Names with Relationship "anglicized"

This is a list of names in which the relationship is anglicized.
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AARON   m   English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name אַהֲרֹן ('Aharon) which is most likely of unknown Egyptian origin. Other theories claim a Hebrew derivation, and suggest meanings such as "high mountain" or "exalted". In the Old Testament this name is borne by the older brother of Moses. He acted as a spokesman for his brother when they appealed to the pharaoh to release the Israelites from slavery. Aaron's rod produced miracles and plagues to intimidate the pharaoh. After the departure from Egypt and arrival at Mount Sinai, God installed Aaron as the first high priest of the Israelites and promised that his descendants would form the priesthood.... [more]
AFRICA (2)   f   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of AIFRIC.
AHMOSE   m   Ancient Egyptian (Anglicized)
From Egyptian Iah-ms meaning "born of Iah", derived from the name of the Egyptian god IAH combined with mesu "be born". This was the name of the first pharaoh of the 18th dynasty. He defeated the Hyksos and drove them from Egypt.
AIDAN   m   Irish, Scottish, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of AODHÁN. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it uses the same fashionable aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden and Hayden.
AIDEEN   f   Irish
Anglicized form of ÉTAÍN.
ALADDIN   m   Literature
Anglicized form of ALA AL-DIN. This is the name of a mischievous boy in one of the tales of 'The 1001 Nights'. He is trapped in a cave by a magician but escapes with the help of a genie.
ALASTAIR   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of ALASDAIR.
ALBY   m   Irish
Anglicized masculine form of AILBHE.
ALISTAIR   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of ALASDAIR.
ALISTER   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of ALASDAIR.
ALPIN   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Ailpein, possibly derived from a Pictish word meaning "white". This was the name of two kings of Dál Riata and two kings of the Picts in the 8th and 9th centuries.
AMON   m   Egyptian Mythology (Anglicized)
From Αμμων (Ammon), the Greek form of Egyptian Ymn (reconstructed as Yamanu) which meant "the hidden one". In early Egyptian mythology he was a god of the air, creativity and fertility, who was particularly revered in Thebes. Later, during the Middle Kingdom, his attributes were combined with those of the god Ra and he was worshipped as the supreme solar deity Amon-Ra.
ANGUS   m   Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of AONGHUS.
ARDAL   m   Irish
Anglicized form of ARDGHAL.
ARISTOTLE   m   Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name Αριστοτελης (Aristoteles) which meant "the best purpose", derived from αριστος (aristos) "best" and τελος (telos) "purpose, aim". This was the name of a Greek philosopher of the 4th century BC who made lasting contributions to Western thought, including the fields of logic, metaphysics, ethics and biology.
ASHLING   f   Irish
Anglicized form of AISLING.
AULAY   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of AMHLAIDH.
BARRY   m   Irish, English
Anglicized form of BAIRRE. It is also sometimes used as an Anglicized form of BERACH.
BEVIN   f   Irish
Anglicized form of BÉBINN.
BLANID   f   Irish
Anglicized form of BLÁTHNAT.
BONAVENTURE   m   History
Variant of BONAVENTURA.
BREDA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of BRÍD.
BREE   f   Irish
Anglicized form of BRÍGH.
BRENDAN   m   Irish, English
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.
BRIDE   f   Irish
Anglicized form of BRÍD.
BRIDGET   f   Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid which means "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
BRONAGH   f   Irish
Anglicized form of BRÓNACH.
CADOGAN   m   Welsh, Irish
Anglicized form of CADWGAN.
CAHAL   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CATHAL.
CAHIR   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CATHAIR.
CAITLIN   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.
CAJETAN   m   History
English form of CAIETANUS.
CALVAGH   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CALBHACH.
CANUTE   m   History
Anglicized form of KNUT.
CARBREY   m   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of CAIRBRE.
CARBRY   m   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of CAIRBRE.
CARROLL   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CEARBHALL. A famous bearer of the surname was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), whose real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, the author of 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'.
CASSIAN   m   Ancient Roman (Anglicized)
From the Roman family name Cassianus, which was derived from CASSIUS. This was the name of several saints, including a 3rd-century martyr from Tangier who is the patron saint of stenographers and a 5th-century mystic who founded a monastery in Marseille.
CATHLEEN   f   Irish, English
Variant of KATHLEEN.
CATRIONA   f   Irish, Scottish
Gaelic form of KATHERINE.
CHEVONNE   f   Irish
Anglicized form of SIOBHÁN.
CHRIST   m   Theology
Modern English form of CHRISTOS.
CLEENA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of CLÍODHNA.
