Old English Origin Names

This is a list of names in which the origin is Old English. Old English was the West Germanic language spoken by the Anglo-Saxons who inhabited ancient England.
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ADAIR   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the given name EDGAR.
ÆBBE   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EBBA (2).
ÆLFGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ALGAR.
ÆLFGIFU   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and giefu "gift". This was the name of the first wife of the English king Æðelræd II.
ÆLFHEAH   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and heah "high". This was the name of an 11th-century archbishop of Canterbury, a saint and martyr, who is commonly known as Alphege or Elphege.
ÆLFNOÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ælf "elf" combined with noð "boldness, daring".
ÆLFRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ALFRED.
ÆLFRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and ric "power, rule".
ÆLFSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and sige "victory".
ÆLFSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and stan "stone".
ÆLFSWIÞ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ælf "elf" combined with swiþ "strong".
ÆLFÞRYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ELFREDA.
ÆLFTHRYTH   f   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of Ælfþryð (see ELFREDA).
ÆLFWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and weard "guardian".
ÆLFWIG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wig "war, battle".
ÆLFWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wine "friend". This name was not commonly used after the Norman conquest.
ÆLRED   m   Anglo-Saxon
Contracted form of ÆÐELRÆD. This was the name of a 12th-century English saint.
ÆSC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "ash tree" in Old English. This was the nickname of a 5th-century king of Kent, whose birth name was Oeric.
ÆÐELBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Adalbert (see ALBERT). This was the name of a Saxon king of England and two kings of Kent, one of whom was a saint. It became unused after the Normans introduced their form of Adalbert after their invasion.
ÆÐELFLÆD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ELFLEDA.
ÆTHELFLÆD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ELFLEDA.
ÆÐELFRIÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and friþ "peace". The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ÆÐELIND   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ETHELINDA.
ÆÐELMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and mær "famous". It is a cognate of ADELMAR.
ÆTHELNOÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and noð "boldness, daring".
ÆÐELRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and ræd "counsel". This was the name of two Saxon kings of England including Æðelræd II "the Unready" whose realm was overrun by the Danes in the early 11th century. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ÆÞELRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELRÆD.
ÆTHELRED   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELRÆD.
ÆÐELRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and ric "power, rule". This was the name of several early Anglo-Saxon kings.
ÆÐELSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and stan "stone". This was the name of an early king of England. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ÆTHELSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELSTAN.
ÆÐELÞRYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and þryð "strength".
ÆTHELWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element æðel "noble" combined with weard "guardian".
ÆÐELWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and wine "friend". This name became rare after the Norman conquest. Saint Æðelwine was a 7th-century bishop of Lindsey, England.
ÆTHELWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Variant of ÆÐELWINE.
AINSLEE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AINSLEY.
AINSLEY   f & m   Scottish, English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
AINSLIE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AINSLEY.
ALDEN   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name EALDWINE.
ALDITH   f   Medieval English
Middle English form of EALDGYÐ.
ALDOUS   m   English (Rare)
Probably a diminutive of names beginning with the Old English element eald "old". It has been in use as an English given name since the Middle Ages, mainly in East Anglia. The British author Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) was a famous bearer of this name.
ALDUS   m & f   Medieval English
Medieval variant of ALDOUS.
ALF (2)   m   English
Short form of ALFRED.
ALFIE   m   English
Diminutive of ALFRED.
ALFRÉD   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of ALFRED.
ALFRED   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch
Derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
ALFREDA   f   Polish, German, Italian, English
Feminine form of ALFRED.
ALFREDAS   m   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of ALFRED.
ALFREDO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of ALFRED.
ALGAR   m   English (Rare)
Means "elf spear" from Old English ælf "elf" and gar "spear". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman conquest, being absorbed by similar-sounding names and Norman and Scandinavian cognates. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
ALGER   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name ALGAR.
ALPHEGE   m   History
Middle English form of ÆLFHEAH.
ALVENA   f   English
Feminine form of ALVIN.
ALVIN   m   English
From a medieval form of any of the Old English names ÆLFWINE, ÆÐELWINE or EALDWINE. It was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname which was derived from the Old English names.
ALVINA   f   English
Feminine form of ALVIN.
