Names with Relationship "from different language"

This is a list of names in which the relationship is from different language.
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FRANČIŠKA   f   Slovene
Slovene feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANCISKA   f   Hungarian
Hungarian feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANCISQUE   m   French
French variant of Franciscus (see FRANCIS), now somewhat archaic.
FRANCISZEK   m   Polish
Polish form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANCISZKA   f   Polish
Polish feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANCK   m   French
French form of FRANK (1).
FRANÇOIS   m   French
French form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS). François Villon was a French lyric poet of the 15th century. This was also the name of two kings of France.
FRANÇOISE   f   French
Feminine form of FRANÇOIS.
FRANE   m   Croatian
Croatian form of FRANCIS.
FRANG   m   Scottish
Scottish form of FRANCIS.
FRANJO   m   Croatian, Serbian
Croatian and Serbian form of FRANCIS.
FRANK (1)   m   English, German, Dutch, French
From a Germanic name which referred to a member of the Germanic tribe, the Franks. The Franks settled in the regions now called France and the Netherlands in the 3rd and 4th century. They derived their tribal name from the name of a type of spear that they used. From medieval times, the various forms of this name have been commonly conflated with the various forms of Francis.... [more]
FRANKA (2)   f   Croatian
Croatian form of FRANCA.
FRANKO   m   Croatian
Croatian form of FRANCO (2).
FRANO   m   Croatian
Croatian form of FRANCIS.
FRANS   m   Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish
Dutch, Scandinavian and Finnish form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRAÑSEZ   m   Breton
Breton form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRAÑSEZA   f   Breton
Breton feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANTIŠEK   m   Czech
Czech form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANTIŠKA   f   Czech
Czech feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANTZISKA   f   Basque
Basque feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANTZISKO   m   Basque
Basque form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRANZ   m   German
German form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS). This name was borne by the influential author Franz Kafka (1883-1924), writer of 'The Trial' and 'The Castle' among other works. Also, rulers of Austria and the Holy Roman Empire have had this name.
FRANZISKA   f   German
German feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).
FRÉDÉRIC   m   French
French form of FREDERICK.
FREDERICK   m   English
English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, power". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia. Notables among these rulers include the 12th-century Holy Roman Emperor and crusader Frederick I Barbarossa, the 13th-century emperor and patron of the arts Frederick II, and the 18th-century Frederick II of Prussia, known as Frederick the Great.... [more]
FREDERICO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of FREDERICK.
FREDERIK   m   Danish, Dutch
Danish and Dutch form of FREDERICK. This was the name of nine kings of Denmark over the past 500 years, alternating each generation with the name Christian.
FREDIANO   m   Italian
Italian form of the Roman name Frigidianus, which was derived from Latin frigidus "cold". This was the name of a 6th-century Irish bishop who made a pilgrimage to Rome and settled as a hermit on Mount Pisano.
FREDRIK   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish
Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish form of FREDERICK. This was the name of a 18th-century king of Sweden.
FREJ   m   Danish, Swedish, German
Danish, Swedish and German form of FREYR.
FREJA   f   Danish, Swedish, German
Danish, Swedish and German form of FREYA.
FRENS   m   Limburgish
Limburgish form of FRANCIS.
FREYA   f   Norse Mythology, English (British, Modern)
From Old Norse Freyja meaning "lady". This was the name of the goddess of love, beauty, war and death in Norse mythology. She claimed half of the heroes who were slain in battle and brought them to her realm of Fólkvangr. Along with her brother Freyr and father Njord, she was one of the Vanir (as opposed to the Æsir). Some scholars connect her with the goddess Frigg.... [more]
FREYJA   f   Icelandic, Norse Mythology
Icelandic and Old Norse form of FREYA.
FREYR   m   Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "lord" in Old Norse. This was the name of a Norse god. He may have originally been called Yngvi, with the name Freyr being his title. Freyr presided over fertility, sunlight and rain, and was the husband of the frost giantess Gerd. With his twin sister Freya and father Njord he was one of the group of deities called the Vanir.