COLIN (1)   m   Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAILEAN or COILEAN.
COMGAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of COMHGHÁN.
CONLEY   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CONLETH.
CONNOR   m   Irish, English (Modern)
Variant of CONOR.
CONOR   m   Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Conchobhar which means "dog lover" or "wolf lover". It has been in use in Ireland for centuries and was the name of several Irish kings. It was also borne by the legendary Ulster king Conchobar mac Nessa, known for his tragic desire for Deirdre.
CONSTANTINE   m   History
From the Latin name Constantinus, a derivative of CONSTANS. Constantine the Great (272-337) was the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. He moved the capital of the empire from Rome to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (modern Istanbul).
COWAL   m   Irish
Anglicized form of COMHGHALL.
CUPID   m   Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Cupido meaning "desire". This was the name of the Roman god of love, the son of Venus and Mars. He was portrayed as a winged, blindfolded boy, armed with a bow and arrows which caused the victim to fall in love. His Greek equivalent was Eros.
DARA (1)   m   Irish
From the Irish Mac Dara which means "oak tree". This was the name of a 6th-century saint from Connemara. It is also used as an Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARACH   m   Irish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARAGH   m   Irish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DARINA (1)   f   Irish
Anglicized form of DÁIRÍNE.
DARRAGH   m   Irish
Variant of DARA (1) or Anglicized form of DÁIRE.
DERMID   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of DIARMAD.
DERMOT   m   Irish
Anglicized form of DIARMAID.
DERVAL   f   Irish
Anglicized form of DEARBHÁIL or DEIRBHILE.
DERVILA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of DEARBHÁIL or DEIRBHILE.
DERVLA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of DEARBHÁIL or DEIRBHILE.
DEVNET   f   Irish
Anglicized form of DAMHNAIT.
DOMITIAN   m   History
From the Roman cognomen Domitianus, itself derived from the family name DOMITIUS. This was the name of a 1st-century Roman emperor, Titus Flavius Domitianus.
DONAGH   m   Irish
Anglicized form of Donnchadh (see DUNCAN).
DONAL   m   Irish
Anglicized form of Domhnall (see DONALD).
DONALD   m   Scottish, English
From the Gaelic name Domhnall which means "ruler of the world", composed of the old Celtic elements dumno "world" and val "rule". This was the name of two 9th-century kings of the Scots and Picts. It has traditionally been very popular in Scotland, and during the 20th century it became common in the rest of the English-speaking world. This is the name of one of Walt Disney's most popular cartoon characters, Donald Duck. It was also borne by Australian cricket player Donald Bradman (1908-2001).
DOUGAL   m   Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Dubhghall, which meant "dark stranger" from dubh "dark" and gall "stranger".
DUNCAN   m   Scottish, English
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Donnchadh, derived from Gaelic donn "brown" and cath "battle". This was the name of two kings of Scotland, including the one who was featured in Shakespeare's play 'Macbeth' (1606).
DYMPHNA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of DAMHNAIT. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint who was martyred by her father. She is the patron saint of the mentally ill.
DYMPNA   f   Irish
Variant of DYMPHNA.
EAVAN   f   Irish
Anglicized form of AOIBHEANN.
EDNA (1)   f   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
EFFIE (2)   f   Scottish
Anglicized form of OIGHRIG.
EILEEN   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of EIBHLÍN. It is also sometimes considered an Irish form of HELEN. It first became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland near the end of the 19th century.
EILISH   f   Irish
Anglicized form of EILÍS.
ELLAR   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of EALAIR.
ELVA (1)   f   Irish
Anglicized form of AILBHE.
ENA (1)   f   Irish
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
ENDA   m   Irish
Anglicized form of ÉNNA.
ENYA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
ERIN   f   English, Irish
Anglicized form of EIREANN. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century.
ESTHER   f   English, French, Spanish, Dutch, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Possibly means "star" in Persian. Alternatively it could be a derivative of the name of the Near Eastern goddess ISHTAR. The Book of Esther in the Old Testament tells the story of Queen Esther, the Jewish wife of the king of Persia. The king's advisor Haman persuaded the king to exterminate all the Jews in the realm. Warned of this plot by her cousin Mordecai, Esther revealed her Jewish ancestry and convinced the king to execute Haman instead. Her original Hebrew name was Hadassah.... [more]
ETHNA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
ETNA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of EITHNE.
EUAN   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of EOGHAN.
EUCLID   m   Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name Ευκλειδης (Eukleides), derived from Greek ευ (eu) "good" and κλεος (kleos) "glory" with the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek mathematician from Alexandria who made numerous contributions to geometry.
