Names with Relationship "latinized"

This is a list of names in which the relationship is latinized.
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ACACIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of AKAKIOS.
ACANTHA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ακανθα (Akantha), which meant "thorn, prickle". In Greek legend she was a nymph loved by Apollo.
ACHILLES   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Αχιλλευς (Achilleus) which is of unknown meaning, perhaps derived from Greek αχος (achos) "pain" or else from the name of the Achelous River. This was the name of a warrior in Greek legend, one of the central characters in Homer's 'Iliad'. The bravest of the Greek heroes in the war against the Trojans, he was eventually killed by an arrow to his heel, the only vulnerable part of his body.
ADOLPHUS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of ADOLF.
ADRASTEA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of ADRASTEIA. One of Jupiter's moons bears this name.
AEGLE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Αιγλη (Aigle) which meant "light, radiance, glory". This was the name of several characters in Greek myth, including one of the Heliades and one of the Hesperides.
AEOLUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of AIOLOS.
AGAPETUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Agapetos (see AGAPITO).
AGATHA   f   English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αγαθη (Agathe), derived from Greek αγαθος (agathos) meaning "good". Saint Agatha was a 3rd-century martyr from Sicily who was tortured and killed after spurning the advances of a Roman official. The saint was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). The mystery writer Agatha Christie (1890-1976) was a famous modern bearer of this name.
AGLAEA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of AGLAIA.
AGNES   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.
AJAX   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Αιας (Aias), perhaps deriving from Greek αιαστης (aiastes) "mourner" or αια (aia) "earth, land". In Greek mythology this was the name of two of the heroes who fought for the Greeks in the Trojan War, the son of Telamon and the son of Oileus. When the armour of the slain hero Achilles was not given to Ajax Telamonian, he became mad with jealousy and killed himself.
ALBERTUS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized), Dutch
Latinized form of Adalbert (see ALBERT).
ALCAEUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλκαιος (Alkaios), derived from αλκη (alke) "strength". This was the name of a 7th-century BC lyric poet from the island of Lesbos.
ALCIBIADES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλκιβιαδης (Alkibiades), derived from αλκη (alke) "strength" and βια (bia) "force" with the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This was the name of a notable Greek statesman and general during the Peloponnesian War. He changed allegiance from Athens to Sparta and back again during the course of the war.
ALCIDES   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Portuguese, Spanish
Latinized form of Greek Αλκειδης (Alkeides), derived from αλκη (alke) "strength" and the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This was another name for the hero Herakles.
ALCIPPE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Αλκιππη (Alkippe), derived from αλκη (alke) "strength" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". This was the name of a daughter of Ares in Greek myth. Her father killed Halirrhotis, a son of Poseidon, when he attempted to rape her, leading to a murder trial in which Ares was quickly acquitted.
ALCMENE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Αλκμηνη (Alkmene), derived from αλκη (alke) "strength" and μηνη (mene) "moon". In Greek mythology Alcmene was the wife of Amphitryon. She was the mother of Herakles by Zeus, who bedded her by disguising himself as her absent husband.
ALCYONE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Αλκυονη (Alkyone), derived from the word αλκυων (alkyon) meaning "kingfisher". In Greek myth this name belonged to a daughter of Aeolus and the wife of Ceyx. After her husband was killed in a shipwreck she threw herself into the water, but the gods saved her and turned them both into kingfishers. This is also the name of the brightest of the Pleiades, the seven stars in the constellation Taurus.
ALECTO   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Αληκτω (Alekto) which was derived from αληκτος (alektos) "unceasing". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ερινυες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology.
ALEXANDER   m   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.... [more]
ALEXIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξιος (Alexios), a derivative of Αλεξις (see ALEXIS). This was the name of five Byzantine emperors. It was also borne by a 5th-century Syrian saint who is especially venerated in the Eastern Church.
ALOYSIUS   m   English
Latinized form of Aloys, an old Occitan form of LOUIS. This was the name of a 16th-century Italian saint, Aloysius Gonzaga. The name has been in occasional use among Catholics since his time.
ALPHONSUS   m   History
Latinized form of ALFONSO. This name was borne by Saint Alphonsus Liguori, an 18th-century Italian bishop who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church.
ALWILDA   f   History
Latinized form of ALFHILD. This was the name of a legendary female Scandinavian pirate, also called Awilda.
AMPELIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Ampelios (see AMPELIO).
ANACLETUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ανακλητος (Anakletos), derived from ανακλητος (anakletos) meaning "invoked". This was the name of the third pope.
ANASTASIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αναστασιος (Anastasios) which meant "resurrection" from Greek αναστασις (anastasis) (composed of the elements ανα (ana) "up" and στασις (stasis) "standing"). This was the name of numerous early saints and martyrs, including a 7th-century monk and writer from Alexandria who is especially venerated in the Eastern Church.
ANATOLIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek Ανατολιος (Anatolios), derived from ανατολη (anatole) meaning "sunrise". Saint Anatolius was a 3rd-century philosopher from Alexandria.
ANDROCLES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Ανδροκλης (Androkles) which meant "glory of a man", derived from ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος) and κλεος (kleos) "glory". This was the name of a man who pulled a thorn from a lion's paw in one of Aesop's fables.
ANDRONICUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ανδρονικος (Andronikos) which meant "victory of a man", from ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος) and νικη (nike) meaning "victory". This name was used by Shakespeare in his play 'Titus Andronicus' (1593).
ANICETUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ανικητος (Aniketos), meaning "unconquerable". This was the name of an early pope.
ANTHEA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Ανθεια (Antheia), derived from ανθος (anthos) meaning "flower, blossom". This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Hera.
ANTIGONUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Αντιγονος (Antigonos), derived from αντι (anti) "against, compared to, like" and γονευς (goneus) "ancestor". This was the name of one of Alexander the Great's generals. After Alexander died, he took control of most of Asia Minor.
ANTIOCHUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Αντιοχος (Antiochos), derived from Greek αντι (anti) "against, compared to, like" and οχη (oche) "support". This was the name of several rulers of the Seleucid Empire.