AMBERLY   f   English (Modern)
Elaboration of AMBER, influenced by the spelling of the name KIMBERLY.
ANNALEE   f   English (Rare)
Combination of ANNA and LEE.
ANSLEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of AINSLEY.
AROLDO   m   Italian
Italian form of HAROLD.
ASH   m & f   English
Short form of ASHLEY. It can also come directly from the English word denoting either the tree or the residue of fire.
ASHLEA   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEIGH   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.
ASHLIE   f   English (Modern)
Feminine variant of ASHLEY.
ASHLYN   f   English (Modern)
Combination of ASHLEY and the popular name suffix lyn.
ASHLYNN   f   English (Modern)
Variant of ASHLYN.
ASTON   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from either a place name meaning "east town" in Old English or from the given name ÆÐELSTAN.
ATHELSTAN   m   History
Modern form of ÆÐELSTAN.
AUDIE   f   English
Diminutive of AUDREY.
AUDLEY   m   English
From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning "EALDGYÐ's clearing" in Old English.
AUDRA (2)   f   English
Variant of AUDREY, used since the 19th century.
AUDREA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of AUDREY.
AUDREY   f   English
Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).
AVERILL   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
AVERY   m & f   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
AYLMER   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of ELMER.
BADA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name probably derived from beadu meaning "battle".
BENTLEY   m   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing". Various towns in England bear this name.
BENTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name, composed of Old English beonet "bent grass" and tun "enclosure".
BEORHTRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorht "bright" and ric "power, rule".
BEORHTSIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorht "bright" and sige "victory".
BEORNRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorn "warrior, man" and ræd "counsel".
BEOWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Possibly means "bee wolf" (in effect equal to "bear") from Old English beo "bee" and wulf "wolf". This is the name of the main character in the anonymous 8th-century epic poem 'Beowulf'. Set in Denmark, the poem tells how he slays the monster Grendel and its mother at the request of king Hroðgar. After this Beowulf becomes the king of the Geats. The conclusion of the poem tells how Beawulf, in his old age, slays a dragon but is himself mortally wounded in the act.
BEV   f   English
Short form of BEVERLY.
BEVERLEY   f   English
Variant of BEVERLY.
BEVERLY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's novel 'Beverly of Graustark' (1904).
BLAKE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
BRAD   m   English
Short form of BRADLEY, BRADFORD, and other names beginning with Brad. A famous bearer is American actor Brad Pitt (1963-).
BRADLEY   m   English
From a surname which originally came from a place name meaning "broad clearing" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the World War II American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
BROOK   m & f   English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived near a brook.
BROOKE   f   English
Variant of BROOK. The name came into use in the 1950s, probably influenced by American socialite Brooke Astor (1902-2007). It was further popularized by actress Brooke Shields (1965-).
BROOKLYN   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the borough of New York City, originally derived from Dutch Breukelen meaning "broken land". It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn.
BROOKS   m   English
From an English surname, a variant of BROOK.
BURT   m   English
Short form of BURTON.
BURTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "fortified town". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), an explorer of Africa and Asia.
CEADDA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of CHAD.
CENHELM   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of KENELM.
CENRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cene "bold" and ric "power".
CEOLMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ceol "keel" and mund "protection".
CHAD   m   English
From the Old English name Ceadda which is of unknown meaning, possibly based on Welsh cad "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century English saint. Borne primarily by Catholics, it was a rare name until the 1960s when it started to become more common amongst the general population. This is also the name of a country in Africa, though it originates from a different source.
CHADWICK   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the name of towns in England, meaning "settlement belonging to CHAD" in Old English.
CHESTER   m   English
From a surname which originally belonged to a person who came from Chester, an old Roman settlement in Britain. The name of the settlement came from Latin castrum "camp, fortress".
CHET   m   English
Short form of CHESTER.
CLAY   m   English
From an English surname that originally referred to a person who lived near or worked with clay. This name can also be a short form of CLAYTON.
CLAYTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from various English place names, all meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
CLIFF   m   English
Short form of CLIFFORD or CLIFTON.
CLIFFORD   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "ford by a cliff" in Old English.
CLIFTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "settlement by a cliff" in Old English.
