".
VERCINGETORIX   m   Ancient Celtic
Means "king over warriors" from Gaulish ver "on, over" combined with cingeto "marching men, warriors" and rix "king". This name was borne by a chieftain of the Gaulish tribe the Arverni. He led the resistance against Julius Caesar's attempts to conquer Gaul, but he was eventually defeated, brought to Rome, and executed.
VISVALDIS   m   Latvian
Latvian name derived from the Baltic elements vis "all" and vald "rule". It is thus a cognate of the Slavic VSEVOLOD.
VLAD   m   Romanian, Russian, Medieval Slavic
Old short form of VLADISLAV and other Slavic names beginning with the element vladeti meaning "rule". Vlad Dracula, a 15th-century prince of Wallachia, was Bram Stoker's inspiration for the name of his vampire, Count Dracula.
VLADAN   m   Serbian, Czech, Slovak
Short form of Slavic names beginning with the element vladeti meaning "rule".
VLADIMIR   m   Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element vladeti "rule" combined with meru "great, famous". The second element has also been associated with miru meaning "peace, world". This was the name of an 11th-century Grand Prince of Kiev who is venerated as a saint because of his efforts to Christianize his realm (Kievan Rus). It was also borne by the founder of the former Soviet state, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924).
VLADISLAV   m   Russian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vladeti "rule" and slava "glory".
VLADO   m   Croatian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Short form of VLADIMIR and other Slavic names beginning with the element vladeti meaning "rule".
VLASTA   f   Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian
Short form of names beginning with the Slavic element vlasti "rule, sovereignty" (the descendant word vlast means "homeland" in modern Czech).
VLASTIMIL   m   Czech
Derived from the Slavic elements vlasti "rule, sovereignty" and milu "gracious, dear". In modern Czech vlast means "homeland" (a descendant word of vlasti).
VLASTIMIR   m   Serbian, Macedonian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vlasti meaning "rule, sovereignty" and miru meaning "peace, world".
VLASTISLAV   m   Czech, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vlasti "rule, sovereignty" and slava "glory". In modern Czech vlast means "homeland" (a descendant word of vlasti).
VSEVOLOD   m   Russian, Ukrainian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements visi "all" and vladeti "rule". This was the name of an 11th-century Grand Prince of Kiev.
WALBURGA   f   German
Means "ruler of the fortress" from the Germanic elements wald "power, leader, ruler" and burg "fortress". This was the name of an 8th-century saint from England who did missionary work in Germany.
WALDEMAR   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish
Germanic derivative of the Slavic name VLADIMIR (or perhaps a cognate composed of the Germanic elements wald "rule" and meri "famous"). It was introduced into Scandinavia by the 12th-century Danish king Waldemar (or Valdemar) who was named after a royal ancestor of his Ukrainian mother.
WALDO   m   English, German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names containing the element wald meaning "rule". In the Middle Ages this name became the basis for a surname. Its present use in the English-speaking world is usually in honour of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism. He was (probably) named after the 12th-century Christian radical Peter Waldo, who was from Lyons in France. Though Waldo and his followers, called the Waldensians, were declared heretics at the time, they were later admired by Protestants.
WALTER   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote 'Ivanhoe' and other notable works.
WALTRAUD   f   German
From the Germanic element wald "power, ruler" or walha "foreign" combined with thrud "strength".
WEALDMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements weald "power, leader, ruler" and mær "famous".
WIDALD   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name composed of the elements witu "wood" and wald "power, rule".
WOB   m   Frisian, Dutch
Frisian diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element wald meaning "rule".
XERXES   m   History
Greek form of the Persian name Khshayarsha which meant "ruler over heroes". This was a 5th-century BC king of Persia, the son of Darius the Great. He attempted an invasion of Greece, which ended unsuccessfully at the battle of Salamis.
XOCHIPILLI   m   Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "flower prince" in Nahuatl. He was the Aztec god of love, flowers, song and games, the twin brother of Xochiquetzal.
YIJUN   m & f   Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "joy, harmony" combined with (jūn) meaning "king, ruler". This name can also be formed from other character combinations.
ZEBULUN   m   Biblical
Possibly derived from Ugartic zbl meaning "prince". In the Old Testament Zebulun is the tenth son of Jacob (his sixth son by Leah) and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Genesis 30:20 implies two different roots for the name: זָבַל (zaval) "to dwell" and זֵבֵד (zeved) "gift, dowry". These are probably only folk etymologies.
ZELIMKHAN   m   Chechen
Combination of the name SALIM and the Turkic title khan which means "ruler, leader".
ZOLTÁN   m   Hungarian
Possibly related to the Turkish title sultan meaning "king, sultan". This was the name of a 10th-century ruler of Hungary, also known as Zsolt.
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