ANTIPATER   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Αντιπατρος (Antipatros), which meant "like the father" from Greek αντι (anti) "against, compared to, like" and πατηρ (pater) "father" (genitive πατρος). This was the name of an officer of Alexander the Great who became the regent of Macedon during Alexander's absence.
ANUBIS   m   Egyptian Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Ανουβις (Anoubis), the Greek form of Egyptian Inpw (reconstructed as Anapa) which possibly meant "royal child". Anubis was the Egyptian god who led the dead to the underworld. He was often depicted as a man with the head of a jackal.
AOEDE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of AOIDE.
APOLLO   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Απολλων (Apollon), which is of unknown meaning, though perhaps related to Indo-European *apelo "strength". Another theory states that Apollo can be equated with Appaliunas, an Anatolian god whose name possibly means "father lion" or "father light". The Greeks later associated Apollo's name with the Greek verb απολλυμι (apollymi) meaning "to destroy". In Greek mythology Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto and the twin of Artemis. He was the god of prophecy, medicine, music, art, law, beauty, and wisdom. Later he also became the god of the sun and light.
ARCADIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of ARKADIOS.
ARCHELAUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized), Biblical Latin, Biblical
Latinized form of the Greek name Αρχελαος (Archelaos), which meant "master of the people" from αρχος (archos) "master" and λαος (laos) "people". This was the name of a son of Herod the Great. He ruled over Judea, Samaria and Idumea.
ARETHUSA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Αρεθουσα (Arethousa), which is possibly derived from αρδω (ardo) "water" and θοος (thoos) "quick, nimble". This was the name of a nymph in Greek mythology who was transformed into a fountain.
ARISTAEUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Αρισταιος (Aristaios), derived from αριστος (aristos) "best". This was the name of a minor Greek god of agriculture, hunting and cattle. He was the son of Apollo and the mortal Cyrene.
ARISTARCHUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Αρισταρχος (Aristarchos), derived from αριστος (aristos) "best" and αρχος (archos) "master". This name was borne by Aristarchus of Samos, a 3rd-century BC Greek astronomer and mathematician.
ARISTIDES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized), Spanish, Portuguese
From the Greek name Αριστειδης (Aristeides), derived from αριστος (aristos) "best" and the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This name was borne by the 5th-century BC Athenian statesman Aristides the Just, who was renowned for his integrity. It was also the name of a 2nd-century saint.
ARISTOCLES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Αριστοκλης (Aristokles) which meant "the best glory", derived from αριστος (aristos) "best" and κλεος (kleos) "glory". This was the real name of the philosopher Plato.
ARMINIUS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Germanic name which was probably derived from the element ermen meaning "whole, universal". Other theories claim that it is related to HERMAN. Arminius was a 1st-century ruler of the Cherusci who led a rebellion against the Roman Empire.
ARSENIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of ARSENIOS.
ARTEMIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of ARTEMIOS.
ASTRAEA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Αστραια (Astraia), derived from Greek αστηρ (aster) meaning "star". Astraea was a Greek goddess of justice and innocence. After wickedness took root in the world she left the earth and became the constellation Virgo.
ATHANASIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Αθανασιος (Athanasios) meaning "immortal", from Greek α (a), a negative prefix, combined with θανατος (thanatos) "death". Saint Athanasius was a 4th-century bishop of Alexandria who strongly opposed Arianism.
BASILIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of BASILEIOS.
BERENICE   f   English, Italian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Βερενικη (Berenike), the Macedonian form of the Greek name Φερενικη (Pherenike), which meant "bringing victory" from φερω (phero) "to bring" and νικη (nike) "victory". This name was common among the Ptolemy ruling family of Egypt, a dynasty which was originally from Macedon. It occurs briefly in Acts in the New Testament (in most English Bibles it is spelled Bernice) belonging to a sister of King Herod Agrippa II. As an English name, Berenice came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
BOADICEA   f   Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of BOUDICCA.
BRENDANUS   m   Irish (Latinized)
Latinized form of Bréanainn (see BRENDAN).
BRUNHILDA   f   History
Variant of BRÜNHILD, referring to the Frankish queen.
CADMUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Καδμος (Kadmos), of uncertain meaning. In Greek mythology Cadmus was the son of the Phoenician king Agenor. He was sent by his father to rescue his sister Europa, who had been abducted by Zeus, although he did not succeed in retrieving her. According to legend, Cadmus founded the city of Thebes and introduced the alphabet to Greece.
CALLIAS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of KALLIAS.
CALLISTO (2)   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of KALLISTO. A moon of Jupiter bears this name.
CALYPSO   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Καλυψω (Kalypso) which probably meant "she that conceals", derived from καλυπτω (kalypto) "to cover, to conceal". In Greek myth this was the name of the nymph who fell in love with Odysseus after he was shipwrecked on her island of Ogygia. When he refused to stay with her she detained him for seven years until Zeus ordered her to release him.
CARME (2)   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Καρμη (Karme), which was derived from κειρω (keiro) "to shear". This was the name of a Cretan goddess of the harvest.
CASSANDER   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κασσανδρος (Kassandros), the masculine form of CASSANDRA. This was the name of a 3rd-century BC king of Macedon.
CASSANDRA   f   English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, French, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κασσανδρα (Kassandra), derived from possibly κεκασμαι (kekasmai) "to excel, to shine" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek myth Cassandra was a Trojan princess, the daughter of Priam and Hecuba. She was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo, but when she spurned his advances he cursed her so nobody would believe her prophecies.... [more]
CASSIOPEIA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κασσιοπεια (Kassiopeia) or Κασσιεπεια (Kassiepeia), possibly meaning "cassia juice". In Greek myth Cassiopeia was the wife of Cepheus and the mother of Andromeda. She was changed into a constellation and placed in the northern sky after she died.
CASTOR   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Καστωρ (Kastor), possibly related to κεκασμαι (kekasmai) meaning "to excel, to shine" (pluperfect κεκαστο). In Greek myth Castor was a son of Zeus and the twin brother of Pollux. The constellation Gemini, which represents the two brothers, contains a star by this name.
CEPHALUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Κεφαλος (Kephalos), which was derived from κεφαλη (kephale) meaning "head". In Greek legend he remained faithful to his wife Procris even though he was pursued by the goddess Eos.
CEPHEUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Κηφευς (Kepheus), which is of unknown meaning. In Greek legend he was a king of Ethiopia, the husband of Cassiopeia. After he died he was made into a constellation and placed in the sky.
CERBERUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Κερβερος (Kerberos), which possibly meant "spotted". In Greek myth this was the name of the three-headed dog that guarded the entrance to Hades.
CIRCE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κιρκη (Kirke), which possibly meant "bird". In Greek mythology Circe was a sorceress who changed Odysseus's crew into hogs but was forced by him to change them back.
CLEISTHENES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Κλεισθενης (Kleisthenes), derived from κλεος (kleos) "glory" and σθενος (sthenos) "strength". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian statesman and reformer. He helped establish democracy in Athens.
CLEITUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of KLEITOS.
CLEON   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Κλεων (Kleon), a Greek name derived from κλεος (kleos) "glory".
CLEOPATRA   f   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κλεοπατρα (Kleopatra) which meant "glory of the father", derived from κλεος (kleos) "glory" combined with πατηρ (pater) "father" (genitive πατρος), This was the name of queens of Egypt from the Ptolemaic royal family, including Cleopatra VII, the mistress of both Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. After being defeated by Augustus she committed suicide by allowing herself to be bitten by an asp. Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606) is based on her.
CLIO   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Italian
Latinized form of KLEIO.
CLITUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of KLEITOS.
CLODOVICUS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Chlodovech (see LUDWIG).
CLOTHILDIS   f   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Old Germanic form of CLOTILDE.
CLOTHO   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of KLOTHO.
CLYTEMNESTRA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κλυταιμνηστρα (Klytaimnestra), from κλυτος (klytos) "famous, noble" and μνηστηρ (mnester) "courter, wooer". In Greek legend Clytemnestra was the wife of Agamemnon and the mother of Orestes and Electra. While her husband was away during the Trojan War she took a lover, and upon his return she had him murdered. She was subsequently killed by Orestes.
CLYTIA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of KLYTIË.
COEUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of KOIOS.
CORA   f   English, German, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of KORE. It was not used as a given name in the English-speaking world until after it was employed by James Fenimore Cooper for a character in his novel 'The Last of the Mohicans' (1826). In some cases it may be a short form of CORDULA, CORINNA or other names beginning with a similar sound.
CORINNA   f   English, German, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Κοριννα (Korinna), which was derived from κορη (kore) "maiden". This was the name of a Greek lyric poet of the 5th century BC. The Roman poet Ovid used it for the main female character in his book 'Amores'. In the modern era it has been in use since the 17th century, when Robert Herrick used it in his poem 'Corinna's going a-Maying'.
COSMAS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Κοσμας (Kosmas), which was derived from κοσμος (kosmos) meaning "order, decency". Saint Cosmas was martyred with his twin brother Damian in the 4th century. They are the patron saints of physicians.
CRIUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of KREIOS.
CRONUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Κρονος (Kronos), possibly derived from the Indo-European root *ker- meaning "to cut". Cronus was the Titan who fathered the Greek gods. As his wife Rhea gave birth to the gods, Cronus swallowed them fearing the prophecy that he would be overthrown by one of his children. However Rhea hid Zeus, her last child, who eventually forced his father to disgorge his siblings. Cronus and the rest of the Titans were then defeated by the gods and exiled.
CYNTHIA   f   English, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κυνθια (Kynthia) which means "woman from Kynthos". This was an epithet of the Greek moon goddess Artemis, given because Kynthos was the mountain on Delos on which she and her twin brother Apollo were born. It was not used as a given name until the Renaissance, and it did not become common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century.
CYRILLUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of KYRILLOS.
CYRUS   m   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From Κυρος (Kyros), the Greek form of the Persian name Kūrush, which may mean "far sighted" or "young". The name is sometimes associated with Greek κυριος (kyrios) "lord". It was borne by several kings of Persia, including Cyrus the Great, who conquered Babylon. He is famous in the Old Testament for freeing the captive Jews and allowing them to return to Israel. As an English name, it first came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
DAEDALUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Δαιδαλος (Daidalos) which was derived from δαιδαλλω (daidallo) meaning "to work cunningly". In Greek myth Daedalus was an Athenian inventor who was banished to Crete. There he designed the Labyrinth for King Minos, but he and his son Icarus were eventually imprisoned inside it because he had aided Theseus in his quest against the Minotaur. Daelalus and Icarus escaped using wings fashioned from wax, but Icarus fell from the sky to his death.
DAMIANUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of DAMIANOS.
DAMOCLES   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Δαμοκλης (Damokles), which was derived from δαμος (damos) "the people", a Doric Greek variant of δημος (demos), and κλεος (kleos) "glory". In Greek legend Damocles was a member of the court of Dionysius the Elder, the king of Syracuse. Damocles expressed envy of the king's station so Dionysius offered to switch roles with him for a day. To illustrate to Damocles the peril of a man in his position he suspended a sword over the throne.
DARIA   f   Italian, Polish, Romanian, English, Croatian, Late Greek (Latinized)
Feminine form of DARIUS. Saint Daria was a 3rd-century Greek woman who was martyred with her husband Chrysanthus under the Roman emperor Numerian. It has never been a particularly common English given name.
DEMETRIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Δημητριος (Demetrios), which was derived from the name of the Greek goddess DEMETER (1). Kings of Macedon and the Seleucid kingdom have had this name. This was also the name of several early saints including a Saint Demetrius who was martyred in the 4th century.
DEMOCRITUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Δημοκριτος (Demokritos), a Greek name meaning "judge of the people" from the elements δημος (demos) "the people" and κριτης (krites) "judge, critic". This was the name of a Greek philosopher, the creator of the atomic theory.
DIDACUS   m   Medieval Spanish
Form of DIEGO found in medieval Latin records.
DIOCLES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of DIOKLES.
DIODORUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Διοδωρος (Diodoros) which meant "gift of Zeus", derived from the elements Διος (Dios) meaning "of ZEUS" and δωρον (doron) meaning "gift". This was the name of a 1st-century BC Greek historian.
DIODOTUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Διοδοτος (Diodotos), a Greek name which meant "given by Zeus" from Διος (Dios) meaning "of ZEUS" and δοτος (dotos) meaning "given".
DIONYSIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized), Biblical
Latin form of DIONYSIOS. Dionysius the Areopagite, who is mentioned in the New Testament, was a judge converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. This was also the name of many other early saints, including a 3rd-century pope.
DRACO   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Δρακων (Drakon) which meant "dragon, serpent". This was the name of a 7th-century BC Athenian legislator. This is also the name of a constellation in the northern sky.
EDANA   f   History
Latinized form of ÉTAÍN. This was the name of an early Irish saint.
ELECTRA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ηλεκτρα (Elektra), derived from ηλεκτρον (elektron) meaning "amber". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra and the sister of Orestes. She helped her brother kill their mother and her lover Aegisthus in vengeance for Agamemnon's murder. Also in Greek mythology, this name was borne by one of the Pleiades, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione.
ELEUTHERIUS   m   Late Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ελευθεριος (Eleutherios) which meant "free". This was the name of a 2nd-century pope, as well as several saints.
ELPIDIUS   m   Late Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ελπιδιος (Elpidios), which was derived from ελπις (elpis) "hope". This was the name of a 4th-century saint who spent twenty years in a cave in Cappadocia.
EPIPHANIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Epiphanios (see EPIFANIO).
ERASMUS   m   Late Greek (Latinized)
Derived from Greek ερασμιος (erasmios) meaning "beloved". Saint Erasmus, also known as Saint Elmo, was a 4th-century martyr who is the patron saint of sailors. Erasmus was also the name of a Dutch scholar of the Renaissance period.
EREBUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Ερεβος (Erebos) which means "nether darkness". Erebus was the personification of the primordial darkness in Greek mythology.
EUDOCIA   f   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευδοκια (Eudokia), derived from the word ευδοκεω (eudokeo) meaning "to be well pleased, to be satisfied", itself derived from ευ (eu) "good" and δοκεω (dokeo) "to think, to imagine, to suppose".
EUGENIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Polish, English, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Feminine form of Eugenius (see EUGENE). It was borne by a semi-legendary 3rd-century saint who escaped persecution by disguising herself as a man. The name was occasionally found in England during the Middle Ages, but it was not regularly used until the 19th century.
EUGENIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eugenios (see EUGENE).
EUROPA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ευρωπη (Europe), which meant "wide face" from ευρυς (eurys) "wide" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Greek mythology Europa was a Phoenician princess who was abducted and taken to Crete by Zeus in the guise of a bull. She became the first queen of Crete, and later fathered Minos by Zeus. The continent of Europe is named for her. This is also the name of a moon of Jupiter.
EURYDICE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Ευρυδικη (Eurydike) which meant "wide justice", derived from ευρυς (eurys) "wide" and δικη (dike) "justice". In Greek myth she was the wife of Orpheus. Her husband tried to rescue her from Hades, but he failed when he disobeyed the condition that he not look back upon her on their way out.
EUSEBIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of EUSEBIOS. This was the name of a 4th-century historian of the Christian church.
EUSTATHIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ευσταθιος (Eustathios), derived from the Greek word ευσταθης (eustathes) meaning "well-built, stable". It is ultimately from ευ (eu) "good" and ‘ιστημι (histemi) "to stand, to set up". This was the name of a few early saints, including the 2nd-century martyr also known as Eustachius (see Eustace).
EUSTORGIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eustorgios (see EUSTORGIO).
EUTHYMIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευθυμιος (Euthymios) which meant "in good spirits", derived from the word ευθυμος (euthymos), which was composed of the elements ευ (eu) "good" and θυμος (thymos) "soul, spirit". This was the name of several early saints.
EUTROPIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευτροπιος (Eutropios), which was derived from the word ευτροπος (eutropos) "versatile", formed of the elements ευ (eu) "good" and τροπος (tropos) "direction, manner, fashion".
EUTYCHIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευτυχιος (Eutychios), a variant of Eutychos (see EUTYCHUS). This was the name of several early saints and martyrs.
EVADNE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ευαδνη (Euadne), which is of unknown meaning, though the first element is derived from Greek ευ (eu) "good". In Greek legend Evadne was the wife of Capaneus. After Capaneus was killed by a lightning bolt sent from Zeus she committed suicide by throwing herself onto his burning body.
EVANDER (1)   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Variant of Evandrus, the Latin form of the Greek name Ευανδρος (Euandros), derived from Greek ευ (eu) meaning "good" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Roman mythology Evander was an Arcadian hero of the Trojan War who founded the city of Pallantium near the spot where Rome was later built.
EVARISTUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ευαριστος (Euaristos) meaning "well pleasing" from the Greek word ευαρεστος (euarestos), derived from ευ (eu) "good, well" and αρεστος (arestos) "pleasing". This was the name of the fifth pope, supposedly martyred under emperor Hadrian.
FEDELMA   f   Irish
Latinized form of FEIDELM.
FIDELMA   f   Irish
Latinized form of FEIDELM. Saint Fidelma and her sister Saint Eithne were 5th-century followers of Saint Patrick.
GAEA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of GAIA.
GAIANA   f   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Γαιανη (Gaiane), a derivative of GAIA. This was the name of a (perhaps fictional) martyr who was killed in Armenia during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian in the late 3rd century.
GENNADIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Γενναδιος (Gennadios), which was derived from Greek γενναδας (gennadas) "noble, generous". Saint Gennadius was an early martyr from North Africa.
GEORGIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of GEORGIOS.
GERVASIUS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Probably a Latinized form of a Germanic name with a first element deriving from ger "spear". Saint Gervasius was an early martyr from Milan whose remains were discovered in the 4th century.
GISLENUS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Gislin (see GHISLAIN).
GLAUCUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Γλαυκος (Glaukos), a name meaning "bluish grey". This was the name of a Greek sea god, as well as other characters in Greek legend.
GOBNATA   f   History
Latinate form of GOBNAIT.
