Old English Origin Names

This is a list of names in which the origin is Old English. Old English was the West Germanic language spoken by the Anglo-Saxons who inhabited ancient England.
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HAYLEY f English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English town (meaning "hay clearing" from Old English heg "hay" and leah "clearing"). It was popularized by the British child actress Hayley Mills (1946-), though the name did not become common until over a decade after she first became famous.
HAYWOOD m English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "fenced wood" in Old English.
HEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Short form of various Old English names containing the element heard meaning "brave, hardy".
HEATH m English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived on a heath. It was popularized as a given name by the character Heath Barkley from the 1960s television series 'The Big Valley'.
HEDLEY m English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather clearing" in Old English.
HEREWARD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements here "army" and weard "guard". This was the name of an 11th-century Anglo-Saxon leader who rebelled against Norman rule.
HEREWEALD m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of HAROLD.
HILD f Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of HILDA.
HILDA f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HILDRÆD m Anglo-Saxon
Older form of HILDRED.
HILDRED f & m English
Possibly from the Old English masculine name Hildræd, which was composed of the elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel". This name was revived in the late 19th century, probably because of its similarity to the popular names Hilda and Mildred.
HOWARD m English
From an English surname which can derive from several different sources: the Anglo-Norman given name Huard, which was from the Germanic name HUGHARD; the Anglo-Scandinavian given name Haward, from the Old Norse name HÁVARÐR; or the Middle English term ewehirde meaning "ewe herder". This is the surname of a British noble family, members of which have held the title Duke of Norfolk from the 15th century to the present. A famous bearer of the given name was the American industrialist Howard Hughes (1905-1976).
HOWIE m English
Diminutive of HOWARD.
HROÐGAR m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Hrodger (see ROGER). The name became unused after the Normans introduced Hrodger after their invasion. In the Old English poem 'Beowulf' this is the name of the Danish king.
HROÐULF m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF). This name appears in 'Beowulf' belonging to the nephew of Hroðgar.
HUNTER m & f English
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
IRVIN m English
From a surname which was a variant of either IRVING or IRWIN.
IRWIN m English
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name EOFORWINE.
JAYLEE f English (Modern)
Combination of JAY (1) and LEE.
KENDRA f English
Feminine form of KEN (1) or KENDRICK.
KENDRICK m English
From a surname which has several different origins. It could be from the Old English given names Cyneric "royal power" or Cenric "bold power", or from the Welsh name Cynwrig "chief hero". It can also be an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Mac Eanraig meaning "son of HENRY".
KENELM m English (Rare)
From the Old English name Cenhelm, which was composed of the elements cene "bold, keen" and helm "helmet". Saint Kenelm was a 9th-century martyr from Mercia, where he was a member of the royal family. The name was occasionally used during the Middle Ages, but has since become rare.
KENNARD m English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given names CYNEWEARD or CYNEHEARD.
KIM (1) f & m English
At the present it is usually considered a short form of KIMBERLY, but it in fact predates it as a given name. The author Rudyard Kipling used it for the title hero of his novel 'Kim' (1901), though in this case it was short for KIMBALL. In her novel 'Show Boat' (1926) Edna Ferber used it for a female character who was born on the Mississippi River and was named from the initials of the states Kentucky, Illinois and Mississippi. The name was popularized in America by the actresses Kim Hunter (1922-2002) and Kim Novak (1933-), both of whom assumed it as a stage name.
KIMBALL m English
From a surname which was derived from either the Welsh given name CYNBEL or the Old English given name CYNEBALD.
KIMBERLY f English
From the name of the city of Kimberley in South Africa, which was named after Lord KIMBERLEY (1826-1902). The city came to prominence in the late 19th century during the Boer War. Kimberly has been used as a given name since the mid-20th century, eventually becoming very popular as a feminine name.
KIMBERLYN f English (Rare)
Combination of KIMBERLY and LYNN.
KIMMIE f English
Diminutive of KIMBERLY or KIM (1).
KIMMY f English
Diminutive of KIMBERLY or KIM (1).
KINBOROUGH f Medieval English
Middle English form of CYNEBURG.
KINSLEY f English (Modern)
From a surname which was derived from the given name CYNESIGE.
KYNASTON m English (Rare)
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "CYNEFRIÐ's town" in Old English.
LALO m Spanish
Diminutive of EDUARDO.
LEANN f English
Combination of LEE and ANN.
LEANNA f English
Probably this was originally a variant of LIANA. It is now often considered a combination of LEE and ANNA.
LEANNE f English
Combination of LEE and ANNE (1).
