Names with Relationship "from different language"

This is a list of names in which the relationship is from different language.
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NAGENDRA   m   Hinduism, Indian, Kannada, Telugu
Means "lord of snakes" from Sanskrit नाग (naga) meaning "snake" (also "elephant") combined with the name of the Hindu god INDRA, used here to mean "lord". This is another name for Vasuki, the king of snakes, in Hindu mythology.
NAHUM   m   Biblical
Means "comforter" in Hebrew. Nahum is one of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament. He authored the Book of Nahum in which the downfall of Nineveh is foretold.
NAİL   m   Turkish
Turkish form of NAIL.
NAIL   m   Arabic, Tatar
Means "attainer" in Arabic.
NAİLE   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NAILA.
NAİM   m   Turkish
Turkish form of NA'IM.
NAİME   f   Turkish
Turkish feminine form of NA'IM.
NAINSÍ   f   Irish
Irish form of NANCY.
NAIRA   f   Native American, Quechua, Aymara
Means "big eyes" in Quechua and Aymara.
NAND   m   Indian, Hindi
Modern northern Indian form of NANDA.
NANDA   m   Hinduism, Indian, Kannada, Tamil
Means "joy" in Sanskrit. In Hindu texts this is a name of both Vishnu and the foster-father of Krishna, as well as various other characters. In Buddhist texts this is the name of a god and a disciple of Buddha. Nanda was also the name of a 4th-century BC king who founded a dynasty in Magadha in India.
NANDAG   f   Scottish
Scottish diminutive of ANNA.
NANNA (1)   f   Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Possibly derived from Old Norse nanþ meaning "daring, brave". In Norse legend she was a goddess who died of grief when her husband Balder was killed.
NAOISE   m   Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology
Meaning unknown, presumably of Gaelic origin. In Irish legend he was the young man who eloped with Deirdre, the beloved of Conchobhar the king of Ulster. Conchobhar eventually succeeded in having Naoise murdered, which caused Deirdre to die of grief.
NAOMHÁN   m   Irish, Scottish
Means "little saint", derived from Irish naomh "saint" combined with a diminutive suffix.
NAOMI (1)   f   English, Hebrew, Biblical
From the Hebrew name נָעֳמִי (Na'omiy) meaning "pleasantness". In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother-in-law of Ruth. After the death of her husband and sons, she returned to Bethlehem with Ruth. There she declared that her name should be Mara (see Ruth 1:20).... [more]
NAOUM   m   Biblical Greek
Form of NAHUM used in the Greek Old Testament.
NAPOLÉON   m   French (Rare)
French form of NAPOLEON.
NAPOLEON   m   History, English
From the old Italian name Napoleone, used most notably by the French emperor Napoléon Bonaparte (1769-1821), who was born on Corsica. It is possibly derived from the Germanic Nibelungen, the name of a race of dwarfs in Germanic legend, which meant "sons of mist". Alternatively, it could be connected to the name of the Italian city of Napoli (Naples).
NARAYAN   m   Indian, Hindi, Nepali, Marathi, Odia, Bengali
Modern northern Indian form of NARAYANA.
NARAYANA   m   Hinduism, Indian, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil
Means "path of man" in Sanskrit. In Hindu belief this is the name of the god of creation, later synonymous with the god Brahma, and even later with Vishnu.
NARAYANAN   m   Indian, Malayalam, Tamil
Malayalam and Tamil variant of NARAYANA.
NARCÍS   m   Catalan
Catalan form of NARCISSUS. This is also the Catalan word for the narcissus flower.
NARCISA   f   Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian
Feminine form of NARCISSUS.
NARCISO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of NARCISSUS. This is also the word for the narcissus flower in those languages.
NARCISSE   m & f   French
French masculine and feminine form of NARCISSUS. This is also the French word for the narcissus flower.
NARCISSUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Late Roman, Biblical
Latinized form of Greek Ναρκισσος (Narkissos), possibly derived from ναρκη (narke) meaning "sleep, numbness". Narkissos was a beautiful youth in Greek mythology who stared at his own reflection for so long that he eventually died and was turned into the narcissus flower.... [more]
NARCYZ   m   Polish
Polish form of NARCISSUS. This is also the Polish word for the narcissus flower.
NASIM   m & f   Arabic, Urdu
Means "breeze" in Arabic.
NASRIN   f   Persian, Bengali
Means "wild rose" in Persian.
NATACHA   f   French, Portuguese
French and Portuguese form of NATASHA.
NATALE   m   Italian
Masculine form of NATALIA.
NATALI   f   Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of NATALIE.
NATÁLIA   f   Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATALIA   f   Polish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Georgian, Late Roman
Latinate form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATÁLIE   f   Czech
Czech form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATALIE   f   English, German
From the Late Latin name Natalia, which meant "Christmas Day" from Latin natale domini. This was the name of the wife of the 4th-century martyr Saint Adrian of Nicomedia. She is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, and the name has traditionally been more common among Eastern Christians than those in the West. It was popularized in America by actress Natalie Wood (1938-1981), who was born to Russian immigrants.
NATĀLIJA   f   Latvian
Latvian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATALIJA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Serbian, Croatian, Slovene and Macedonian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATALIO   m   Spanish
Masculine form of NATALIA.
NATALIYA   f   Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATALYA   f   Russian
Russian form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATANAEL   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of NATHANAEL.
NATANAELE   m   Italian
Italian form of NATHANAEL.
NATANAIL   m   Bulgarian, Macedonian
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of NATHANAEL.
NATAŠA   f   Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Macedonian
Serbian, Croatian, Slovene and Macedonian form of NATASHA.
NATASHA   f   Russian, English
Russian diminutive of NATALYA. This is the name of a character in Leo Tolstoy's novel 'War and Peace' (1865). It has been used in the English-speaking world only since the 20th century.
NATASZA   f   Polish
Polish form of NATASHA.
NATHÁLIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of Natalia (see NATALIE).
NATHALIE   f   French, German
French form and German variant of NATALIE.
NATHAN   m   English, French, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name נָתָן (Natan) meaning "he gave". In the Old Testament this is the name of a prophet during the reign of King David. He chastised David for his adultery with Bathsheba and for the death of Uriah the Hittite. Later he championed Solomon as David's successor. This was also the name of a son of David and Bathsheba.... [more]
NATHANAËL   m   French
French form of NATHANAEL.
NATHANAEL   m   Biblical, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name נְתַנְאֵל (Netan'el) meaning "God has given". It is borne by several minor characters in the Old Testament, typically spelled Nethanel or Nethaneel. In the New Testament this is the name of an apostle, probably another name of the apostle called Bartholomew.
NATHANAHEL   m   Biblical Latin
Form of NATHANAEL used in the Latin Bible.
NATHANIEL   m   English, Biblical
Variant of NATHANAEL. It has been regularly used in the English-speaking world since the Protestant Reformation. This has been the most popular spelling, even though the spelling Nathanael is found in most versions of the New Testament. The American writer Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), author of 'The Scarlet Letter', was a famous bearer of this name.
NATISHA   f   African American (Rare)
Variant of NATASHA, probably modeled on LATISHA.
NAUM   m   Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Russian and Bulgarian form of NAHUM.
NAVID   m   Persian, Arabic
Means "good news" in Persian.
NAYARA   f   Spanish
Spanish form of NAIARA.
NAZAIRE   m   French (Rare)
French form of Nazarius (see NAZARIO).
NAZAR   m   Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of Nazarius (see NAZARIO).
NAZARIO   m   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of the Late Latin name Nazarius, which meant "from Nazareth". Nazareth was the town in Galilee where Jesus lived.
NAZARIY   m   Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of Nazarius (see NAZARIO).
NAZLI   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NAZLI. This name is spelled with a Turkish dotless i, as Nazlı.