FRICIS   m   Latvian
Latvian form of FREDERICK.
FRIDA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, originally a short form of other feminine names containing the Germanic element frid meaning "peace". This is also the Scandinavian equivalent, from the Old Norse cognate Fríða. A famous bearer was Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-1954).
FRIDERIK   m   Slovene
Slovene form of FREDERICK.
FRĪDRIHS   m   Latvian
Latvian form of FREDERICK.
FRIDTJOF   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Variant of FRITJOF.
FRIEDA   f   German, English
Variant of FRIDA.
FRIEDEMANN   m   German
Means "man of peace" from the Germanic elements frid "peace" and man "man".
FRIEDHELM   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements frid "peace" and helm "helmet, protection".
FRIEDHOLD   m   German
Means "peaceful ruler", derived from the Germanic elements frid "peace" and wald "rule".
FRIEDRICH   m   German
German form of FREDERICK. This was the name of kings of Germany. The socialist Friedrich Engels (1820-1895) and the philosopher Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) are two famous bearers of this name.
FRIGE   f   Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Anglo-Saxon cognate of FRIGG.
FRIGYES   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of FREDERICK.
FRÍÐA   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse cognate of FRIDA, also in part derived from Old Norse fríðr meaning "beautiful, beloved".
FRIÐRIK   m   Icelandic
Icelandic form of FREDERICK.
FRITJOF   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Friðþjófr meaning "thief of peace", derived from the elements friðr "peace" and þjófr "thief".
FRODE   m   Danish, Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Fróði, which was derived from fróðr meaning "learned, wise".
FRONA   f   English
Diminutive of SOPHRONIA.
FROSINA   f   Macedonian
Macedonian form of EUPHROSYNE.
FRØYA   f   Norwegian
Norwegian form of FREYA.
FRYDERYK   m   Polish
Polish form of FREDERICK.
FUAT   m   Turkish
Turkish form of FUAD.
FULBERT   m   French, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements fulc "people" and beraht "bright". Saint Fulbert was an 11th-century bishop of Chartres.
FULGENCIO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of the Late Latin name Fulgentius, which meant "shining" from Latin fulgens. Saint Fulgentius was a 6th-century bishop from Tunisia who was a friend of Saint Augustine.
FULGENZIO   m   Italian
Italian form of Fulgentius (see FULGENCIO).
FULK   m   English (Archaic)
From the Germanic name Fulco, a short form of various names beginning with the element fulc "people". The Normans brought this name to England, though it is now very rare.
FULKE   m   English (Archaic)
Variant of FULK.
FÜLÖP   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of PHILIP.
FULVIA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Fulvius (see FULVIO).
FÚLVIO   m   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of Fulvius (see FULVIO).
FULVIO   m   Italian
Italian form of the Roman family name Fulvius, which was derived from Latin fulvus "yellow, tawny".
FUNS   m   Dutch, Limburgish
Short form of ALFONS.
FYODOR   m   Russian
Russian form of THEODORE. It was borne by three tsars of Russia. Another notable bearer was Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881), the Russian author of such works as 'Crime and Punishment' and 'The Brothers Karamazov'.
GABIJA   f   Lithuanian, Baltic Mythology
Probably from Lithuanian gaubti meaning "to cover". In Lithuanian mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire and the home.
GABIN   m   French
French form of Gabinus (see GAVINO).
GABINO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of Gabinus (see GAVINO).
GÁBOR   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of GABRIEL.
GÁBRIEL   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of GABRIEL.
GABRIËL   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GABRIEL.
GABRIEL   m   French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man". Gabriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Qur'an to Muhammad.... [more]
GABRIELE (1)   m   Italian
Italian form of GABRIEL.
GABRIELIUS   m   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of GABRIEL.