EVAN   m   Welsh, English
Anglicized form of Iefan, a Welsh form of JOHN.
EVANDER (2)   m   Scottish, English
Anglicized form of IOMHAR.
EWAN   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of EOGHAN.
EWEN   m   Scottish
Variant of EWAN.
FABIAN   m   German, Dutch, Polish, History
From the Roman cognomen Fabianus, which was derived from FABIUS. Saint Fabian was a 3rd-century pope.
FARQUHAR   m   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of FEARCHAR.
FELIM   m   Irish
Anglicized form of FEIDHLIM.
FERGAL   m   Irish
Anglicized form of FEARGHAL.
FERGUS   m   Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of FEARGHAS.
FILLIN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of FAOLÁN.
FINLAY   m   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
FINLEY   m & f   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of FIONNLAGH.
FINN (1)   m   Irish Mythology, Irish
Older Irish form of FIONN. This is also the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.
FINOLA   f   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of FIONNUALA.
FIONOLA   f   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of FIONNUALA.
FLAVIAN   m   History
From the Roman family name Flavianus, which was derived from FLAVIUS. This was the name of several early saints including a 5th-century patriarch of Constantinople who was beaten to death.
FLORRY   m   Irish
Anglicized form of FLAITHRÍ.
FLURRY   m   Irish
Anglicized form of FLAITHRÍ.
FREA   f   Norse Mythology
Variant of FREYA.
GALL   m   History
Form of GALLUS.
GANYMEDE   m   Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
From Greek Γανυμηδης (Ganymedes), which was possibly derived from γανυμαι (ganymai) "to be glad" and μηδομαι (medomai) "to think, to plan". In Greek mythology this was the name of a beautiful boy who was abducted by Zeus to become the cupbearer to the gods, the successor of Hebe. A moon of Jupiter is named after him.
GARVAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of GARBHÁN.
GLENDOWER   m   Welsh
Anglicized form of GLYNDWR.
GOBNET   f   Irish
Anglicized form of GOBNAIT.
GORDIAN   m   History
From the Roman cognomen Gordianus which meant "from Gordium", Gordium being the capital of Phrygia in Asia Minor. This is the name by which three Roman emperors are known.
GRATIAN   m   History
From the Roman name Gratianus, which meant "grace" from Latin gratus. Saint Gratian was the first bishop of Tours (4th century). This was also the name of a Roman emperor.
GRIFFITH   m   Welsh
Anglicized form of GRUFFUDD.
GUINEVERE   f   Arthurian Romance
From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar, derived from the elements gwen meaning "fair, white" and sebara meaning "phantom, magical being". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.... [more]
HADRIAN   m   History
From the Roman cognomen Hadrianus, which meant "from Hadria" in Latin. Hadria was a town in northern Italy (it gave its name to the Adriatic Sea). A famous bearer of the name was Publius Aelius Hadrianus, better known as Hadrian, a 2nd-century Roman emperor who built a wall across northern Britain.
HEBER (1)   m   Irish
Anglicized form of ÉIBHEAR.
HELEN   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene), probably from Greek ‘ελενη (helene) "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σεληνη (selene) "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.... [more]
HOMER   m   English, Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name ‘Ομηρος (Homeros), derived from ‘ομηρος (homeros) meaning "hostage, pledge". Homer was the Greek epic poet who wrote the 'Iliad', about the Trojan War, and the 'Odyssey', about Odysseus's journey home after the war. There is some debate about when he lived, or if he was even a real person, though most scholars place him in the 8th century BC. In the modern era, Homer has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world (chiefly in America) since the 18th century. This name is borne by the cartoon father on the television series 'The Simpsons'.
HOWELL   m   Welsh
Anglicized form of HYWEL.
INNES   m & f   Scottish
Anglicized form of AONGHUS, also used as a feminine name.
INNOCENT   m   History
From the Late Latin name Innocentius which was derived from innocens "innocent". This was the name of several early saints. It was also borne by 13 popes including Innocent III, a politically powerful ruler and organizer of the Fourth Crusade.
ISAAC   m   English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name יִצְחָק (Yitzchaq) meaning "he will laugh, he will rejoice", derived from צָחַק (tzachaq) meaning "to laugh". The Old Testament explains this meaning, by recounting that Abraham laughed when God told him that his aged wife Sarah would become pregnant with Isaac (see Genesis 17:17). When Isaac was a boy, God tested Abraham's faith by ordering him to sacrifice his son, though an angel prevented the act at the last moment. Isaac went on to become the father of Esau and Jacob with his wife Rebecca.... [more]
ISHBEL   f   Scottish
Anglicized form of ISEABAIL.