CLINT   m   English
Short form of CLINTON. A notable bearer is American actor Clint Eastwood (1930-), who became famous early in his career for his western movies.
CLINTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally from an Old English place name meaning "settlement on the River Glyme". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Bill Clinton (1946-).
COLA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English byname meaning "charcoal", originally given to a person with dark features.
COLE   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the Old English byname COLA.
COLTEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of COLTON.
COLTON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "COLA's town".
CRAWFORD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "crow ford" in Old English.
CUTHBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of CUTHBERT.
CUTHBERT   m   English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements cuþ "famous" and beorht "bright". Saint Cuthbert was a 6th-century hermit who became the bishop of Lindisfarne, an island off the coast of England. He was known as performer of healing miracles. Because of the saint, this name remained in use in England even after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the Protestant Reformation, but it was (briefly) revived in the 19th century.
CYNEBALD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and beald "bold".
CYNEBURG   f   Anglo-Saxon
Means "royal fortress" from Old English cyne "royal" and burg "fortress". Saint Cyneburga, a daughter of a king of Mercia, was the founder of an abbey at Gloucester in the 7th century.
CYNEFRIÐ   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "royal peace" from Old English cyne "royal" and friþ "peace".
CYNEHEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and heard "brave, hardy".
CYNEMÆR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and mær "famous".
CYNERIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and ric "power".
CYNESIGE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and sige "victory".
CYNEWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and weard "guard".
DADO (1)   m   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO.
DARWIN   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name Deorwine which meant "dear friend". The surname was borne by the English naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882), the man who first proposed the theory of natural selection and subsequently revolutionized biology.
DEORWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements deor "dear" and wine "friend".
DITTE   f   Danish
Danish diminutive of EDITH or DOROTHEA.
DREDA   f   English (Archaic)
Short form of ETHELDREDA.
DU   m   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO.
DUARTE   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of EDWARD. This name was borne by a 15th-century king of Portugal, who was named after his maternal ancestor Edward III of England.
DUDA   m & f   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO or EDUARDA.
DUDDA   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English byname possibly meaning "round".
DUDLEY   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "Dudda's clearing" in Old English. The surname was borne by a British noble family.
DUDU   m   Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of EDUARDO.
DUNSTAN   m   English (Rare), Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements dun "dark" and stan "stone". This name was borne by a 10th-century saint, the archbishop of Canterbury. It was occasionally used in the Middle Ages, though it died out after the 16th century. It was revived by the Tractarian movement in the 19th century.
EADBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and beorht "bright". This was the name of an 8th-century king of Northumbria and three kings of Kent.
EADBHÁRD   m   Irish
Irish form of EDWARD.
EADBURG   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and burg "fortress".
EADGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDGAR.
EADGYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDITH.
EADMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDMUND.
EADRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDRIC.
EADWEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDWARD.
EADWIG   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wig "war". This was the name of a Saxon king of England in the 10th century. The name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
EADWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EDWIN.
EADWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wulf "wolf". This name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
EALDGYÐ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eald "old" and gyð "battle".
EALDRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and ræd "counsel". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EALDWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements eald "old" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EALHHERE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ealh "temple" and here "army".
EALHSTAN   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ealh "temple" combined with stan "stone".
ÉAMON   m   Irish
Variant of ÉAMONN. This name was borne by American-born Irish president Éamon de Valera (1882-1975), whose birth name was Edward.
EAMON   m   Irish
Variant of ÉAMONN.
ÉAMONN   m   Irish
Irish form of EDMUND.
EARDWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element eard "land" combined with wulf "wolf".
EASTMUND   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ESMOND.
EBBA (2)   f   English
From the Old English name Æbbe, meaning unknown, perhaps a contracted form of a longer name. Saint Ebba was a 7th-century daughter of king Æthelfrith of Bernicia and the founder of monasteries in Scotland. Another saint Ebba was a 9th-century abbess and martyr who mutilated her own face so that she would not be raped by the invading Danes.
ECGBERHT   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of EGBERT.
ED   m   English, Dutch
Short form of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDA (2)   f   Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of EDITH.
EDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDDY   m   English
Diminutive of EDWARD, EDMUND, and other names beginning with Ed.