GABRIELLE   f   French, English
French feminine form of GABRIEL. This was the real name of French fashion designer Coco Chanel (1883-1971).
GABRIELS   m   Latvian
Latvian form of GABRIEL.
GABRIJEL   m   Croatian, Slovene
Croatian and Slovene form of GABRIEL.
GAËL   m   French, Breton
Meaning uncertain. It possibly derives from the ethno-linguistic term Gael, which refers to speakers of Gaelic languages. Alternatively it may be a variant of GWENAËL.
GAËLLE   f   French, Breton
Feminine form of GAËL.
GAENOR   f   Welsh
Welsh variant of GAYNOR.
GAÉTAN   m   French
French form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
GAËTAN   m   French
French form of Caietanus (see GAETANO).
GAETANO   m   Italian
Italian form of the Latin name Caietanus, which meant "from Caieta". Caieta (now called Gaeta) was a town in ancient Italy, its name deriving either from Kaiadas, the name a Greek location where prisoners were executed, or else from Caieta, the name of the nurse of Aeneas. This was the name of a 16th-century Italian saint.
GAIA   f   Greek Mythology, Italian
From the Greek word γαια (gaia), a parallel form of γη (ge) meaning "earth". In Greek mythology Gaia was the mother goddess who presided over the earth. She was the mate of Uranus and the mother of the Titans and the Cyclopes.
GAIOS   m   Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek
Greek form of GAIUS.
GAIOZ   m   Georgian
Georgian form of GAIUS.
GAIUS   m   Ancient Roman, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Roman praenomen, or given name, of uncertain meaning. It is possibly derived from Latin gaudere "to rejoice", though it may be of unknown Etruscan origin. This was a very common Roman praenomen, the most famous bearers being Gaius Julius Caesar, the great leader of the Roman Republic, and his adopted son Gaius Octavius (later known as Augustus), the first Roman emperor. This name also appears in the New Testament belonging to a bishop of Ephesus who is regarded as a saint.
GAJA (1)   f   Slovene, Polish
Either a form of GAIA or a feminine form of GAIUS.
GAL (2)   m   Slovene
Slovene form of GALLUS.
GALEN   m   English
Modern form of the Greek name Γαληνος (Galenos), which meant "calm" from Greek γαληνη (galene). It was borne by a 2nd-century BC Greco-Roman physician who contributed to anatomy and medicine. In modern times the name is occasionally given in his honour.
GALENA   f   Bulgarian, Macedonian
Bulgarian and Macedonian feminine form of Galenos (see GALEN).
GALINA   f   Russian, Bulgarian
Russian and Bulgarian feminine form of Galenos (see GALEN).
GALİP   m   Turkish
Turkish form of GHALIB.
GALLAGHER   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Gallchobhair meaning "descendant of GALLCHOBHAR".
GALLO   m   Italian
Italian form of GALLUS.
GALO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of GALLUS.
GANIX   m   Basque
Basque form of JOHN.
GARETH   m   Welsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown. It first appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends 'Le Morte d'Arthur', in which Gareth was a Knight of the Round Table, the brother of Sir Gawain. Malory based the name on Gahariet, which was the name of a similar Arthurian character in French sources. It may ultimately have a Welsh origin, possibly related to gwaredd meaning "gentleness".
GARGI   f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Bengali
Meaning unknown. This was the name of a 7th-century BC Indian philosopher who appears in the Upanishads, which are parts of Hindu scripture.
GÁSPÁR   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of JASPER.
GASPAR   m   Spanish, Portuguese, Judeo-Christian Legend
Spanish and Portuguese form of JASPER, as well as the Latin form.
GASPARD   m   French
French form of JASPER.
GASPARE   m   Italian
Italian form of JASPER.
GASPARO   m   Italian
Italian form of JASPER.
GAŠPER   m   Slovene
Slovene form of JASPER.
GASTÓN   m   Spanish
Spanish form of GASTON.