ISRAEL   m   Jewish, English, Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name יִשְׂרָאֵל (Yisra'el) meaning "God contended". In the Old Testament Israel (who was formerly named Jacob; see Genesis 32:28) wrestles with an angel. The ancient and modern states of Israel took their names from him.
ITA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of ÍDE.
IVOR   m   Irish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
JACOB   m   English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Latin Iacobus, which was from the Greek Ιακωβος (Iakobos), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel. He was born holding his twin brother Esau's heel, and his name is explained as meaning "holder of the heel" or "supplanter", because he twice deprived his brother of his rights as the firstborn son (see Genesis 27:36). Other theories claim that it is in fact derived from a hypothetical name like יַעֲקֹבְאֵל (Ya'aqov'el) meaning "may God protect".... [more]
JARLATH   m   Irish
Anglicized form of IARFHLAITH.
JASON   m   English, French, Greek Mythology (Anglicized), Biblical
From the Greek name Ιασων (Iason), which was derived from Greek ιασθαι (iasthai) "to heal". In Greek mythology Jason was the leader of the Argonauts. After his uncle Pelias overthrew his father Aeson as king of Iolcos, Jason went in search of the Golden Fleece in order to win back the throne. During his journeys he married the sorceress Medea, who helped him gain the fleece and kill his uncle, but who later turned against him when he fell in love with another woman.... [more]
JOVE   m   Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From Latin Iovis, derived from the stem of Iuppiter (see JUPITER). This was another name of the Roman god Jupiter.
JOVIAN   m   Ancient Roman (Anglicized)
From Latin Iovianus, a Roman cognomen which was a derivative of Iovis (see JOVE). This was the name of a 4th-century Roman emperor.
JUDITH   f   English, Jewish, French, German, Spanish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוּדִית (Yehudit) meaning "woman from Judea", Judea being an ancient region in Israel. In the Old Testament Judith is one of the Hittite wives of Esau. This is also the name of the main character of the apocryphal Book of Judith. She killed Holofernes, an invading Assyrian commander, by beheading him in his sleep.... [more]
JUPITER   m   Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From Latin Iuppiter, which was ultimately derived from the Indo-European *Dyeu-pater, composed of the elements Dyeus (see ZEUS) and pater "father". Jupiter was the supreme god in Roman mythology. He presided over the heavens and light, and was responsible for the protection and laws of the Roman state. This is also the name of the fifth and largest planet in the solar system.
JUSTINIAN   m   History
From the Latin name Iustinianus, which was derived from Iustinus (see JUSTIN). This was the name of a 6th-century Byzantine emperor who attempted to restore the borders of the Roman Empire.
JUVENAL   m   History, Portuguese
From the Roman cognomen Iuvenalis which meant "youthful" in Latin. Juvenal was a Roman satirist of the 1st century.
KANE   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CATHÁN.
KATHLEEN   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of CAITLÍN.
KAY (2)   m   Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From the Welsh name Cai or Cei, possibly a form of the Roman name GAIUS. Sir Kay was one of the Knights of the Round Table in Arthurian legend. He first appears in Welsh tales as a brave companion of Arthur. In later medieval tales, notably those by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, he is portrayed as an unrefined boor.
KEAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CIAN.
KEAVY   f   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of CAOIMHE.
KEELAN   f & m   Irish
Anglicized form of CAOILFHIONN, sometimes used as a masculine name.
KEELIN   f   Irish
Anglicized form of CAOILFHIONN.
KEENAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CIANÁN.
KEEVA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of CAOIMHE.
KELAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CAOLÁN.
KELLY   m & f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).
KENNETH   m   Scottish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Anglicized form of both COINNEACH and CINÁED. This name was borne by the Scottish king Kenneth (Cináed) mac Alpin, who united the Scots and Picts in the 9th century. It was popularized outside of Scotland by Sir Walter Scott, who used it for the hero in his novel 'The Talisman' (1825). A famous bearer was the British novelist Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932), who wrote 'The Wind in the Willows'.
KEVIN   m   English, Irish, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín, derived from the older Irish Cóemgein, composed of the Old Irish elements cóem "kind, gentle, handsome" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the 20th century.
KIERA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of CIARA (1).
KIERAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CIARÁN.
KIERON   m   Irish
Anglicized form of CIARÁN.
KILIAN   m   German, Irish, French
German form and Irish and French variant of CILLIAN.
KILLIAN   m   Irish, French
Anglicized variant of CILLIAN, also used in France.
LEARY   m   Irish
Anglicized form of LAOGHAIRE.