NAZZARENO   m   Italian
Italian form of the Late Latin Nazarenus, which meant "from Nazareth, Nazarene". Nazareth was the town in Galilee where Jesus lived. According to the New Testament, the phrase Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum meaning "Jesus the Nazarene, king of the Jews", was inscribed on the cross upon which Jesus was crucified.
NEA   f   Swedish, Finnish
Short form of LINNÉA.
NEACEL   m   Scottish
Scottish form of NICHOLAS.
NEBİL   m   Turkish
Turkish form of NABIL.
NEBİLE   f   Turkish
Turkish feminine form of NABIL.
NEBO   m   Biblical
Form of NABU used in the Old Testament.
NEBUCHADNEZZAR   m   Ancient Near Eastern (Anglicized), Biblical
From the Akkadian name Nabu-kudurri-usur meaning "NABU preserve my firstborn son". This name was borne by a 12th-century BC king of the Babylonian Empire. It was also borne by a 6th-century BC king of the Neo-Babylonian Empire. He captured Jerusalem, and ultimately destroyed the city's temple and deported many of its citizens, as told in the Old Testament.
NECHTAN   m   Irish Mythology, Ancient Celtic
Celtic name of uncertain meaning, possibly meaning "damp" (cognate with NEPTUNE). In Irish mythology Nechtan was the husband of Boand, the goddess of the River Boyne. This name was also borne by the 5th-century Saint Nectan of Hartland in Devon, who was supposedly born in Ireland. It was also the name of several kings of the Picts.
NECULAI   m   Romanian
Romanian variant form of NICHOLAS.
NEDA (2)   f   Persian
Persian form of NIDA.
NEDİM   m   Turkish
Turkish form of NADIM.
NEEMIAS   m   Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of NEHEMIAH used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
NEHEMIAH   m   Biblical
Means "comforted by YAHWEH" in Hebrew. According to the Book of Nehemiah in the Old Testament he was a leader of the Jews who was responsible for the rebuilding of Jerusalem after the return from the Babylonian captivity.
NEIFION   m   Welsh
Welsh form of NEPTUNE.
NEIL   m   Irish, Scottish, English
From the Gaelic name Niall, which is of disputed origin, possibly meaning "champion" or "cloud". This was the name of a semi-legendary 4th-century Irish king, Niall of the Nine Hostages.... [more]
NÉLIDA   f   Literature, Spanish
Created by French author Marie d'Agoult for her semi-autobiographical novel 'Nélida' (1846), written under the name Daniel Stern. It was probably an anagram of her pen name DANIEL.
NENSI   f   Croatian
Croatian form of NANCY.
NEOFIT   m   Bulgarian, Macedonian
Bulgarian and Macedonian form of NEOPHYTOS.
NEREUS   m   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Derived from Greek νηρος (neros) meaning "water". In Greek myth this was the name of a god of the sea, the father of the Nereids. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament, belonging to a Christian in Rome. This was also the name of a Roman saint of the 1st century, a member of the army, who was martyred with his companion Achilleus because they refused to execute Christians.
NERIAH   m   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lamp of YAHWEH" in Hebrew. This is the name of the father of Baruch in the Old Testament.
NERIO   m   Italian
Italian form of NEREUS.
NERSES   m   Armenian
Armenian form of Narseh (see NARSES). Saint Nerses was a 4th-century patriarch of the Armenian Church.
NERTHUS   f   Germanic Mythology
Latinized form of Nerþuz, the Germanic (feminine) equivalent of Njörðr (see NJORD). Nerthus was a Germanic goddess of fertility as described by the Roman historian Tacitus in the 1st century.
NES   f   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of AGNES.
NESİM   m & f   Turkish
Turkish form of NASIM.
NESRİN   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NASRIN.
NEST   f   Welsh
Welsh diminutive of AGNES.
NESTA   f   Welsh
Welsh diminutive of AGNES.
NESTAN   f   Georgian
From the first part of NESTAN-DAREJAN.
NESTANI   f   Georgian
From the second part of NESTAN-DAREJAN.