LEE m & f English
From a surname which was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. In his honour, it has been commonly used as a given name in the American South.
LEEANN f English
Combination of LEE and ANN.
LEIGH f & m English
From a surname which was a variant of LEE.
LEOFDÆG m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with dæg "day".
LEOFFLÆD f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and flæd "beauty".
LEOFRIC m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with ric "power".
LEOFSIGE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and sige "victory".
LEOFSTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with stan "stone".
LEOFWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Means "dear friend", derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and wine "friend". This was the name of an 8th-century English saint, also known as Lebuin, who did missionary work in Frisia.
LEWIN m English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the given name LEOFWINE.
LINDON m English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of LYNDON.
LINTON m English
From a surname which was originally from place names meaning either "flax town" or "linden tree town" in Old English.
LYNDON m English
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "linden tree hill" in Old English. A famous bearer was American president Lyndon B. Johnson (1908-1973).
MAO (2) m Limburgish
Short form of EDMAO or REMAO.
MAX m German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Russian
Short form of MAXIMILIAN (or sometimes of MAXWELL in English). It is also an alternate transcription of Russian Макс (see MAKS).
MAXINE f English
Feminine form of MAX. It has been commonly used only since the beginning of the 20th century.
MAXWELL m English
From a Scottish surname meaning "Mack's stream", from the name Mack, a short form of the Scandinavian name MAGNUS, combined with Old English wella "stream". A famous bearer of the surname was James Maxwell (1831-1879), a Scottish physicist who studied gases and electromagnetism.
MERLE f & m English
Variant of MERRILL or MURIEL. The spelling has been influenced by the word merle meaning "blackbird" (via French, from Latin merula).
MERRILL m English
From an English surname which was derived either from the given name MURIEL or from place names meaning "pleasant hill".
MERRY (1) f English
From the English word merry, ultimately from Old English myrige. This name appears in Charles Dickens' novel 'Martin Chuzzlewit' (1844), where it is a diminutive of MERCY.
MILBURGA f History
Derived from the Old English elements milde "gentle" and burg "fortress". Saint Milburga, the sister of Saint Mildred, was a daughter of a 7th-century Mercian king. She was supposedly in possession of magical powers.
MILDBURG f Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of MILBURGA.
MILDGYÐ f Anglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements milde "gentle" and gyð "battle". This was the name of a 7th-century saint, the sister of Saint Mildred.
MILDRED f English
From the Old English name Mildþryð meaning "gentle strength", derived from the elements milde "gentle" and þryð "strength". Saint Mildred was a 7th-century abbess, the daughter of the Kentish princess Saint Ermenburga. After the Norman conquest this name became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
MILDÞRYÐ f Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of MILDRED.
MILLIE f English
Diminutive of MILDRED, MILLICENT and other names containing the same sound.
MILLY f Swedish, Norwegian, English
Diminutive of EMILIE, MILDRED and other names containing the same sound.
MILTON m English
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "mill town" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was John Milton (1608-1674), the poet who wrote 'Paradise Lost'.
MONET f & m Various
From a French surname which was derived from either HAMON or EDMOND. This was the surname of the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
NED m English
Diminutive of EDWARD or EDMUND. It has been used since the 14th century, and may have had root in the medieval affectionate phrase mine Ed, which was later reinterpreted as my Ned.
ÖDI m Hungarian
Diminutive of ÖDÖN.
ÖDÖN m Hungarian
Hungarian form of EDMUND.
OSBEORN m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSBORN.
OSBERHT m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSBERT.
OSBERT m English (Rare)
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorht "bright". After the Norman conquest, this Old English name was merged with its Norman cognate. It was rare in the Middle Ages, and eventually died out. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
OSBORN m English
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and beorn "bear". During the Anglo-Saxon period there was also a Norse cognate Ásbjörn used in England, and after the Norman conquest the Norman cognate Osbern was introduced. It was occasionally revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
OSBORNE m English
From a surname which was a variant of OSBORN.
OSBOURNE m English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of OSBORN.
ÓSCAR m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of OSCAR.
ÒSCAR m Catalan
Catalan form of OSCAR.
OSCAR m English, Irish, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "deer friend", derived from Gaelic os "deer" and cara "friend". Alternatively, it may derive from the Old English name OSGAR or its Old Norse cognate ÁSGEIRR, which may have been brought to Ireland by Viking invaders and settlers. In Irish legend Oscar was the son of the poet Oisín and the grandson of the hero Fionn mac Cumhail.... [more]
OSGAR m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and gar "spear".