GODIVA   f   Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Old English name Godgifu meaning "gift of god", from the elements god and giefu "gift". Lady Godiva was an 11th-century English noblewoman who, according to legend, rode naked through the streets of Coventry to protest the high taxes imposed by her husband upon the townspeople.
GRANIA   f   Irish
Latinized form of GRÁINNE.
GREGORIUS   m   Late Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of GREGORIOS.
HADES   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek ‘Αιδης (Haides), derived from αιδης (aides) meaning "unseen". In Greek mythology Hades was the dark god of the underworld, which was also called Hades. His brother was Zeus and his wife was Persephone.
HALCYONE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek ‘Αλκυονη (Halkyone), a variant of Αλκυονη (see ALCYONE).
HECATE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek ‘Εκατη (Hekate), possibly derived from ‘εκας (hekas) meaning "far off". In Greek mythology Hecate was a goddess associated with witchcraft, crossroads, tombs, demons and the underworld.
HECTOR   m   English, French, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Arthurian Romance
Latinized form of Greek ‘Εκτωρ (Hektor), which was derived from ‘εκτωρ (hektor) "holding fast", ultimately from εχω (echo) meaning "to hold, to possess". In Greek legend Hector was one of the Trojan champions who fought against the Greeks. After he killed Achilles' friend Patroclus in battle, he was himself brutally slain by Achilles, who proceeded to tie his dead body to a chariot and drag it about. This name also appears in Arthurian legends belonging to King Arthur's foster father.... [more]
HECUBA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek ‘Εκαβη (Hekabe), which is of uncertain meaning. In Greek mythology this is the name of the wife of Priam of Troy.
HELLADIUS   m   Late Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Late Greek name ‘Ελλαδιος (Helladios), which was derived from ‘Ελλαδος (Hellados) meaning "of Greece". Saint Helladius was a 7th-century archbishop of Toledo.
HEPHAESTUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek ‘Ηφαιστος (Hephaistos), meaning unknown. It probably shares its origin with the Minoan city of Φαιστος (Phaistos), which is of Pre-Greek origin. In Greek mythology Hephaestus was the god of fire and forging, the husband of the unfaithful Aphrodite. It was said that when he was born Hera, his mother, was so displeased with his physical deformities that she hurled him off the top of Mount Olympus.
HERACLEITUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Ηρακλειτος (Herakleitos) which meant "glory of Hera", derived from the name of the goddess HERA combined with κλειτος (kleitos) "glory". This was the name of a 6th-century BC Greek philosopher from Ephesus.
HERACLES   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of HERAKLES. However, the spelling used by the Romans was Hercules.
HERACLIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek personal name ‘Ηρακλειος (Herakleios) which was derived from the name of the Greek hero HERAKLES. This was the name of a 7th-century Byzantine emperor, known for his victories over the Sassanid Persian Empire. This name was also borne by two early saints.
HERO (2)   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of HERON.
HERODOTUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Ηροδοτος (Herodotos), derived from the name of the goddess HERA combined with δοτος (dotos) meaning "given, granted". Herodotus was a Greek historian of the 5th century BC who wrote about Persian and the Persian Wars. He is known as the Father of History.
HIERONYMUS   m   German, Dutch (Archaic), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latin form of JEROME used in Germany and the Netherlands. Hieronymus Bosch was a 15th-century Dutch painter known for his depictions of the torments of hell.
HILDA   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of names containing the Germanic element hild "battle". The short form was used for both Old English and continental Germanic names. Saint Hilda of Whitby was a 7th-century English saint and abbess. The name became rare in England during the later Middle Ages, but was revived in the 19th century.
HIPPOCRATES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Ιπποκρατης (Hippokrates) which meant "horse power", derived from the elements ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse" and κρατος (kratos) "power". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek doctor who is known as the Father of Medicine.
HIPPOLYTA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of HIPPOLYTE (1). Shakespeare used this name in his comedy 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1595).
HORUS   m   Egyptian Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of ‘Ωρος (Horos), the Greek form of Egyptian Hrw (reconstructed as Heru) possibly meaning "falcon" or "high". In Egyptian mythology Horus was the god of light, often depicted as a man with the head of a falcon. The son Osiris and Isis, he avenged his father's murder by killing Seth.
HUGO   m   Spanish, Portuguese, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
HYACINTHUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Υακινθος (Hyakinthos), which was derived from the name of the hyacinth flower. In Greek legend Hyakinthos was accidentally killed by Apollo, who caused a lily to arise from his blood. The name was also borne by several early saints, notably a 3rd-century martyr who was killed with his brother Protus.
HYGINUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of ‘Υγινος (Hyginos), a Greek name derived from ‘υγιεινος (hygieinos) meaning "healthy". This was the name of the ninth pope.
IAPETUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of IAPETOS. This is the name of one of Saturn's moons.
ICARUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Ικαρος (Ikaros), of unknown meaning. In Greek myth Icarus was the son of Daedalus, locked with his father inside the Labyrinth by Minos. They escaped from the maze using wings devised from wax, but Icarus flew too close to the sun and the wax melted, plunging him to his death.
IGERNA   f   Arthurian Romance
Latin form of IGRAINE.
ILITHYIA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Ειλειθυια (Eileithyia), which was derived from ειληλυθυια (eilelythyia) "the readycomer". This was the name of the Greek goddess of childbirth and midwifery.
IODOCUS   m   Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Judoc (see JOYCE).
IRENAEUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ειρηναιος (Eirenaios) which meant "peaceful". Saint Irenaeus was an early bishop of Lyons for whom the Greek island of Santorini is named.
IRENE   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ειρηνη (Eirene), derived from a word meaning "peace". This was the name of the Greek goddess who personified peace, one of the ‘Ωραι (Horai). It was also borne by several early Christian saints. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, notably being borne by an 8th-century empress, who was the first woman to lead the empire. She originally served as regent for her son, but later had him killed and ruled alone.... [more]
ISOCRATES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ισοκρατης (Isokrates) which meant "equal power", derived from ισος (isos) "equal" and κρατος (kratos) "power". This was the name of a 4th-century BC Athenian orator.
ISOLDA   f   Arthurian Romance
Latinate form of ISOLDE.
IUDOCUS   m   Ancient Celtic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Judoc (see JOYCE).