NESTOR   m   Greek Mythology, Russian
Means "homecoming" in Greek. In Homer's 'Iliad' this was the name of the king of Pylos, famous for his great wisdom and longevity, who acted as a counselor to the Greek allies.
NESTORE   m   Italian
Italian form of NESTOR.
NESTORI   m   Finnish
Finnish form of NESTOR.
NETHANEEL   m   Biblical
Form of NATHANAEL used in some versions of the Old Testament.
NETHANEL   m   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of NATHANAEL, also used in some versions of the English-language Old Testament.
NETHANIAH   m   Biblical
Means "YAHWEH has given" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the father of Ishmael (the assassin of Gedaliah), as well as other minor characters.
NETUNO   m   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of NEPTUNE.
NEVIO   m   Italian
Italian form of the Roman family name Naevius, which was derived from Latin naevus "mole (on the body)". A famous bearer was the 3rd-century BC Roman poet Gnaeus Naevius.
NEVRA   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NAWRA.
NEŽA   f   Slovene
Slovene form of AGNES.
NEZİH   m   Turkish
Turkish form of NAZIH.
NEZİHE   f   Turkish
Turkish feminine form of NAZIH.
NGAWANG   m & f   Tibetan, Bhutanese
Means "powerful speech" in Tibetan, from ངག (ngag) meaning "speech" and དབང (dbang) meaning "power, force".
NIA (1)   f   Welsh
Welsh form of NIAMH.
NIALL   m   Irish, Scottish
Original Gaelic spelling of NEIL.
NICCOLÒ   m   Italian
Italian form of NICHOLAS. A famous bearer was Niccolò Machiavelli, a 16th-century political philosopher from Florence.
NICÉPHORE   m   French (Rare)
French form of NIKEPHOROS.
NICHOLAS   m   English
From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.... [more]
NICODÈME   m   French
French form of NICODEMUS.
NICODEMO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of NICODEMUS.
NICODEMUS   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Greek name Νικοδημος (Nikodemos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and δημος (demos) "the people". This is the name of a character in the New Testament who helps Joseph of Arimathea entomb Jesus.
NICOL (1)   m   Scottish, Medieval English
Medieval English and Scottish form of NICHOLAS. This was the middle name of character in the novel 'Rob Roy' (1817) by Sir Walter Scott.
NICOL (2)   f   Dutch, German, Czech
Dutch, German and Czech variant of NICOLE.
NICOLA (1)   m   Italian
Italian form of NICHOLAS. A notable bearer was the 13th-century sculptor Nicola Pisano.
NICOLA (2)   f   German, Czech, English
Latinate feminine form of NICHOLAS. In the English-speaking world this name is more common outside of America, where Nicole is more usual.
NICOLAAS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of NICHOLAS.
NICOLAE   m   Romanian
Romanian form of NICHOLAS.
NICOLAO   m   Italian (Rare)
Italian variant form of NICHOLAS.
NICOLÁS   m   Spanish
Spanish form of NICHOLAS.
NICOLAS   m   French
French form of NICHOLAS.
NICOLAU   m   Portuguese, Galician, Catalan
Portuguese, Galician and Catalan form of NICHOLAS.
NICOLE   f   French, English, Dutch, German
French feminine form of NICHOLAS, commonly used in the English-speaking world since the middle of the 20th century. A famous bearer is American-Australian actress Nicole Kidman (1967-).
NICOLET   f   Dutch
Dutch feminine form of NICHOLAS.
NICOLÒ   m   Italian
Italian variant form of NICHOLAS.
NICOMEDE   m   Italian
Italian form of NIKOMEDES.
NICOSTRATO   m   Italian
Italian form of NIKOSTRATOS.
NİDA   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NIDA.
NIDA   f   Arabic, Urdu
Means "call, proclaim" in Arabic.
NIELS (1)   m   Danish
Danish form of NICHOLAS. A famous bearer was Niels Bohr (1885-1962), a Danish physicist who investigated the structure of atoms.
NIENKE   f   Frisian
Frisian diminutive of KATHERINE.