ÓSKAR m Icelandic
Icelandic form of OSCAR.
OSKAR m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish
Scandinavian, German, Polish and Slovene form of OSCAR. A famous bearer was Oskar Schindler (1908-1974), who saved over 1,000 Polish Jews during World War II.
OSKARI m Finnish
Finnish form of OSCAR.
OSKARS m Latvian
Latvian form of OSCAR.
OSKU m Finnish
Short form of OSKARI.
OSMOND m English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and mund "protection". During the Anglo-Saxon period a Norse cognate Ásmundr was also used in England, and another version was imported by the Normans. Saint Osmund was an 11th-century Norman nobleman who became an English bishop. Though it eventually became rare, it was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the given name.
OSMUND m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSMOND.
OSVALDO m Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of OSWALD.
OSWALD m English, German, Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and weald "power, ruler". Saint Oswald was a king of Northumbria who introduced Christianity to northeast England in the 7th century before being killed in battle. There was also an Old Norse cognate Ásvaldr in use in England, being borne by the 10th-century Saint Oswald of Worcester, who was of Danish ancestry. Though the name had died out by the end of the Middle Ages, it was revived in the 19th century.
OSWIN m English (Rare)
From the Old English elements os "god" and wine "friend". Saint Oswin was a 7th-century king of Northumbria. After the Norman conquest this name was used less, and it died out after the 14th century. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
OSWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of OSWIN.
OSZKÁR m Hungarian
Hungarian form of OSCAR.
OZ (1) m English
Short form of OSWALD, OSBORN, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
OŽBALT m Slovene
Slovene form of OSWALD.
OŽBEJ m Slovene
Slovene variant form of OSWALD.
OZZIE m English
Diminutive of OSWALD, OSBORN, and other names beginning with a similar sound.
OZZY m English
Variant of OZZIE.
PÆGA m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name of unknown meaning.
PARRY m Welsh
From a Welsh surname which was derived from ap Harry meaning "son of HARRY".
PAYTON f & m English (Modern)
Variant of PEYTON.
PEYTON m & f English
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "PÆGA's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress. It is also borne by American football quarterback Peyton Manning (1976-).
PRESLEY f & m English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest clearing" (Old English preost and leah). This surname was borne by musician Elvis Presley (1935-1977).
PRESTON m English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest town" (Old English preost and tun).
PUCK m & f Anglo-Saxon Mythology, Dutch
Meaning unknown, from Old English puca. It could ultimately be of either Germanic or Celtic origin. In English legend this was the name of a mischievous spirit, also known as Robin Goodfellow. He appears in Shakespeare's play 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1600).
RADCLIFF m English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "red cliff" in Old English.
RADCLYFFE m English (Rare)
From a surname, a variant of RADCLIFF.
READ m English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of REED.
REED m English
From an English surname which is derived from Old English read meaning "red", originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion.
REID m English
From a surname, a Scots variant of REED.
RILEY m & f English
From a surname which comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.
ROYSTON m English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "town of Royse". The given name Royse was a medieval variant of ROSE.
RYLEE f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of RILEY.
RYLEIGH f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of RILEY.
RYLIE f English (Modern)
Feminine variant of RILEY.
SÆWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements "sea" and wine "friend".
SANDFORD m English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of SANFORD.
SANFORD m English
From an English surname, originally from a place name, which meant "sand ford" in Old English.
SAWYER m English (Modern)
From a surname meaning "sawer of wood" in Middle English. Mark Twain used it for the hero in his novel 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876).
SEWARD m English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Old English given name SIGEWEARD.
SHAD (2) m English
Perhaps a variant of CHAD.
SIGEBERHT m Anglo-Saxon
Means "bright victory", derived from Old English sige "victory" and beorht "bright". This was the name of a king of Wessex. The name fell out of use after the Norman conquest.
SIGEWEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements sige "victory" and weard "guard, guardian".
SMITH m English
From an English surname meaning "metal worker, blacksmith", derived from Old English smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world.
STAN (1) m English
Short form of STANLEY. A famous bearer was British comedian Stan Laurel (1890-1965).
STANFORD m English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "stone ford" in Old English.
STANLEY m English
From a surname meaning "stone clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was the British-American explorer and journalist Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904), the man who found David Livingstone in Africa. As a given name, it was borne by American director Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999), as well as the character Stanley Kowalski in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947).
STAR f English
From the English word for the celestial body, ultimately from Old English steorra.
STARLA f English
Elaborated form of STAR.
STARR f English
Variant of STAR.
STEW m English
Short form of STEWART.