LEOLIN   m   Welsh
Variant of LLYWELYN influenced by Latin leo "lion".
LIVY   m   History
Form of LIVIUS used to refer to the Roman historian Titus Livius.
LUCAN   m   History
From the Roman cognomen Lucanus, which was derived from the name of the city of Luca in Tuscany (modern Lucca). Marcus Annaeus Lucanus, commonly called Lucan, was a 1st-century Roman poet.
MACBETH   m   History
Anglicized form of the Gaelic given name Mac Beatha meaning "son of life", implying holiness. This was the name of an 11th-century Scottish king. Shakespeare based his play 'Macbeth' loosely on this king's life.
MAEVE   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. Her fight against Ulster and the hero Cúchulainn is told in the Irish epic 'The Cattle Raid of Cooley'.
MAHON   m   Irish
Anglicized form of MATHGHAMHAIN.
MALACHY   m   Irish
Anglicized form of MÁEL SECHNAILL or MÁEL MÁEDÓC, influenced by the spelling of MALACHI. Saint Malachy (in Irish, Máel Máedóc) was a 12th-century archbishop of Armagh renowned for his miracles.
MANNIX   m   Irish
Anglicized form of MAINCHÍN.
MARTIAL   m   History
From the Roman cognomen Martialis, which was derived from the name of the Roman god MARS. The name was borne by Marcus Valerius Martialis, now commonly known as Martial, a Roman poet of the 1st century.
MAURA (2)   f   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It has also been associated with Gaelic mór meaning "great". This was the name of an obscure 5th-century Irish or Scottish martyr.
MAUREEN   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of MÁIRÍN.
MAVE   f   Irish
Variant of MAEVE.
MAXEN   m   Welsh (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of MACSEN.
MEAVE   f   Irish
Variant of MAEVE.
MELLAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of MEALLÁN.
MERCURY   m   Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Mercurius, probably derived from Latin mercari "to trade" or merces "wages". This was the name of the Roman god of trade, merchants, and travellers, later equated with the Greek god Hermes. This is also the name of the first planet in the solar system.
MEREDITH   m & f   Welsh, English
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, possibly meaning "great lord" or "sea lord". Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).
MOIRA   f   Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of MÁIRE. It also coincides with Greek Μοιρα (Moira) meaning "fate, destiny", the singular of Μοιραι, the Greek name for the Fates. They were the three female personifications of destiny in Greek mythology.
MONA (1)   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of MUADHNAIT. It is also associated with Greek monos "one" and Leonardo da Vinci's painting the 'Mona Lisa' (in which case it is a contraction of Italian ma donna meaning "my lady").
MONAT   f   Irish
Anglicized form of MUADHNAIT.
MORDRED   m   Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From Welsh Medraut, meaning uncertain. In Arthurian legend Mordred was the illegitimate son (in some versions nephew) of King Arthur. Mordred first appears briefly (as Medraut) in the 10th-century 'Annales Cambriae', but he was not portrayed as a traitor until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth. While Arthur is away he seduces his wife Guinevere and declares himself king. This prompts the battle of Camlann, which leads to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur.
MOREEN   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of MÓIRÍN. It is sometimes used as a variant of MAUREEN.
MORNA   f   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of MUIRNE.
MOSES   m   English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name מֹשֶׁה (Mosheh) which is most likely derived from Egyptian mes meaning "son", but could also possibly mean "deliver" in Hebrew. The meaning suggested in the Old Testament of "drew out" from Hebrew משה (mashah) is probably an invented etymology (see Exodus 2:10). The biblical Moses was drawn out of the Nile by the pharaoh's daughter and adopted into the royal family, at a time when the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. With his brother Aaron he demanded the pharaoh release the Israelites, which was only done after God sent ten plagues upon Egypt. Moses led the people across the Red Sea and to Mount Sinai, where he received the Ten Commandments from God. After 40 years of wandering in the desert the people reached Canaan, the Promised Land, but Moses died just before entering it.... [more]
MOYNA   f   Irish, Scottish
Variant of MONA (1).
MURDO   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of MUIREADHACH or MURCHADH.
MURDOCH   m   Irish
Anglicized form of MUIREDACH.
MURIEL   f   English, French, Irish
Medieval English form of a Celtic name which was probably related to the Irish name MUIRGEL. The Normans brought it to England from Brittany. In the modern era it was popularized by a character from Dinah Craik's novel 'John Halifax, Gentleman' (1856).
MURNA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of MUIRNE.
MURROUGH   m   Irish
Anglicized form of MURCHADH.
MURTAGH   m   Irish
Anglicized form of MUIRCHERTACH or MUIREDACH.