NIGUL   m   Estonian
Estonian form of NICHOLAS.
NIILO   m   Finnish
Finnish form of NICHOLAS.
NIKIFOR   m   Russian, Bulgarian, Macedonian
Russian, Bulgarian and Macedonian form of NIKEPHOROS.
NIKITA (1)   m   Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian
Russian form of NIKETAS. This form is also used in Ukrainian and Belarusian alongside the more traditional forms Mykyta and Mikita.
NIKLAS   m   Swedish, Finnish, Danish, Norwegian, German
Swedish form of NICHOLAS.
NIKLAUS   m   German (Swiss)
Swiss German form of NICHOLAS.
NIKO   m   Finnish, Croatian, Slovene
Finnish form of NICHOLAS, and a Croatian and Slovene short form of NIKOLA (1).
NIKODEM   m   Polish
Polish form of NICODEMUS.
NIKODIM   m   Russian, Macedonian
Russian and Macedonian form of NICODEMUS.
NIKOL   f   Czech, Bulgarian
Czech and Bulgarian form of NICOLE.
NIKOLA (2)   f   German, Polish, Czech, Slovak
German, Polish, Czech and Slovak feminine form of NICHOLAS.
NIKOLAAS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of NICHOLAS.
NIKOLAJ   m   Danish, Slovene
Danish and Slovene form of NICHOLAS.
NIKOLAJS   m   Latvian
Latvian form of NICHOLAS.
NIKOLAO   m   Esperanto
Esperanto form of NICHOLAS.
NIKOLAUS   m   German
German form of NICHOLAS.
NIKOLAY   m   Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian form of NICHOLAS. A notable bearer was the Russian novelist Nikolay Gogol (1809-1852).
NIKOLETT   f   Hungarian
Hungarian form of NICOLETTE.
NIKOLETTA   f   Hungarian, Greek
Hungarian and Greek form of NICOLETTA.
NIKOLOZ   m   Georgian
Georgian form of NICHOLAS.
NIKON   m   Ancient Greek, Russian
Derived from Greek νικη (nike) meaning "victory".
NIKORA   m & f   Maori
Maori form of NICHOLAS or NICOLE.
NILOFAR   f   Indian (Muslim)
Indian form of NILOOFAR.
NILOFER   f   Indian (Muslim)
Indian form of NILOOFAR.
NILS   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Scandinavian form of NICHOLAS.
NİLÜFER   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NILOFER.
NİMET   f   Turkish
Turkish form of NIMAT.
NINA (1)   f   Russian, Italian, English, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, Polish, Slovene, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian
Short form of names that end in nina, such as ANTONINA or GIANNINA. It was imported to Western Europe from Russia and Italy in the 19th century. This name also coincides with the Spanish word niña meaning "little girl".
NINA (4)   f   Russian
Russian form of NINO (2).
NINE   f   Frisian
Frisian short form of KATHERINE.
NINIAN   m   Scottish, Irish, Ancient Celtic
Meaning unknown. It appears in a Latinized form Niniavus, which could be from the Welsh name NYNNIAW. This was the name of a 5th-century British saint who was apparently responsible for many miracles and cures. He is known as the Apostle to the Picts.
NINO (2)   f   Ancient Near Eastern (Hellenized), Georgian
Meaning unknown, possibly related to the masculine name NINOS. Saint Nino (sometimes called Nina) was a woman from Asia Minor who introduced Christianity to Georgia in the 4th century.
NINOSLAV   m   Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
From a Slavic element, possibly nyni "now", combined with slava "glory".
NIOCLÁS   m   Irish
Irish form of NICHOLAS.
NISHAT   m & f   Arabic, Bengali
Means "energetic, lively" in Arabic.
NIVES   f   Italian, Croatian
Italian form of NIEVES.
NJÅL   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of NJÁLL.
NJÁLL   m   Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse form of Niall (see NEIL). This is the name of the hero of a 13th century Icelandic saga, based on the life of a 10th-century Icelandic chieftain.