GASTON   m   French
Possibly from a Germanic name derived from the element gast meaning "stranger, guest". This is the usual French name for Saint Vedastus, called Vaast in Flemish, and alternatively the name may be connected to it. The name was also borne by several counts of Foix-Béarn, beginning in the 13th century.
GASTONE   m   Italian
Italian form of GASTON.
GAUBERT   m   French
French form of the Germanic name Waldobert, composed of the elements wald "rule" and beraht "bright". This was the name of a 7th-century French saint.
GAULTIER   m   French
French form of WALTER.
GAURI   f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "white" in Sanskrit. This is a Hindu goddess, another name of the wife of Shiva, so named because of her fair complexion.
GAUTAM   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali
Modern form of GAUTAMA.
GAUTHIER   m   French
French form of WALTER.
GAUTIER   m   French
French form of WALTER.
GAVIN   m   English, Scottish
Medieval form of GAWAIN. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.
GAVINO   m   Italian
From the Late Latin name Gabinus, which possibly referred to the ancient city of Gabii in central Italy. Saint Gavino was martyred in Sardinia in the 3rd century.
GAVRAIL   m   Bulgarian
Bulgarian form of GABRIEL.
GAVRIIL   m   Russian, Greek
Russian and Greek form of GABRIEL.
GAVRIILU   m   Old Church Slavic
Old Slavic form of GABRIEL.
GAVRIL   m   Bulgarian, Macedonian, Romanian
Bulgarian, Macedonian and Romanian form of GABRIEL.
GAVRILO   m   Serbian
Serbian form of GABRIEL.
GAWAIN   m   Welsh, Arthurian Romance
Meaning uncertain, from the Latin form Walganus used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth. This was the name of a nephew of King Arthur and one of the Knights of the Round Table in Arthurian legend. He can be identified with the earlier Welsh hero Gwalchmei, and it is likely that the name derives from GWALCHMEI. Alternatively it may have a different Celtic or even a Germanic origin. Gawain was a popular hero in medieval stories such as the 14th-century romantic poem 'Sir Gawain and the Green Knight'.
GAWEŁ   m   Polish
Polish form of GALLUS.
GAYATHRI   f   Tamil, Indian, Kannada, Malayalam, Telugu
South Indian variant of GAYATRI.
GAYATRI   f   Hinduism, Indian, Marathi, Hindi
From Sanskrit गायत्र (gayatra) which refers to a type of song or hymn with a particular meter. It is also the name of a Hindu goddess who is a personification of this song.
GAYNOR   f   English (British)
Medieval form of GUINEVERE.
GEARALT   m   Irish
Irish form of GERALD.
GEARÓID   m   Irish
Irish form of GERARD or GERALD.
GEBHARD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element geb "gift" combined with hard "brave, hardy". Saint Gebhard was a 10th-century bishop of Constance.
GEDALIAH   m   Biblical
Means "YAHWEH is great" in Hebrew. This was the name of several characters in the Old Testament, including the governor of Judah appointed by Nebuchadnezzar.
GEDEON   m   Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of GIDEON used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
GEERTRUIDA   f   Dutch
Dutch form of GERTRUDE.
GEEVARGHESE   m   Indian, Malayalam
Malayalam form of GEORGE, used by Saint Thomas Christians in the Indian state of Kerala.
GEIR   m   Norwegian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse element geirr meaning "spear".
GELLÉRT   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of GERARD. Saint Gellért was an 11th-century missionary to Hungary who was martyred by being thrown into the Danube.
GELTRUDE   f   Italian
Italian form of GERTRUDE.
GEMA   f   Spanish
Spanish form of GEMMA.
GEMARIAH   m   Biblical
Means "YAHWEH has accomplished" in Hebrew. This was the name of a friend of Jeremiah in the Old Testament.
GEMMA   f   Italian, Catalan, English (British), Dutch
Medieval Italian nickname meaning "gem, precious stone". It was borne by the wife of the 13th-century Italian poet Dante Alighieri.