MYRNA   f   Irish
Anglicized form of MUIRNE.
NEBUCHADNEZZAR   m   Ancient Near Eastern (Anglicized), Biblical
From the Akkadian name Nabu-kudurri-usur meaning "NABU preserve my firstborn son". This name was borne by a 12th-century BC king of the Babylonian Empire. It was also borne by a 6th-century BC king of the Neo-Babylonian Empire. He captured Jerusalem, and ultimately destroyed the city's temple and deported many of its citizens, as told in the Old Testament.
NEPTUNE   m   Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Neptunus, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to the Indo-European root *nebh "wet, damp, clouds". Neptune was the god of the sea in Roman mythology, approximately equivalent to the Greek god Poseidon. This is also the name of the eighth planet in the solar system.
NESS (1)   f   Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of NEAS.
NESSA (3)   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of NEASA.
NEVAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of NAOMHÁN.
NEVE   f   Irish
Anglicized form of NIAMH.
NIVEN   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of NAOMHÁN.
OCTAVIAN   m   History, Romanian
From the Roman name Octavianus, which was derived from the name OCTAVIUS. After Gaius Octavius (later Roman emperor Augustus) was adopted by Julius Caesar he took the name Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus.
ODRAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of ODHRÁN.
OONA   f   Irish, Finnish
Irish variant and Finnish form of ÚNA.
OONAGH   f   Irish
Variant of ÚNA.
ORAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of ODHRÁN.
ORIGEN   m   History
From the Greek name Ωριγενης (Origenes), which was possibly derived from the name of the Egyptian god HORUS combined with γενης (genes) "born". Origen was a 3rd-century theologian from Alexandria. Long after his death some of his writings were declared heretical, hence he is not regarded as a saint.
ORLA (1)   f   Irish
Anglicized form of ÓRFHLAITH.
ORLAGH   f   Irish
Anglicized form of ÓRFHLAITH.
ORNA (1)   f   Irish
Anglicized form of ODHARNAIT.
ORNAT   f   Irish
Anglicized form of ODHARNAIT.
ORRIN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of ODHRÁN.
OSHEEN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of OISÍN.
OVID   m   History
From the Roman family name Ovidius, which was possibly derived from Latin ovis "a sheep". Alternatively, it could have a Sabellic origin. Publius Ovidius Naso, better known as Ovid, was a 1st-century BC Roman poet who often wrote on the subjects of love and mythology. He was sent into exile by emperor Augustus for no apparent reason.
OWEN (2)   m   Irish
Anglicized form of EOGHAN.
PHELAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of FAOLÁN.
PHELIM   m   Irish
Anglicized form of FEIDHLIM.
PLINY   m   History
From the Roman family name Plinius, which is of unknown meaning. Two 1st-century Romans are known by this name: Gaius Plinius Secundus (called Pliny the Elder), a scientist and historian who died during the eruption of Mount Vesuvius; and Caius Plinius Caecilius Secundus (called Pliny the Younger), an author and statesman.
PLUTARCH   m   History
From the Greek name Πλουταρχος (Ploutarchos), which was derived from πλουτος (ploutos) "riches, wealth" and αρχος (archos) "master". Plutarch was a 1st-century Greek historian.
POLYCARP   m   Ancient Greek (Anglicized)
From the Greek name Πολυκαρπος (Polykarpos) meaning "fruitful, rich in fruit", ultimately from Greek πολυς (polys) "much" and καρπος (karpos) "fruit". Saint Polycarp was a 2nd-century bishop of Smyrna who was martyred by being burned at the stake and then stabbed.
POMPEY   m   History
Modern form of the Roman family name Pompeius, which was probably derived from a Sabellic word meaning "five". A notable bearer was the 1st-century BC Roman general Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, also known as Pompey the Great.
PRIAM   m   Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Greek Πριαμος (Priamos), possibly meaning "redeemed". In Greek legend Priam was the king of Troy during the Trojan War and the father of many children including Hector and Paris.
PTOLEMY   m   History
From the Greek name Πτολεμαιος (Ptolemaios), derived from Greek πολεμηιος (polemeios) meaning "aggressive, warlike". Ptolemy was the name of several Greco-Egyptian rulers of Egypt, all descendants of Ptolemy I, one of the generals of Alexander the Great. This was also the name of a Greek astronomer.
QUINTILIAN   m   History
From the Roman cognomen Quintilianus, which was itself derived from the Roman name QUINTILLUS. A notable bearer was the 1st-century rhetorician Marcus Fabius Quintilianus, simply known as Quintilian in English.
REARDEN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of RÓRDÁN.