STEWART m English, Scottish
From a surname which was a variant STUART.
STITHULF m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements stiþ "hard, stiff" and wulf "wolf".
STONE m & f English (Modern)
From the English vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English stan.
STORM m & f English (Modern), Danish, Norwegian
From the vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English storm, or in the case of the Scandinavian name, from Old Norse stormr.
STU m English
Short form of STUART.
STUART m English, Scottish
From an occupational surname originally belonging to a person who was a steward. It is ultimately derived from Old English stig "house" and weard "guard". As a given name, it arose in 19th-century Scotland in honour of the Stuart royal family, which produced several kings and queens of Scotland and Britain between the 14th and 18th centuries.
SUNNGIFU f Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of SUNNIVA.
SUNNIVA f Norwegian
Scandinavian form of the Old English name Sunngifu, which meant "sun gift" from the Old English elements sunne "sun" and giefu "gift". This was the name of a legendary English saint who was shipwrecked in Norway and killed by the inhabitants.
SWIÐHUN m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of SWITHIN.
SWITHIN m History
From the Old English name Swiðhun or Swiþhun, derived from swiþ "strong" and perhaps hun "bear cub". Saint Swithin was a 9th-century bishop of Winchester.
SWITHUN m History
Variant of SWITHIN.
SYNNE f Norwegian
Short form of SYNNØVE.
SYNNÖVE f Swedish
Swedish form of SUNNIVA.
SYNNØVE f Norwegian
Norwegian variant of SUNNIVA.
TATA m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name of unknown meaning.
TATE m English
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name Tata, of unknown origin.
TATTON m English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "Tata's town" in Old English.
TATUM f English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "Tata's homestead" in Old English.
TED m English
Short form of EDWARD or THEODORE. A famous bearer was the American baseball player Ted Williams (1918-2002), who was born as Theodore.
TEDDY m English
Diminutive of EDWARD or THEODORE.
THORLEY m English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "thorn clearing" in Old English.
THORNTON m English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "thorn town" in Old English.
ÞUNOR m Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Anglo-Saxon cognate of Þórr (see THOR).
TRUEMAN m English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of TRUMAN.
TRUMAN m English
From a surname which meant "trusty man" in Middle English. A famous bearer of the surname was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It was also borne by American writer Truman Capote (1924-1984).
ULRIC m English (Rare)
Middle English form of the Old English name Wulfric meaning "wolf power". When it is used in modern times, it is usually as a variant of ULRICH.
UPTON m English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "upper town" in Old English. A famous bearer of this name was the American novelist Upton Sinclair (1878-1968).
VAN m English
Short form of names containing van, such as VANCE or IVAN.
VANCE m English
From an English surname which was derived from Old English fenn meaning "marsh, fen".
WALTON m English
From a surname which was originally taken from various Old English place names meaning "stream town", "wood town", or "wall town".
WARD m English
From an occupational surname for a watchman, derived from Old English weard "guard".
WARRICK m English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of WARWICK.
WARWICK m English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the name of a town in England, itself from Old English wer "weir, dam" and wíc "settlement".
WASHINGTON m English
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English town, itself meaning "settlement belonging to WASSA's people". The given name is usually given in honour of George Washington (1732-1799), commander of the Continental Army during the American Revolution and the first president of the United States.
WASSA f Anglo-Saxon
Meaning uncertain. It may be a short form of a longer name such as Wāðsige, composed of the elements wāð "hunt" and sige "victory".
WAYNE m English
From an occupational surname meaning "wagon maker", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". Use of it as a given name can be partly attributed to the popularity of the actor John Wayne (1907-1979). Another famous bearer is Canadian hockey player Wayne Gretzky (1961-), generally considered the greatest player in the history of the sport.
WEALDMÆR m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements weald "power, leader, ruler" and mær "famous".
WEALHMÆR m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wealh "foreigner, Celt" and mær "famous".
WEBSTER m English
From an occupational surname meaning "weaver", derived from Old English webba.
WEMBA m Anglo-Saxon (Rare)
Byname derived from Old English wamb meaning "belly".
WES m English
Short form of WESLEY.
WESLEY m English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.
WESTLEY m English
From a surname which was a variant of WESLEY.
WHITNEY f & m English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "white island" in Old English. Its popular use as a feminine name was initiated by actress Whitney Blake (1925-2002) in the 1960s, and further boosted in the 1980s by singer Whitney Houston (1963-2012).
WIGBERHT m Anglo-Saxon, Ancient Germanic
Old English form of WYBERT. This is also a continental Germanic cognate.
WIGHEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYOT.