EDE   m   Hungarian
Diminutive of EDVÁRD or EDUÁRD.
EDGAR   m   English, French
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gar "spear". This was the name of a 10th-century English king, Edgar the Peaceful. The name did not survive long after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 18th century, in part due to a character by this name in Sir Walter Scott's novel 'The Bride of Lammermoor' (1819), which tells of the tragic love between Edgar Ravenswood and Lucy Ashton. Famous bearers include author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), French impressionist painter Edgar Degas (1834-1917), and author Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950).
EDGARAS   m   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of EDGAR.
EDGARD   m   French
French form of EDGAR.
EDGARDO   m   Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of EDGAR.
EDI   m   Slovene, Croatian
Slovene diminutive of EDVARD and a Croatian diminutive of EDUARD.
EDIE   f   English
Diminutive of EDITH.
EDISON   m   English
From an English surname which meant either "son of EDA (2)" or "son of ADAM". A famous bearer of the surname was the inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).
EDIT   f   Hungarian, Swedish
Hungarian and Swedish form of EDITH.
EDITE   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of EDITH.
ÉDITH   f   French
French form of EDITH.
EDITH   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
EDMAO   m   Limburgish
Limburgish form of EDMUND. Its spelling has been influenced by the French pronunciation of Edmond.
EDMÉ   m   French (Archaic)
Short form of EDMOND.
EDMÉE   f   French (Rare)
Feminine form of EDMÉ.
EDMOND   m   French
French form of EDMUND. A notable bearer was the English astronomer Edmond Halley (1656-1742), for whom Halley's comet is named.
EDMONDA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of EDMUND.
EDMONDO   m   Italian
Italian form of EDMUND.
EDMUND   m   English, German, Polish
From the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and mund "protection". This was the name of two Anglo-Saxon kings of England. It was also borne by two saints, including a 9th-century king of East Anglia who, according to tradition, was shot to death with arrows after refusing to divide his Christian kingdom with an invading pagan Danish leader. This Old English name remained in use after the Norman conquest (even being used by king Henry III for one of his sons), though it became less common after the 15th century.... [more]
EDMUNDO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of EDMUND.
EDOARDO   m   Italian
Italian form of EDWARD.
EDORTA   m   Basque
Basque form of EDWARD.
ÉDOUARD   m   French
French form of EDWARD.
EDRIC   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and ric "rule". After the Norman conquest this Old English name was not commonly used. It has occasionally been revived in modern times.
EDU   m   Portuguese
Portuguese short form of EDUARDO.
EDUÁRD   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of EDWARD.
EDUARDA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese feminine form of EDWARD.
EDUARDO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of EDWARD.
EDUARDS   m   Latvian
Latvian form of EDWARD.
EDVÁRD   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of EDWARD.
EDVIN   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian
Scandinavian, Finnish, Estonian and Hungarian form of EDWIN.
EDWARD   m   English, Polish
Means "rich guard", derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and weard "guard". This was the name of several Anglo-Saxon kings, the last being Saint Edward the Confessor shortly before the Norman conquest in the 11th century. He was known as a just ruler, and because of his popularity his name remained in use after the conquest when most other Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. The 13th-century Plantagenet king Henry III named his son and successor after the saint, and seven subsequent kings of England were also named Edward.... [more]
EDWEENA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of EDWINA.
EDWENA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of EDWINA.
EDWIN   m   English, Dutch
Means "rich friend" from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and wine "friend". This was the name of a 7th-century Northumbrian king, regarded as a saint. After the Norman conquest the name was not popular, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century. A notable bearer was the astronaut Edwin Aldrin (1930-), also known as Buzz, the second man to walk on the moon.
EDWINA   f   English
Feminine form of EDWIN.
EDWYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of EDWIN.
EDWYNA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of EDWINA.
EDYTA   f   Polish
Polish form of EDITH.
EDYTHA   f   English (Rare)
Elaborated form of EDYTHE.
EDYTHE   f   English
Variant of EDITH.
EETU   m   Finnish
Finnish form of EDWARD.
EGBERT   m   English, Dutch
Means "bright edge" from the Old English elements ecg "edge of a sword" and beorht "bright". This was the name of kings of Kent and Wessex as well as two English saints. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest but was revived in the 19th century.