NJORD   m   Norse Mythology, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From Old Norse Njörðr, which was possibly derived from the Indo-European root *ner meaning "strong, vigourous". Njord was the Norse god of the sea, sailing, fishing and fertility. With his children Freyr and Freya he was a member of the Vanir.
NOA (1)   f   Hebrew, Biblical
Hebrew form of NOAH (2).
NOACH   m   Hebrew, Dutch, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew and Dutch form of NOAH (1).
NOAH (1)   m   English, Biblical
Derived from the Hebrew name נֹחַ (Noach) meaning "rest, comfort". According to the Old Testament, Noah was the builder of the Ark that allowed him, his family, and animals of each species to survive the great Flood. After the Flood he received the sign of the rainbow as a covenant from God. He was the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth.... [more]
NOAH (2)   f   Biblical
Derived from the Hebrew name נֹעָה (No'ah) meaning "motion". In the Old Testament this is the name of a daughter of Zelophehad.
NOAK   m   Swedish
Swedish form of NOAH (1).
NOE   m   Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of NOAH (1) used in the Greek and Latin Bible.
NOÉ   m   French, Spanish, Portuguese
French, Spanish and Portuguese form of NOAH (1).
NOÈ   m   Italian
Italian form of NOAH (1).
NOEL   m   English
English form of NOËL.
NOELA   f   Galician
Galician feminine form of NOËL.
NOELIA   f   Spanish
Spanish feminine form of NOËL.
NOËLLE   f   French, Dutch
Feminine form of NOËL.
NOELLE   f   English
English form of NOËLLE.
NOÉMI   f   Hungarian
Hungarian form of NAOMI (1).
NOEMI   f   Italian, German, Czech, Biblical Latin
Italian, German and Czech form of NAOMI (1).
NOEMÍ   f   Spanish
Spanish form of NAOMI (1).
NOÉMIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of NAOMI (1).
NOÊMIA   f   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of NAOMI (1).
NOÉMIE   f   French
French form of NAOMI (1).
NOEMIN   f   Biblical Greek
Form of NAOMI (1) used in the Greek Old Testament.
NOGAH   m & f   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Means "brightness" in Hebrew. This is the name of a son of King David in the Old Testament. In modern times it is sometimes used as a feminine name.
NOHEMI   f   Spanish
Spanish form of NAOMI (1).
NOJUS   m   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of NOAH (1).
NÖL   m   Limburgish
Limburgish short form of ARNOLD.
NONA (2)   f   English, Ancient Roman (Rare)
Feminine form of NONUS. It was also used in 19th-century England, derived directly from Latin nonus "ninth" and traditionally given to the ninth-born child.
NONNA   f   Russian
Russian form of NONA (2).
NOOA   m   Finnish
Finnish form of NOAH (1).
NOOR (2)   f   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch and Limburgish short form of ELEONORA.
NOORTJE   f   Dutch, Limburgish
Dutch diminutive of ELEONORA.
NORBAER   m   Limburgish
Limburgish form of NORBERT. Its spelling has been influenced by the French pronunciation of Norbert.
NORBERT   m   German, English, Dutch, French, Hungarian, Polish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements nord "north" and beraht "bright". This was the name of an 11th-century German saint who made many reforms within the church.
NORBERTO   m   Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of NORBERT.
NORBU   m   Tibetan, Bhutanese
Means "jewel" in Tibetan.
NORMA   f   English, Italian, Literature
Created by Felice Romani for the main character in the opera 'Norma' (1831). He may have based it on Latin norma "rule". This name is also frequently used as a feminine form of NORMAN.
NORMAN   m   English, Ancient Germanic
From an old Germanic byname meaning "northman", referring to a Viking. The Normans were Vikings who settled on the coast of France, in the region that became known as Normandy. In England the name Norman or Normant was used before the Norman conquest, first as a nickname for Scandinavian settlers and later as a given name. After the Conquest it became more common, but died out around the 14th century. It was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to a character by this name in C. M. Yonge's novel 'The Daisy Chain' (1856).