WIGMUND m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYMOND.
WIGSTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WYSTAN.
WIL m & f English, Dutch
Short form of WILLIAM and other names beginning with Wil.
WILBURG f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wil "will, desire" and burg "fortress".
WILF m English
Short form of WILFRED.
WILFRED m English
Means "desiring peace" from Old English wil "will, desire" and friþ "peace". Saint Wilfrid was a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon bishop. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 19th century.
WILFREDA f English (Rare)
Feminine form of WILFRED.
WILFRID m English
Variant of WILFRED.
WILFRIÐ m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WILFRED.
WILHEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of WILLIHARD.
WILKIE m English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a diminutive of the given name WILLIAM.
WILKIN m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of WILLIAM.
WILKY m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of WILLIAM.
WILL m English
Short form of WILLIAM or other names beginning with Will. A famous bearer is American actor Will Smith (1968-), whose full name is Willard.
WILLA f English
Feminine form of WILLIAM.
WILLARD m English
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name WILLIHARD (or the Old English cognate Wilheard).
WILLIS m English
From an English surname which was derived from Will, a diminutive of WILLIAM.
WILMǢR m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of WILLAMAR.
WILMER m English
From an English surname which was derived from the given name WILMǢR.
WILSON m English
From an English surname meaning "son of WILLIAM". The surname was borne by Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), the American president during World War I.
WILT m English
Short form of WILTON. This name was borne by basketball player Wilt Chamberlain (1936-1999).
WILTON m English
From a surname which was derived from the names of several English towns. The town names mean variously "willow town", "well town" or "town on the River Wylye" in Old English. The river name is itself of Celtic origin, possibly meaning "tricky".
WINE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English wine "friend".
WINFRED m English
Means "friend of peace" from the Old English elements wine "friend" and friþ "peace". This was the birth name of the 8th-century missionary Saint Boniface. It became rare after the Norman conquest, though it was revived in the 19th century.
WINFRIÐ m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of WINFRED.
WINIFRED f Welsh, English
Anglicized form of GWENFREWI, the spelling altered by association with WINFRED. It became used in England in the 16th century.
WINNIE f English
Diminutive of WINIFRED. Winnie-the-Pooh, a stuffed bear in the children's books by A. A. Milne, was named after a real bear named Winnipeg who lived at the London Zoo.
WINSLOW m English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from an Old English place name meaning "hill belonging to WINE". A famous bearer of this name was American painter Winslow Homer (1836-1910).
WINSTON m English
From a surname derived from an English place name, which was in turn derived from the Old English given name WYNNSTAN. A famous bearer was Winston Churchill (1874-1965), the British prime minister during World War II. This name was also borne by the fictional Winston Smith, the protagonist in George Orwell's 1949 novel '1984'.
WINTHROP m English
From a surname which was originally taken from town names meaning either "WINE's village" or "WIGMUND's village" in Old English.
WINTON m English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "enclosure belonging to WINE" in Old English.
WOLF m German, Jewish, English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Short form of WOLFGANG, WOLFRAM or other names containing the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf". It can also be simply from the German or English word.
WOODIE m English
Variant of WOODY.
WOODROW m English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "row of houses by a wood" in Old English. This name was popularized by American president Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924).
WOODY m English
Either a diminutive of WOODROW, or else from a nickname derived from the English word wood. A famous bearer is film director Woody Allen (1935-).
WRIGHT m English
From an occupational surname meaning "craftsman", ultimately from Old English wyrhta. Famous bearers of the surname were the Wright brothers (Wilbur 1867-1912 and Orville 1871-1948), the inventors of the first successful airplane, and Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), an American architect.
WULFNOÐ m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and noð "boldness, daring". This name became rare after the Norman Conquest.
WULFRIC m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of ULRIC.
WULFSIGE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and sige "victory".
WULFSTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and stan "stone".
WYATT m English
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name WYOT. Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) was an American lawman and gunfighter involved in the famous shootout at the OK Corral.
WYBERT m Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigberht, composed of the elements wig "battle" and beorht "bright".
WYMOND m Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigmund, composed of the elements wig "battle" and mund "protector".
WYNNE (2) m English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the given name WINE.
WYNNSTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wynn "joy" and stan "stone".
WYOT m Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigheard, composed of the elements wig "battle" and heard "brave, hardy".
WYSTAN m English (Rare)
From the Old English name Wigstan, composed of the elements wig "battle" and stan "stone". This was the name of a 9th-century Anglo-Saxon saint. It became rare after the Norman conquest, and in modern times it is chiefly known as the first name of the British poet W. H. Auden (1907-1973).