GENADI   m   Bulgarian, Georgian
Bulgarian and Georgian form of GENNADIUS.
GENEVIÈVE   f   French
From the medieval name Genovefa, which is of uncertain origin. It could be derived from the Germanic elements kuni "kin, family" and wefa "wife, woman". Alternatively it could be of Gaulish origin, from the related Celtic element genos "kin, family" combined with a second element of unknown meaning. This name was borne by Saint Geneviève, the patron saint of Paris, who inspired the city to resist the Huns in the 5th century.
GENEVIEVE   f   English
English form of GENEVIÈVE.
GENEVRA   f   Various
Variant of GINEVRA.
GENNADIY   m   Russian
Russian form of GENNADIUS.
GENNARO   m   Italian
Italian form of JANUARIUS.
GENOVEFFA   f   Italian
Italian form of GENEVIÈVE.
GENOVEVA   f   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of GENEVIÈVE.
GENOWEFA   f   Polish
Polish form of GENEVIÈVE.
GEOFFREY   m   English, French
From a Norman French form of a Germanic name. The second element is Germanic frid "peace", but the first element may be either gawia "territory", walha "foreign" or gisil "hostage". It is possible that two or more names merged into a single form. In the later Middle Ages Geoffrey was further confused with the distinct name Godfrey.... [more]
GEOFFROI   m   Medieval French
Medieval French form of GEOFFREY.
GEORG   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian
Form of GEORGE. This name was borne by the German idealist philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831).
GEORGE   m   English, Romanian
From the Greek name Γεωργιος (Georgios) which was derived from the Greek word γεωργος (georgos) meaning "farmer, earthworker", itself derived from the elements γη (ge) "earth" and εργον (ergon) "work". Saint George was a 3rd-century Roman soldier from Palestine who was martyred during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian. Later legends describe his defeat of a dragon, with which he was often depicted in medieval art.... [more]
GEORGEI   m   Medieval Slavic
Old Slavic form of GEORGE.
GEORGENE   f   English
Variant of GEORGINE.
GEORGES   m   French
French form of GEORGE. This name was borne by the French artists Georges Seurat (1859-1891) and Georges Braque (1882-1963).
GEORGI   m   Bulgarian
Bulgarian form of GEORGE.
GEORGIJS   m   Latvian
Latvian form of GEORGE.
GEORGINA   f   English, Dutch, German, Spanish
Feminine form of GEORGE.
GEORGIY   m   Russian
Russian form of GEORGE.
GEORGO   m   Esperanto
Esperanto form of GEORGE.
GEORGS   m   Latvian
Latvian form of GEORGE.
GERAINT   m   Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown, possibly a Welsh form of GERONTIUS. This was the name of a figure various Welsh legends. He was also incorporated into later Arthurian tales as one of the Knights of the Round Table and the husband of Enid.
GÉRALD   m   French
French form of GERALD.
GERALD   m   English, German
From a Germanic name meaning "rule of the spear", from the elements ger "spear" and wald "rule". The Normans brought this name to Britain. Though it died out in England during the Middle Ages, it remained common in Ireland. It was revived in the English-speaking world in 19th century.
GERALDO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of GERALD.
GERALLT   m   Welsh
Welsh form of GERALD.
GÉRARD   m   French
French form of GERARD.
GERARD   m   English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It was initially much more common than the similar name Gerald, with which it was often confused, but it is now less common.
GERARDO   m   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of GERARD.
GERASIM   m   Russian, Macedonian
Russian and Macedonian form of GERASIMOS.
GÉRAUD   m   French
French form of GERALD.
GERBEN   m   Dutch
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and bern "bear".
GERD (2)   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse garðr meaning "enclosure". In Norse myth Gerd was a fertility goddess, a frost giantess who was the wife of Freyr.
GEREON   m   German, Late Roman
Possibly derived from Greek γερων (geron) meaning "old man, elder". This was the name of a saint martyred in Cologne in the 4th century.