JOCASTA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ιοκαστη (Iokaste), which is of unknown meaning. In Greek mythology she was the mother Oedipus by the Theban king Laius. In a case of tragic mistaken identity, she married her own son.
LADISLAS   m   History
Latinized form of VLADISLAV.
LADISLAUS   m   History
Latinized form of VLADISLAV.
LAIUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Λαιος (Laios), which is of unknown meaning. This was the name of a king of Thebes in Greek mythology, the husband of Jocasta. Due to a prophecy that he would be killed by his son, Laius left his infant Oedipus for dead. The boy survived but was ignorant of his true parentage. Years later he unwittingly killed Laius in a quarrel on the road.
LARISSA   f   English, Portuguese (Brazilian), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Variant of LARISA. It has been commonly used as an English given name only since the 20th century. In 1991 this name was given to one of the moons of Neptune, in honour of the mythological character.
LEANDER   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λεανδρος (Leandros), derived from λεων (leon) meaning "lion" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek legend Leander was the lover of Hero. Every night he swam across the Hellespont to meet her, but on one occasion he was drowned when a storm arose. When Hero saw his dead body she threw herself into the waters and perished.
LEONTIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of LEONTIOS.
LINUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized), German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Greek name Λινος (Linos) meaning "flax". In Greek legend he was the son of the god Apollo, who accidentally killed him in a contest. Another son of Apollo by this name was the music teacher of Herakles. The name was also borne by the second pope, serving after Saint Peter in the 1st century. In modern times this was the name of a character in Charles Schulz's comic strip 'Peanuts'.
LUDOVICUS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Chlodovech (see LUDWIG).
LUTGARDIS   f   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Germanic name LUITGARD.
LYCURGUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λυκουργος (Lykourgos), derived from λυκος (lykos) "wolf" (genitive λυκου) and εργον (ergon) "work, deed". In Greek legend this was the name of a king who was driven mad by the gods because of his impiety. This was also the name of a Spartan legislator of the 9th century BC.
LYCUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λυκος (Lykos) meaning "wolf". This name was borne by several characters in Greek mythology including a legendary ruler of Thebes.
LYSANDER   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λυσανδρος (Lysandros), derived from Greek λυσις (lysis) meaning "a release" and ανηρ (aner) meaning "man" (genitive ανδρος). This was the name of a notable 5th-century BC Spartan general and naval commander.
LYSIMACHUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Λυσιμαχος (Lysimachos), derived from λυσις (lysis) "a release, loosening" and μαχη (mache) "battle". This was the name of one of the generals under Alexander the Great. After Alexander's death Lysimachus took control of Thrace.
MANUEL   m   Spanish, Portuguese, German, English, Italian, French, Romanian, Late Greek (Latinized)
Spanish and Portuguese form of EMMANUEL. In the spelling Μανουηλ (Manouel) it was also used in the Byzantine Empire, notably by two emperors. It is possible this form of the name was transmitted to Spain and Portugal from Byzantium, since there were connections between the royal families (king Ferdinand III of Castile married Elisabeth of Hohenstaufen, who had Byzantine roots, and had a son named Manuel). The name has been used in Iberia since at least the 13th century and was borne by two kings of Portugal.
MEDEA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Georgian
From Greek Μηδεια (Medeia), possibly derived from μηδομαι (medomai) "to think, to plan". In Greek mythology Medea was a sorceress from Colchis (modern Georgia) who helped Jason gain the Golden Fleece. They were married, but eventually Jason left her for another woman. For revenge Medea slew Jason's new lover and also had her own children by Jason killed.
MEDUSA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Μεδουσα (Medousa), which was derived from μεδω (medo) meaning "to protect, to rule over". In Greek myth this was the name of one of the three Gorgons, ugly women who had snakes for hair. She was so hideous that anyone who gazed upon her was turned to stone, so the hero Perseus had to look using the reflection in his shield in order to slay her.
MEGAERA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Μεγαιρα (Megaira) which was derived from μεγαιρω (megairo) "to grudge". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ερινυες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology. The name is used as a word in several European languages to denote a shrewish, ill-tempered woman (for example, French mégère and Italian megera).
MENELAUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Μενελαος (Menelaos) which meant "withstanding the people", derived from μενω (meno) "to last, to withstand" and λαος (laos) "the people". In Greek legend he was a king of Sparta and the husband of Helen. When his wife was taken by Paris, the Greeks besieged the city of Troy in an effort to get her back. After the war Menelaus and Helen settled down to a happy life.
METHODIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Μεθοδιος (Methodios), derived from Greek μεθοδος (methodos) meaning "pursuit" or "method", ultimately from μετα (meta) "with" and ‘οδος (hodos) "road". Saint Methodius was a Greek missionary to the Slavs who developed the Cyrillic alphabet (with his brother Cyril) in order to translate the Bible into Slavic.
NARCISSUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Late Roman, Biblical
Latinized form of Greek Ναρκισσος (Narkissos), possibly derived from ναρκη (narke) meaning "sleep, numbness". Narkissos was a beautiful youth in Greek mythology who stared at his own reflection for so long that he eventually died and was turned into the narcissus flower.... [more]
NAUSICAA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Ναυσικαα (Nausikaa) meaning "burner of ships". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of a daughter of Alcinous who helps Odysseus on his journey home.
NEOPTOLEMUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Νεοπτολεμος (Neoptolemos) meaning "new war", derived from νεος (neos) "new" and πολεμος (polemos) "war". In Greek legend this was the name of the son of Achilles, brought into the Trojan War because it was prophesied the Greeks could not win it unless he was present. After the war he was slain by Orestes fighting over Hermione.
NICANOR   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Νικανωρ (Nikanor), which was derived from νικη (nike) "victory". This name was borne by several notable officers from ancient Macedon.
NICOLAUS   m   German, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Nikolaos (see NICHOLAS). This form is also used in Germany as a variant of NIKOLAUS.
NIGELLUS   m   English (Archaic)
Latin form of NIGEL.
OCEANUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of OKEANOS.
OEDIPUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Οιδιπους (Oidipous), meaning "swollen foot" from οιδεω (oideo) "to swell" and πους (pous) "foot". In Greek mythology Oedipus was the son of the Theban king Laius and his wife Jocasta. Laius received a prophesy that he would be killed by his son, so he left the newborn to die of exposure. Oedipus was however rescued and raised in the home of the Corinthian king Polybus. After he had grown and learned of the same prophesy, Oedipus left Corinth so that he would not be a danger to Polybus, who he assumed was his father. On the road to Delphi he chanced upon his real father Laius and slew him in a petty disagreement, thus fulfilling the prophecy. He then correctly answered the Sphinx's riddle, winning the now vacant throne of Thebes and marrying the widowed queen Jocasta, his own mother. Years later they learned the truth of their relationship, prompting Jocasta to commit suicide and Oedipus to blind himself.
OENONE   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Οινωνε (Oinone), derived from οινος (oinos) meaning "wine". In Greek mythology Oenone was a mountain nymph who was married to Paris before he went after Helen.
ONUPHRIUS   m   Egyptian Mythology (Latinized), Late Roman
Latinized form of Greek Οννωφρις (Onnophris), derived from Egyptian Unn-nfr meaning "he who is good, he who is happy". This was an epithet of the god Osiris. It was later used by an Egyptian saint and hermit from the 4th or 5th century.
PANCRATIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Πανκρατιος (Pankratios), derived from παν (pan) "all" and κρατος (kratos) "power". Early Byzantine Christians used this as a title of Christ. It was borne by two saints, a 1st-century Sicilian martyr and a semi-legendary 4th-century Roman martyr.
PATROCLUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Πατροκλος (Patroklos) which meant "glory of the father", derived from πατηρ (pater) "father" (genitive πατρος) and κλεος (kleos) "glory". In Greek legend he was one of the heroes who fought against the Trojans. His death at the hands of Hector drew his friend Achilles back into the war.
PELAGIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Πελαγιος (Pelagios), which was derived from πελαγος (pelagos) "the sea". This was the name of several saints and two popes.
PERICLES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Περικλης (Perikles), which was derived from the Greek elements περι (peri) "around, exceedingly" and κλεος (kleos) "glory". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian statesman and general.
PHAEDRA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Φαιδρα (Phaidra), derived from φαιδρος (phaidros) meaning "bright". Phaedra was the daughter of Minos and the wife of Theseus in Greek mythology. Aphrodite caused her to fall in love with her stepson Hippolytos, and after she was rejected by him she killed herself.
PHAEDRUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φαιδρος (Phaidros), which meant "bright". This was the name of a 5th-century BC Greek philosopher, and also of a 1st-century Roman fabulist who was originally a slave from Thrace.
PHILANDER   m   English (Archaic), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Φιλανδρος (Philandros) meaning "friend of man" from Greek φιλος (philos) "friend" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). It was the name of a son of Apollo with the nymph Acalle. In the 18th century this was coined as a word meaning "to womanize", and the name subsequently dropped out of use.
PHILO   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Φιλων (Philon), which was derived from φιλος (philos) meaning "lover, friend". This was the name of a 1st-century Hellenistic Jewish philosopher and theologian from Alexandria.
PHOCAS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φωκας (Phokas), which meant "a seal" from Greek φωκη (phoke). This was the name of an early saint and martyr from Asia Minor. Sentenced to death for being a Christian, he is said to have given his killers lodging and then dug his own grave before he was executed.
PHOEBE   f   English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).
PHOEBUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβος (Phoibos), which meant "bright, pure". This was an epithet of the Greek god Apollo.
PHOTINA   f   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of PHOTINE.
PHRIXUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Φριξος (Phrixos) which meant "thrilling, causing shivers", derived from φριξ (phrix) "ripple, shiver". In Greek myth Phrixus was the son of Athamus and Nephele. He was to be sacrificed to Zeus, but he escaped with his sister Helle on the back of the ram with the Golden Fleece.
PLATO   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Πλατων (Platon) which was derived from Greek πλατυς (platys) meaning "broad-shouldered". Plato was one of the most important of the Greek philosophers. He was a pupil of Socrates and a teacher of Aristotle. He constructed the theory of Forms and wrote several works, including the 'Republic'.
PLUTO   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Latinized form of Greek Πλουτων (Plouton), derived from πλουτος (ploutos) meaning "wealth". This was an alternate name of Hades, the god of the underworld. This is also the name of a dwarf planet (formerly designated the ninth planet) in the solar system.
POLYXENA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Πολυξενη (Polyxene) which was from the word πολυξενος (polyxenos) meaning "entertaining many guests, very hospitable", itself derived from πολυς (polys) "many" and ξενος (xenos) "foreigner, guest". In Greek legend she was a daughter of Priam and Hecuba, beloved by Achilles. After the Trojan War, Achilles' son Neoptolemus sacrificed her.
PRIAPUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Meaning unknown. This was the name of a Greek god of fertility, gardens, and the phallus.
PYRRHUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Πυρρος (Pyrros) which meant "flame-coloured, red", related to πυρ (pyr) "fire". This was another name of Neoptolemus the son of Achilles. This was also the name of a 3rd-century BC king of Epirus.
RAMIRUS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Raginmar (see RAMIRO).
RHEA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Latinized form of Greek ‘Ρεια (Rheia), meaning unknown, perhaps related to ‘ρεω (rheo) "to flow" or ερα (era) "ground". In Greek mythology Rhea was a Titan, the wife of Cronus, and the mother of Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hera, Demeter and Hestia. Also, in Roman mythology a woman named Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
ROCHUS   m   German (Rare), Dutch (Rare), Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of ROCCO, used in occasionally German and Dutch.
ROHESIA   f   Medieval English (Latinized)
Latinized form of the medieval name Rohese (see ROSE).
ROLLO   m   English
Latinized form of Roul, the Old French form of ROLF. Rollo (or Rolf) the Ganger was an exiled Viking who, in the 10th century, became the first Duke of Normandy. It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century.
ROSA (1)   f   Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).