REDMOND   m   Irish
Anglicized form of RÉAMANN.
REDMUND   m   Irish
Anglicized form of RÉAMANN.
REECE   m   Welsh
Anglicized form of RHYS.
REES   m   Welsh
Anglicized form of RHYS.
REESE   m   Welsh
Anglicized form of RHYS.
RIORDAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of RÓRDÁN.
RODERICK   m   English, Scottish, Welsh
Means "famous power" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ric "power". This name was in use among the Visigoths; it was borne by their last king (also known as Rodrigo), who died fighting the Muslim invaders of Spain in the 8th century. It also had cognates in Old Norse and West Germanic, and Scandinavian settlers and Normans introduced it to England, though it died out after the Middle Ages. It was revived in the English-speaking world by Sir Walter Scott's poem 'The Vision of Don Roderick' (1811).
RONIT (1)   f   Irish
Anglicized form of RATHNAIT.
RORY   m   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of RUAIDHRÍ.
ROSHEEN   f   Irish
Anglicized form of RÓISÍN.
ROY   m   Scottish, English, Dutch
Anglicized form of RUADH. A notable bearer was the Scottish outlaw and folk hero Rob Roy (1671-1734). It is often associated with French roi "king".
SAMUEL   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Jewish, Biblical
From the Hebrew name שְׁמוּאֵל (Shemu'el) which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard". As told in the Books of Samuel in the Old Testament, Samuel was the last of the ruling judges. He led the Israelites during a period of domination by the Philistines, who were ultimately defeated in battle at Mizpah. Later he anointed Saul to be the first king of Israel, and even later anointed his successor David.... [more]
SARGON   m   History
From the Akkadian name Sharru-kinu meaning "true king". This was the name (or title) of the first emperor of Akkad (23rd century BC). It was also borne by the 7th-century BC Assyrian king Sargon II, who named himself after the first Sargon.
SATURN   m   Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Saturnus, which is of unknown meaning. In Roman mythology he was the father of Jupiter, Juno and others, and was also the god of agriculture. This is also the name of the ringed sixth planet in the solar system.
SAUL   m   Biblical, Jewish, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name שָׁאוּל (Sha'ul) which meant "asked for, prayed for". This was the name of the first king of Israel, as told in the Old Testament. Before the end of his reign he lost favour with God, and after a defeat by the Philistines he was succeeded by David as king. In the New Testament, Saul was the original Hebrew name of the apostle Paul.
SEAN   m   Irish, English
Anglicized form of SEÁN.
SENAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of SENÁN.
SEONA   f   Scottish
Anglicized form of SEONAG or SEÒNAID.
SHAMUS   m   Irish
Anglicized form of SÉAMUS.
SHAN   f   Welsh
Anglicized form of SIÂN.
SHANE   m   Irish, English
Anglicized form of SEÁN. It came into general use in America after the release of the western movie 'Shane' (1953).
SHAVONNE   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of SIOBHÁN.
SHAW (2)   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of SEAGHDH.
SHAY (1)   m   Irish
Anglicized form of SÉAGHDHA.
SHEA   m & f   Irish
Anglicized form of SÉAGHDHA, sometimes used as a feminine name.
SHEAMUS   m   Irish
Anglicized form of SÉAMUS.
SHEENA   f   Scottish, English
Anglicized form of SÌNE. This name was popularized outside of Scotland in the 1980s by the singer Sheena Easton (1959-).
SHEILA   f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of SÍLE.
SHEONA   f   Scottish
Variant of SHONA.
SHEVAUN   f   Irish, English (Rare)
Anglicized form of SIOBHÁN.
SHEVON   f   Irish, English (Rare)
Anglicized form of SIOBHÁN.
SHOLTO   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of SÌOLTACH.
SHONA   f   Scottish
Anglicized form of SEONAG or SEÒNAID. Though unconnected, this is also the name of an ethnic group who live in southern Africa, mainly Zimbabwe.
SIVE   f   Irish
Anglicized form of SADB.
SOLOMON   m   Biblical, English, Jewish
From the Hebrew name שְׁלֹמֹה (Shelomoh) which was derived from Hebrew שָׁלוֹם (shalom) "peace". As told in the Old Testament, Solomon was a king of Israel, the son of David and Bathsheba. He was renowned for his wisdom and wealth. Towards the end of his reign he angered God by turning to idolatry. Supposedly, he was the author of the Book of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and the Song of Solomon.... [more]
SOMERLED   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of the Old Norse name Somarliðr meaning "summer traveller". This was the name of a 12th-century Scottish warlord who created a kingdom on the Scottish islands.