GERFRIED   m   German
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and frid "peace".
GERGELY   m   Hungarian
Hungarian form of GREGORY.
GERHARD   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Ancient Germanic
German, Dutch and Scandinavian form of GERARD.
GERHARDT   m   German
German form of GERARD.
GERHILD   f   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and hild "battle".
GERHOLD   m   German (Archaic)
German form of GERALD.
GERLACH   m   Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with laic "play". Saint Gerlach was a 12th-century Dutch soldier who became a hermit.
GERLINDE   f   German, Dutch
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with linde "soft, tender".
GERLOF   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GERULF.
GERMAIN   m   French
French form of GERMANUS.
GERMAINE   f   French
French feminine form of GERMAIN. Saint Germaine was a 16th-century peasant girl from France.
GERMÁN   m   Spanish
Spanish form of GERMANUS.
GERMAN (1)   m   English
English form of GERMANUS.
GERMAN (2)   m   Russian
Russian form of HERMAN.
GERMANA   f   Italian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of GERMANUS.
GERMANO   m   Italian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of GERMANUS.
GERMOGEN   m   Russian
Russian form of HERMOGENES.
GERNOT   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and hnod "crush".
GERO   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear".
GEROLAMO   m   Italian
Italian form of JEROME.
GEROLD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of GERALD.
GEROLF   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GERULF.
GEROLT   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GERALD.
GERÓNIMO   m   Spanish
Variant of JERÓNIMO.
GERRIT   m   Dutch, Frisian
Dutch and Frisian form of GERARD.
GERSHOM   m   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Probably means "exile" in Hebrew, though the Bible explains that it derives from גֵּר שָׁם (ger sham) meaning "a stranger there" (see Exodus 18:3). This is the name of a son of Moses in the Old Testament.
GERSHON   m   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Variant of GERSHOM. This is the name of a son of Levi in the Old Testament.
GERTRAUD   f   German
German form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRÚD   f   Hungarian
Hungarian form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUD   f   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRÚDA   f   Slovak
Slovak form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRŪDA   f   Lithuanian
Lithuanian form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUDA   f   Polish, Czech
Polish and Czech form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUDE   f   English, Dutch
Means "spear of strength", derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and thrud "strength". Saint Gertrude the Great was a 13th-century nun and mystic writer. It was probably introduced to England by settlers from the Low Countries in the 15th century. Shakespeare used the name in his play 'Hamlet' (1600) for the mother of the title character. A famous bearer was the American writer Gertrude Stein (1874-1946).
GERTRUDES   f   Portuguese
Portuguese form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUDIS   f   Spanish
Latinized form of GERTRUDE.
GERTRUIDA   f   Dutch
Dutch form of GERTRUDE.
GERULF   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from Germanic ger "spear" and wulf "wolf".
GERVAIS   m   French
French form of GERVASIUS.
GERVAS   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of GERVASIUS.
GERVASE   m   English (Rare)
English form of GERVASIUS. The Normans introduced this name to England in the Middle Ages, though it has since become rare.
GERVÁSIO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of GERVASIUS.
GERVASIO   m   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of GERVASIUS.
GERWAZY   m   Polish
Polish form of GERVASIUS.
GESSICA   f   Italian
Italian variant of JESSICA.
GEVORG   m   Armenian
Armenian form of GEORGE.
GHENADIE   m   Romanian
Romanian form of GENNADIUS.
GHEORGHE   m   Romanian
Romanian form of GEORGE.
GHERARDO   m   Italian (Archaic)
Italian variant of GERARDO.
GHISLAIN   m   French
French form of Gislenus, a Latinized form of the Germanic name Gislin, derived from the element gisil meaning "hostage" or "pledge". This was the name of a 7th-century Belgian saint.
GHJULIA   f   Corsican
Corsican form of JULIA.
GHJUVAN   m   Corsican
Corsican form of JOHN.