ROXANA   f   English, Spanish, Romanian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latin form of Ρωξανη (Roxane), the Greek form of the Persian or Bactrian name روشنک (Roshanak) which meant "bright" or "dawn". This was the name of Alexander the Great's first wife, a daughter of the Bactrian nobleman Oxyartes. In the modern era it came into use during the 17th century. In the English-speaking world it was popularized by Daniel Defoe, who used it in his novel 'Roxana' (1724).
SABIA   f   Irish Mythology
Latinized form of SADB.
SELENA   f   Spanish, Russian, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of SELENE. This name was borne by popular Mexican-American singer Selena Quintanilla (1971-1995), who was known simply as Selena.
SELEUCUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Σελευκος (Seleukos), of unknown meaning. This was the name of one of Alexander the Great's generals, who established the Seleucid Empire in Western Asia after Alexander's death.
SOCRATES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Σωκρατης (Sokrates), which was derived from σως (sos) "whole, unwounded, safe" and κρατος (kratos) "power". This was the name of an important Greek philosopher. He left no writings of his own; virtually everything that we know of his beliefs comes from his pupil Plato. He was sentenced to death for impiety.
SOPHOCLES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Σοφοκλης (Sophokles), which was derived from Greek σοφος (sophos) "skilled, clever" and κλεος (kleos) "glory". Sophocles was a 5th-century BC Greek tragic poet.
SOPHRONIUS   m   Late Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Σωφρονιος (Sophronios), which was derived from Greek σωφρων (sophron) "self-controlled, sensible". Saint Sophronius was a 7th-century patriarch of Jerusalem.
SOPHUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Σοφος (Sophos) which meant "skilled, clever".
STANISLAS   m   History
Latinized form of STANISLAV.
TELESPHORUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Telesphoros (see TÉLESPHORE).
THALIA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Greek
From the Greek name Θαλεια (Thaleia), derived from θαλλω (thallo) meaning "to blossom". In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, presiding over comedy and pastoral poetry. This was also the name of one of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites).
THEMISTOCLES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεμιστοκλης (Themistokles) meaning "glory of the law", from θεμις (themis) "law of nature, divine law" (genitive θεμιστος) and κλεος (kleos) "glory". This was the name of an Athenian statesman and general who was victorious over the Persians in the Battle of Salamis.
THEOCRITUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Θεοκριτος (Theokritos), a Greek name which meant "judge of god" from θεος (theos) "god" and κριτης (krites) "judge, critic". This was the name of a 3rd-century BC Greek poet.
THEODORUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized), Dutch
Latinized form of the Greek name Theodoros (see THEODORE).
THEODOSIUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεοδοσιος (Theodosios) which meant "giving to god", derived from θεος (theos) "god" and δοσις (dosis) "giving". Saint Theodosius of Palestine was a monk who founded a monastery near Bethlehem in the 5th century. This also was the name of emperors of the Eastern Roman and Byzantine Empires.
THEODOTUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεοδοτος (Theodotos) which meant "given to god" from θεος (theos) "god" and δοτος (dotos) "given". This name belonged to several early saints and martyrs.
THEODULUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεοδουλος (Theodoulos) which meant "slave of god", derived from θεος (theos) "god" and δουλος (doulos) "slave". This name was borne by several early saints.
THEOPHILUS   m   Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεοφιλος (Theophilos) which meant "friend of god", derived from θεος (theos) "god" and φιλος (philos) "friend". In the New Testament the evangelist Luke addresses his gospel and the Book of Acts to a man named Theophilus.
THEOTIMUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Θεοτιμος (Theotimos), derived from the elemenets θεος (theos) "god" and τιμαω (timao) "to honour". Saint Theotimus was a 4th-century bishop of Tomi in Scythia.
THUCYDIDES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Θουκυδιδης (Thoukydides), derived from θεος (theos) "god" (genitive θεου) and κυδος (kydos) "glory" with the patronymic suffix ιδης (ides). This was the name of a 5th-century BC Athenian historian.
TIMAEUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized), Biblical Latin, Biblical
Latinized form of the Greek name Τιμαιος (Timaios), derived from τιμαω (timao) "to honour". This is the name of one of Plato's dialogues, featuring Timaeus and Socrates. Timaeus is also the name of a person mentioned briefly in the New Testament (Mark 10:46).
TYCHO   m   Danish, Dutch
Latinized form of TYGE. This name was borne by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe (1546-1601).
URANIA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of OURANIA.
URANUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ουρανος (Ouranos), the name of the husband of Gaia and the father of the Titans in Greek mythology. His name is derived from ουρανος (ouranos) meaning "the heavens". This is also the name of the seventh planet in the solar system.
VEDASTUS   m   History
Possibly a Latinized form of a Germanic or Celtic name, possibly Germanic WIDOGAST. This was the name of a 6th-century saint who helped to convert the Frankish king Clovis to Christianity.
VENCESLAUS   m   Medieval Czech (Latinized)
Latinized form of Veceslav (see VÁCLAV).
VEREMUND   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Germanic name, probably Waramunt, derived from war "vigilant, cautious" and mund "protection". This was the name of a 5th-century king of Galicia (from the Germanic tribe of the Suebi). It was later the name of kings of Asturias and León, though their names are usually spelled in the Spanish form Bermudo.
WENCESLAS   m   History
Latinized form of Veceslav (see VÁCLAV).
WENCESLAUS   m   History
Latinized form of Veceslav (see VÁCLAV).
XENOCRATES   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Ξενοκρατης (Xenokrates), which was derived from ξενος (xenos) "foreigner, guest" and κρατος (kratos) "power". This was the name of a 4th-century BC Greek philosopher.
ZENO   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized), Italian
From the Greek name Ζηνων (Zenon), which was derived from the name of the Greek god ZEUS. Zeno was the name of two famous Greek philosophers: Zeno of Elea and Zeno of Citium, the founder of the Stoic school in Athens.
ZEPHYRUS   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Zephyros (see ZEPHYR).
ZOSIMUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of Ζωσιμος (Zosimos), a Greek name derived from ζωσιμος (zosimos) meaning "viable" or "likely to survive". This was the name of several early saints and a pope.
ZOTICUS   m   Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ζωτικος (Zotikos), derived from ζωτικος (zotikos) meaning "full of life". This was the name of several early saints.
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