EIDEARD   m   Scottish
Scottish form of EDWARD.
EKEWAKA   m   Hawaiian
Hawaiian form of EDWARD.
ELDRED   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from EALDRÆD.
ELFLEDA   f   English (Archaic)
Middle English form of the Old English name Æðelflæd which means "noble beauty" from the elements æðel "noble" and flæd "beauty". Æðelflæd was a 10th-century queen of Mercia. This name became rare after the Norman conquest, but it was briefly revived in the 19th century.
ELFREDA   f   English
Middle English form of the Old English name Ælfþryð meaning "elf strength", derived from the element ælf "elf" combined with þryð "strength". Ælfþryð was common amongst Anglo-Saxon nobility, being borne for example by the mother of king Æðelræd the Unready. This name was rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 19th century.
ELFRIDA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ELFREDA.
ELFRIEDA   f   English
Variant of ELFREDA.
ELFRIEDE   f   German
German form of ELFREDA.
ELMER   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English name ÆÐELMÆR. In the United States it is sometimes given in honour of brothers Jonathan (1745-1817) and Ebenezer Elmer (1752-1843), who were active in early American politics.
ELRIC   m   Medieval English
Middle English form of either of the Old English names ÆLFRIC or ÆÐELRIC. Both were rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ELVIN   m   English
Variant of ALVIN.
ELVINA   f   English
Variant of ALVINA.
ELVIS   m   English
Meaning unknown. It could possibly be a derivative of ALVIS or ELWIN. More likely, it is from the rare surname Elvis, which is ultimately derived from the given name ELOISE. The name was brought to public attention by the singer Elvis Presley (1935-1977), whose name came from his father's middle name.
ELWIN   m   English
Variant of ALVIN.
ELWYN   m   English
Variant of ALVIN.
EOFORHILD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and hild "battle". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
EOFORWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements eofor "boar" and wine "friend". This name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.
ESMOND   m   English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements east "grace" and mund "protection". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman conquest. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century.
ESMUND   m   English (Rare)
Variant of ESMOND.
ETHEL   f   English
Short form of names beginning with the Old English element æðel meaning "noble". It was coined in the 19th century, when many Old English names were revived. It was popularized by the novels 'The Newcomes' (1855) by William Makepeace Thackeray and 'The Daisy Chain' (1856) by C. M. Yonge. A famous bearer was American actress and singer Ethel Merman (1908-1984).
ETHELBERT   m   English
Middle English form of ÆÐELBERHT. The name was very rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived briefly in the 19th century.
ETHELDRED   f   Medieval English
Middle English form of ÆÐELÞRYÐ.
ETHELDREDA   f   Medieval English
Middle English form of ÆÐELÞRYÐ.
ETHELINDA   f   English (Archaic)
Middle English form of the Old English name Æðelind, derived from the elements æðel "noble" and lindi "snake". The name was very rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the early 19th century.
ETHELRED   m   English (Archaic)
Middle English form of ÆÐELRÆD. The name was very rare after the Norman conquest, but it was revived briefly in the 19th century.
ETHELYN   f   English
Diminutive of ETHEL.
EVERILD   f   History
Latinized form of EOFORHILD. This was the name of a 7th-century English saint.
EWART   m   English
From an English and Scottish surname which was either based on a Norman form of EDWARD, or else derived from a place name of unknown meaning.
FRED   m   English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese
Short form of FREDERICK or other names containing the same element. A famous bearer was the American actor and dancer Fred Astaire (1899-1987).
FREDA   f   English
Short form of names ending in freda or fred, such as WINIFRED or ALFREDA.
FREDDIE   m & f   English
Diminutive of FREDERICK or FREDA.
FREDO   m   Italian (Rare)
Short form of FEDERICO, ALFREDO or GOFFREDO.
FREIDA   f   English
Variant of FRIEDA.
FRIDESWIDE   f   History
Modern form of the Old English name Friðuswiþ, formed of the elements friþ "peace" and swiþ "strong". Saint Frideswide was an 8th-century English princess who became a nun. She is credited with establishing Christ Church in Oxford.