GHOLAM   m   Persian
Persian form of GHULAM.
GHULAM   m   Arabic, Urdu, Pashto
Means "servant, boy" in Arabic. It is often used as the first part of compound names.
GIACINTO   m   Italian
Italian form of HYACINTHUS.
GIACOBBE   m   Italian
Italian form of Iacobus (see JACOB).
GIACOMO   m   Italian
Italian form of Iacomus (see JAMES).
GIDEON   m   Biblical, English, Hebrew
Means "feller" or "hewer" in Hebrew. Gideon is a hero and judge of the Old Testament. He led the vastly outnumbered Israelites against the Midianites, defeated them, and killed their two kings. In the English-speaking world, Gideon has been used as a given name since the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular among the Puritans.
GIDIE   m   Medieval French
Medieval French form of Aegidius (see GILES).
GIJSBERT   m   Dutch
Dutch variant of GISBERT.
GIL (1)   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of GILES.
GILBERT   m   English, French, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright pledge", derived from the Germanic elements gisil "pledge, hostage" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to England, where it was common during the Middle Ages. It was borne by a 12th-century British saint, the founder of the religious order known as the Gilbertines.
GILBERTO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of GILBERT.
GILDA   f   Italian, Portuguese
Originally an Italian short form of names containing the Germanic element gild meaning "sacrifice, value".
GILEAD   m   Biblical
From an Old Testament place name meaning "monument of testimony" in Hebrew. This was a mountainous region east of the Jordan River. Besides being a place name, it is also borne by people in the Bible.
GILES   m   English
From the Late Latin name Aegidius, which is derived from Greek αιγιδιον (aigidion) meaning "young goat". Saint Giles was an 8th-century miracle worker who came to southern France from Greece. He is regarded as the patron saint of the crippled. In Old French the name Aegidius became Gidie and then Gilles, at which point it was imported to England.
GILLIS   m   Dutch
Dutch form of GILES.
GILROY   m   Irish, Scottish
From an Irish surname, either Mac Giolla Ruaidh, which means "son of the red-haired servant", or Mac Giolla Rí, which means "son of the king's servant".
GINEVRA   f   Italian
Italian form of GUINEVERE. This is also the Italian name for the city of Geneva, Switzerland. It is also sometimes associated with the Italian word ginepro meaning "juniper".
GIOACCHINO   m   Italian
Italian form of JOACHIM.
GIOACHINO   m   Italian
Italian form of JOACHIM. A famous bearer was the Italian composer Gioachino Rossini (1792-1868).
GIOCONDA   f   Italian
From the Late Latin name Iucunda which meant "pleasant, delightful, happy". Leonardo da Vinci's painting the 'Mona Lisa' is also known as 'La Gioconda' because its subject is Lisa del Giocondo.
GIOELE   m   Italian
Italian form of JOEL.
GIONATA   m   Italian
Italian form of JONATHAN.
GIORDANO   m   Italian
Italian form of JORDAN.
GIORGI   m   Georgian
Georgian form of GEORGE. This was the name of several kings of Georgia.
GIORGIO   m   Italian
Italian form of GEORGE.
GIOSETTA   f   Italian
Perhaps an Italian form of JOSETTE.
GIOSUÈ   m   Italian
Italian form of JOSHUA.
GIOVANNA   f   Italian
Italian form of Iohanna (see JOANNA), making it the feminine form of GIOVANNI.
GIOVANNI   m   Italian
Italian form of Iohannes (see JOHN). The Renaissance painter Giovanni Bellini (1430-1516) and the painter and sculptor Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini (1598-1680) were two famous bearers of this name.
GIRALDO   m   Italian
Italian form of GERALD.
GIRISH   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam
Modern form of GIRISHA.
GIROLAMO   m   Italian
Italian form of JEROME.
GISBERT   m   German, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name in which the second element is beraht "bright". The first element is probably a shortened form of gisil "pledge, hostage" (making it a variant of GILBERT), though it could be related to Gallo-Celtic gaiso "spear".