SORLEY   m   Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of SOMHAIRLE.
SULEIMAN   m   History
Westernized form of SÜLEYMAN.
SWEENEY   m   Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of SUIBHNE.
TARQUIN   m   History
From the Roman name Tarquinius which is of unknown meaning, possibly Etruscan in origin. This was the name of two early kings of Rome.
TASKILL   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of TASGALL.
TAVISH   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of Thàmhais, vocative case of TÀMHAS. Alternatively it could be taken from the Scottish surname MacTavish, Anglicized form of Mac Tàmhais, meaning "son of Thomas".
TEAGUE   m   Irish
Anglicized form of TADHG.
TEIGE   m   Irish
Anglicized form of TADHG.
TEIGUE   m   Irish
Anglicized form of TADHG.
THEODORIC   m   History
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the people", derived from the elements theud "people" and ric "power, ruler". It was notably borne by Theodoric the Great, a 6th-century king of the Ostrogoths who eventually became the ruler of Italy. By Theodoric's time the Ostrogoths were partially Romanized and his name was regularly recorded as Theodoricus. The Gothic original may have been Þiudreiks.
THUTMOSE   m   Ancient Egyptian (Anglicized)
From Τουθμωσις (Touthmosis), the Greek form of Egyptian Djhwty-ms meaning "born of Thoth", itself composed of the name of the Egyptian god THOTH combined with mesu "be born". Thutmose was the name of four Egyptian pharaohs of the New Kingdom, including Thutmose III who conquered Syria and Nubia.
TIERNAN   m   Irish
Anglicized form of TIGHEARNÁN.
TIERNEY   m & f   Irish, English (Rare)
Anglicized form of TIGHEARNACH. In part, it is from a surname derived from the given name.
TIGHE   m   Irish
Anglicized form of TADHG.
TOAL   m   Irish
Anglicized form of TUATHAL.
TORQUIL   m   Scottish
Anglicized form of TORCUIL.
TRAHERNE   m   Welsh
Anglicized form of TRAHAEARN.
TRAJAN   m   History, Macedonian
From the Roman cognomen Traianus, which is of unknown meaning. The Roman emperor Trajan (full name Marcus Ulpius Traianus) is considered among the most capable men to have led the empire. His military accomplishments include victories over Dacia and Parthia.
TULLY   m   History
Form of Tullius (see TULLIO) used to refer to the Roman orator Marcus Tullius Cicero.
TURLOUGH   m   Irish
Anglicized form of TOIRDHEALBHACH.
ULICK   m   Irish
Anglicized form of UILLEAG.
URBAN   m   Danish, Swedish, German, Polish, Slovene, Biblical, History
From the Latin name Urbanus which meant "city dweller". This name is mentioned briefly in one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament. It was subsequently borne by eight popes.
UTHER   m   Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
From the Welsh name Uthyr, derived from Welsh uthr "terrible". In Arthurian legend Uther was the father of King Arthur. He appears in some early Welsh texts, but is chiefly known from the 12th-century chronicles of Geoffrey of Monmouth.
VALERIAN   m   History, Russian, Ukrainian, Georgian, Romanian
From the Roman cognomen Valerianus, which was itself derived from the Roman name VALERIUS. This was the name of a 3rd-century Roman emperor. Several saints also had this name, including a 2nd-century martyr of Lyons.
VESPASIAN   m   History
From the Roman cognomen Vespasianus, derived either from Latin vesper meaning "west" or "evening" or vespa meaning "wasp". This was the name of a 1st-century Roman emperor, Titus Flavius Vespasianus, the founder of the Flavian dynasty.
VORTIGERN   m   History
English form of GWRTHEYRN.
VULCAN   m   Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Latin Vulcanus, possibly related to fulgere "to flash", but more likely of pre-Latin origin. In Roman mythology Vulcan was the god of fire. He was later equated with the Greek god Hephaestus.
WINIFRED   f   Welsh, English
Anglicized form of GWENFREWI, the spelling altered by association with WINFRED. It became used in England in the 16th century.
YORATH   m   Welsh
Anglicized form of IORWERTH.
ZEPHYR   m   Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Greek Ζεφυρος (Zephyros) meaning "the west wind". Zephyros was the Greek god of the west wind.
ZION   m   Jewish, Biblical
From the name of a citadel which was in the center of Jerusalem. Zion is also used to refer to a Jewish homeland and to heaven.
ZULEIKA   f   Literature
Possibly means "brilliant beauty" in Persian. According to medieval legends this was the name of Potiphar's wife in the Bible. She has been a frequent subject of poems and tales.
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