NOSSON   m   Yiddish
Yiddish form of Natan (see NATHAN).
NUDD   m   Welsh Mythology
Welsh cognate of NUADA.
NUH   m   Arabic, Turkish
Arabic and Turkish form of NOAH (1).
NUÑO   m   Medieval Spanish
Spanish form of NUNO.
NUR   f & m   Arabic, Turkish, Urdu, Uyghur, Indonesian, Malay
Means "light" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition النور (al-Nur) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
NURETTİN   m   Turkish
Turkish form of NUR AD-DIN.
NÚRIA   f   Catalan, Portuguese
From a Catalan title of the Virgin Mary, Nostra Senyora de Núria, meaning "Our Lady of Nuria". Nuria is a sanctuary in Spain in which there is a shrine containing a famous statue of Mary.
NURIA   f   Spanish
Spanish form of NÚRIA.
NURUL   m & f   Arabic, Indonesian, Malay
First part of compound Arabic names beginning with نور ال (Nur al) meaning "light of the" (such as نور الدين (Nur al-Din) "light of religion").
NURULLAH   m   Arabic, Turkish
Means "light of ALLAH", from Arabic نور (nur) meaning "light" combined with الله (Allah).
NYDIA   f   English (Rare), Spanish, Literature
Used by British author Edward Bulwer-Lytton for a blind flower-seller in his novel 'The Last Days of Pompeii' (1834). He perhaps based it on Latin nidus "nest".
NYNKE   f   Frisian
Frisian diminutive of KATHERINE.
NYREE   f   English (New Zealand)
Anglicized form of NGAIRE. It was borne by New Zealand actress Nyree Dawn Porter (1936-2001).
OANEZ   f   Breton
Derived from Breton oan "lamb" (ultimately from Latin agnus) and used as a Breton form of AGNES.
OBADIAH   m   Biblical
Means "servant of YAHWEH" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve minor prophets, the author of the Book of Obadiah, which predicts the downfall of the nation of Edom.
OBED   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "servant, worshipper" in Hebrew. This is the name of several Old Testament characters including the grandfather of David.
OCTAVE   m   French
French form of OCTAVIUS.
OCTÁVIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of OCTAVIA.
OCTAVIA   f   English, Spanish, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.
OCTAVIAN   m   History, Romanian
From the Roman name Octavianus, which was derived from the name OCTAVIUS. After Gaius Octavius (later Roman emperor Augustus) was adopted by Julius Caesar he took the name Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus.
OCTÁVIO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of OCTAVIUS.
OCTAVIO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of OCTAVIUS.
ODA   f   German, Norwegian, Ancient Germanic
Feminine form of Odo (see OTTO).
ODALIS   f & m   Spanish
Spanish form of ODILIA.
ODD   m   Norwegian
Derived from Old Norse oddr meaning "point of a sword".
ODDO   m   Italian
Italian form of OTTO.
ODE   m   Medieval English
Medieval English form of Odo (see OTTO).
ODELIA   f   English
Form of ODILIA.
ODESSA   f   Various
From the name of a Ukrainian city that sits on the north coast of the Black Sea. This name can also be used as a feminine form of ODYSSEUS.
ODETA   f   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of ODETTE.
ODETTA   f   English (Rare)
Latinate form of ODETTE.
ODETTE   f   French
French diminutive of ODA or ODILIA. This is the name of a princess who has been transformed into a swan in the ballet 'Swan Lake' (1877) by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.
ODILE   f   French
French form of ODILIA.
ODILIE   f   German (Archaic)
Variant of ODILIA.
ODILON   m   French (Rare), Portuguese (Rare)
French masculine form of ODILIA.
ODIN   m   Norse Mythology, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn which was derived from óðr "inspiration, rage, frenzy". It ultimately developed from the early Germanic *Woðanaz. In Norse mythology Odin was the highest of the gods, presiding over art, war, wisdom and death. He resided in Valhalla, where warriors went after they were slain.
ÖDÖN   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of EDMUND.