GISELA   f   German, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese
German, Dutch, Spanish and Portuguese form of GISELLE.
GISÈLE   f   French
French form of GISELLE.
GISELLA   f   Italian
Italian form of GISELLE.
GISELLE   f   French, English (Modern)
Derived from the Germanic word gisil meaning "hostage" or "pledge". This name may have originally been a descriptive nickname for a child given as a pledge to a foreign court. It was borne by a daughter of the French king Charles III who married the Norman leader Rollo in the 10th century. The name was popular in France during the Middle Ages (the more common French form is Gisèle). Though it became known in the English-speaking world due to Adolphe Adam's ballet 'Giselle' (1841), it was not regularly used until the 20th century.
GIUDITTA   f   Italian
Italian form of JUDITH.
GIULIA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of JULIUS.
GIULIANA   f   Italian
Feminine form of GIULIANO.
GIULIANO   m   Italian
Italian form of Iulianus (see JULIAN).
GIULIO   m   Italian
Italian form of JULIUS.
GIUSEPPE   m   Italian
Italian form of JOSEPH. Giuseppe Garibaldi (1807-1882) was a military leader who united Italy in the 19th century.
GIUSTINA   f   Italian
Italian feminine form of JUSTIN.
GIUSTINO   m   Italian
Italian form of JUSTIN.
GIZELLA   f   Hungarian
Hungarian form of GISELLE.
GJERGJ   m   Albanian
Albanian form of GEORGE.
GJON   m   Albanian
Albanian form of JOHN.
GJORD   m   Swedish (Rare)
Contracted form of GUÐFRIÐR.
GJORGJI   m   Macedonian
Macedonian form of GEORGE.
GJURD   m   Norwegian (Rare)
Contracted form of GUÐFRIÐR.
GLADYS   f   Welsh, English
From the old Welsh name Gwladus, possibly derived from gwlad "country". It has historically been used as a Welsh form of CLAUDIA. This name became popular outside of Wales after it was used in Ouida's novel 'Puck' (1870).
GLÁUCIA   f   Portuguese
Feminine form of GLÁUCIO.
GLÁUCIO   m   Portuguese
Portuguese form of the Roman cognomen Glaucia, which was derived from Latin glaucus "bluish grey", ultimately from Greek.
GLAUCO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of GLAUCUS.
GLEB   m   Russian, Ukrainian
Russian and Ukrainian form of the Old Norse name Guðleifr, which was derived from the elements guð "god" and leifr "heir".
GLENDA   f   Welsh, English
A name created in the 20th century from the Welsh elements glân "pure, clean" and da "good".
GLIGOR   m   Macedonian
Macedonian form of GREGORY.
GOBINDA   m   Bengali
Bengali form of GOVINDA.
GODEFROY   m   French
French form of Godafrid (see GODFREY).
GODELIEVE   f   Dutch
Dutch (Flemish) form of GODELIVA.
GODFREY   m   English
From the Germanic name Godafrid, which meant "peace of god" from the Germanic elements god "god" and frid "peace". The Normans brought this name to England, where it became common during the Middle Ages. A notable bearer was Godfrey of Bouillon, an 11th-century leader of the First Crusade and the first ruler of the Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem.
GODFRIED   m   Dutch
Dutch cognate of Godafrid (see GODFREY).
GODOFREDO   m   Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of GODFREY.
GODTFRED   m   Norwegian
Norwegian form of GODFREY.
GOFFREDO   m   Italian
Italian form of GODFREY.
GOFRAIDH   m   Irish
Irish form of GODFREY.
GOLIATH   m   Biblical
Possibly means "uncovered" in Hebrew. This is the name of the giant Philistine who is slain by David in the Old Testament.
GOLNARA   f   Tatar
Tatar form of GOLNAR.
GONCA   f   Turkish
Turkish form of GHONCHEH.
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