FRIEDA   f   German, English
Variant of FRIDA.
FRIEDE   f   German
Short form of names containing the element fried, derived from the Germanic element frid meaning "peace".
FRIÐUSWIÞ   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of FRIDESWIDE.
GLADWIN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name GLÆDWINE.
GLADWYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GLADWIN.
GLÆDWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements glæd "bright" and wine "friend". This name was not actually recorded in the Old English era, though it is attested starting in the 11th century.
GODGIFU   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of GODIVA.
GODIVA   f   Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Old English name Godgifu meaning "gift of god", from the elements god and giefu "gift". Lady Godiva was an 11th-century English noblewoman who, according to legend, rode naked through the streets of Coventry to protest the high taxes imposed by her husband upon the townspeople.
GODRIC   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "power of god", derived from Old English god combined with ric "power, rule". This name died out a few centuries after the Norman conquest.
GODWINE   m   Anglo-Saxon
Means "friend of god", derived from Old English god combined with wine "friend". This was the name of the powerful 11th-century Earl of Wessex, the father of King Harold II of England.
GOODWIN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the given name GODWINE.
HAILEE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAILEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAILIE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAL   m   English
Medieval diminutive of HARRY.
HALEIGH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HALEY   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HARLEY   m & f   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HAROLD   m   English
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler". The Old Norse cognate Haraldr was also common among Scandinavian settlers in England. This was the name of five kings of Norway and three kings of Denmark. It was also borne by two kings of England, both of whom were from mixed Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon backgrounds, including Harold II who lost the Battle of Hastings (and was killed in it), which led to the Norman conquest. After the conquest the name died out, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century.
HAROLDO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of HAROLD.
HARRI   m   Finnish, Welsh
Finnish and Welsh form of HARRY.
HARRIS   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name HARRY.
HARRISON   m   English
From an English surname which meant "son of HARRY". This was the surname of two American presidents, William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) and his grandson Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901). The actor Harrison Ford (1942-), who starred in such movies as 'Star Wars' and 'Indiana Jones', is a famous bearer.
HARRY   m   English
Medieval English form of HENRY. In modern times it is used as a diminutive of both Henry and HAROLD. A famous bearer was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It is also the name of the boy wizard in J. K. Rowling's 'Harry Potter' series of books, first released in 1997.
HAYLEE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAYLEIGH   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HAYLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English town (meaning "hay clearing" from Old English heg "hay" and leah "clearing"). It was popularized by the British child actress Hayley Mills (1946-), though the name did not become common until over a decade after she first became famous.
HAYLIE   f   English (Modern)
Variant of HAYLEY.
HEARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Short form of various Old English names containing the element heard meaning "brave, hardy".
HEREWARD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements here "army" and weard "guard". This was the name of an 11th-century Anglo-Saxon leader who rebelled against Norman rule.
HEREWEALD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of HAROLD.
HILD   f   Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of HILDA.
HILDA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HILDRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon
Older form of HILDRED.
HILDRED   f & m   English
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel". This name was revived in the late 19th century, probably because of its similarity to the popular names Hilda and Mildred.
HROÐGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Hrodger (see ROGER). The name became unused after the Normans introduced Hrodger after their invasion. In the Old English poem 'Beowulf' this is the name of the Danish king.
HROÐULF   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF). This name appears in 'Beowulf' belonging to the nephew of Hroðgar.
HUNTER   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
HYLDA   f   English (Rare)
Variant of HILDA.
IRVIN   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of either IRVING or IRWIN.
IRWIN   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name EOFORWINE.
JAYLEE   f   English (Modern)
Combination of JAY (1) and LEE.
KENDRA   f   English
Feminine form of KEN (1) or KENDRICK.
KENDRICK   m   English
From a surname which has several different origins. It could be from the Old English given names Cyneric "royal power" or Cenric "bold power", or from the Welsh name Cynwrig "chief hero". It can also be an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Mac Eanraig meaning "son of HENRY".
KENELM   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English name Cenhelm, which was composed of the elements cene "bold, keen" and helm "helmet". Saint Kenelm was a 9th-century martyr from Mercia, where he was a member of the royal family. The name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has since become rare.
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