OFÉLIA   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of OPHELIA.
OFELIA   f   Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of OPHELIA.
OFYDD   m   Welsh
Welsh form of OVID.
OHANNES   m   Armenian
Armenian form of Iohannes (see JOHN).
OILI   f   Finnish
Finnish form of OLGA.
ØIVIND   m   Norwegian
Variant of ØYVIND.
OKSANA   f   Ukrainian, Russian
Ukrainian form of XENIA.
OLAF   m   Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Polish
From the Old Norse name Áleifr meaning "ancestor's descendant", derived from the elements anu "ancestor" and leifr "descendant". This was the name of five kings of Norway, including Saint Olaf (Olaf II).
ÓLAFUR   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of OLAF.
OLALLA   f   Spanish
Spanish variant of EULALIA. This was the name of two 4th-century saints from Spain.
OLAV   m   Norwegian, Danish
Variant of OLAF.
OLAVI   m   Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of OLAF.
OLAVO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of OLAF.
ÓLAVUR   m   Faroese
Faroese form of OLAF.
OLDŘICH   m   Czech
Czech form of ULRICH.
OLDRICH   m   Slovak
Slovak form of ULRICH.
OLEG   m   Russian
Russian form of HELGE. The Varangians brought this name from Scandinavia to Russia. It was borne by an important 10th-century Grand Prince of Kiev.
OLEGÁRIO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of OLEGARIO.
OLEGARIO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of a Germanic name, possibly Aldegar, derived from the elements ald "old" and ger "spear". This was the name of a 12th-century saint, a bishop of Barcelona.
OLEKSANDR   m   Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of ALEXANDER.
OLEKSANDRA   f   Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of ALEXANDRA.
OLEKSIY   m   Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of ALEXIS.
OLENA   f   Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of HELEN.
OLEV   m   Estonian
Estonian form of OLAF.
OĽGA   f   Slovak
Slovak form of OLGA.
OLGA   f   Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, Grand Prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
OLGICA   f   Macedonian, Serbian
Macedonian and Serbian diminutive of OLGA.
OLHA   f   Ukrainian
Ukrainian form of OLGA.
OLIVÉR   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of OLIVER.
OLIVER   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
OLÍVIA   f   Portuguese, Slovak, Hungarian
Portuguese, Slovak and Hungarian form of OLIVIA.
OLIVIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was first used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy 'Twelfth Night' (1602). Shakespeare may have based it on OLIVER or OLIVA, or perhaps directly on the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario.... [more]
OLIVIE   f   French (Rare), Czech (Rare)
French and Czech form of OLIVIA.
OLIVIER   m   French, Dutch
French and Dutch form of OLIVER.
OLIVIERO   m   Italian
Italian form of OLIVER.
OLIWER   m   Polish (Rare)
Polish form of OLIVER.
OLIWIA   f   Polish
Polish form of OLIVIA.
OLIWIER   m   Polish (Rare)
Polish form of OLIVER.
OLOF   m   Swedish
Swedish form of OLAF.
OLOV   m   Swedish
Swedish form of OLAF.
OLUF   m   Danish
Danish variant of OLAF.
OLYMPE   f   French
French form of OLYMPIAS.
OLYMPIA   f   Greek, Slovak
Feminine form of OLYMPOS.
OMAR (1)   m   Arabic, English
Variant transcription of UMAR. This is the usual English spelling of the 12th-century poet Umar Khayyam's name. In his honour it has sometimes been used in the English-speaking world, notably for the American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
ÖMER   m   Turkish
Turkish form of UMAR.
OMRI   m   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Possibly means "life" or "servant" in Hebrew (or a related Semitic language). This was the name of a 9th-century BC military commander who became king of Israel. He appears in the Old Testament, where he is denounced as being wicked.
ONA (1)   f   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of ANNA.
ONDINA   f   Portuguese, Italian
Portuguese and Italian form of UNDINE.
ONDŘEJ   m   Czech
Czech form of ANDREW.
ONDREJ   m   Slovak
Slovak form of ANDREW.
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