Names with Relationship "newer form"

This is a list of names in which the relationship is newer form.
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REINHOLD   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of REYNOLD.
REUBEN   m   Biblical, Hebrew, English
Means "behold, a son" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the eldest son of Jacob and Leah and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Reuben was cursed by his father because he slept with Jacob's concubine Bilhah. It has been used as a Christian name in Britain since the Protestant Reformation.
REUVEN   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of REUBEN.
RHIANNON   f   Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.... [more]
RHODA   f   Biblical, English
Derived from Greek ‘ροδον (rhodon) meaning "rose". In the New Testament this name was borne by a maid in the house of Mary the mother of John Mark. As an English given name, Rhoda came into use in the 17th century.
RICHARD   m   English, French, German, Czech, Slovak, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, one of the leaders of the Third Crusade in the 12th century.... [more]
RIVKA   f   Hebrew
Hebrew form of REBECCA.
ROLAND   m   English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Medieval French
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and land meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
ROSE   f   English, French
Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
ROSHANAK   f   Persian, Ancient Persian
Original Persian form of ROXANA.
ROSTAM   m   Persian, Persian Mythology
Meaning unknown. Rostam was a warrior hero in Persian legend. The 11th-century Persian poet Firdausi recorded his tale in the 'Shahnameh'.
ROYSE   f   Medieval English
Medieval variant of ROSE.
RUTH (1)   f   English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Hebrew name which was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament. She was a Moabite woman who accompanied her mother-in-law Naomi back to Bethlehem after Ruth's husband died. There she met and married Boaz. She was an ancestor of King David.... [more]
SADB   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "sweet, goodly" in Irish Gaelic. In Irish mythology Sadb was the mother of Oisín.
SADHBH   f   Irish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of SADB.
SALOME   f   English, German, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From an Aramaic name which was related to the Hebrew word שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". According to the historian Josephus this was the name of the daughter of Herodias (the consort of Herod Antipas, the tetrarch of Galilee). In the New Testament, though a specific name is not given, it was a daughter of Herodias who danced for Herod and was rewarded with the head of John the Baptist, and thus Salome and the dancer have traditionally been equated.... [more]
SAM (2)   m   Persian, Persian Mythology
Means "dark" in Avestan. This is the name of a hero in the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh'.
SAMPO   m   Finnish, Finnish Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Finnish mythology this is the name of a magical artifact (perhaps a mill) created by the smith god Ilmarinen.
SARAH   f   English, French, German, Hebrew, Arabic, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lady, princess, noblewoman" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of Abraham's wife, considered the matriarch of the Jewish people. She was barren until she unexpectedly became the pregnant with Isaac at the age of 90. Her name was originally Sarai, but God changed it at the same time Abraham's name was changed (see Genesis 17:15).... [more]
SAROSH   m   Persian Mythology
Middle Persian form of SOROUSH.
SAULE   f   Latvian, Baltic Mythology
Latvian form of SAULĖ.
SAULĖ   f   Lithuanian, Baltic Mythology
Means "sun" in Lithuanian. This was the name of the Lithuanian sun goddess.
SEANÁN   m   Irish
Variant of SENÁN.
SELENE   f   Greek Mythology, Greek
Means "moon" in Greek. This was the name of a Greek goddess of the moon, sometimes identified with the goddess Artemis.
SEPPO (1)   m   Finnish, Finnish Mythology
Derived from Finnish seppä "smith". Seppo Ilmarinen ("the smith Ilmarinen") was the name of a master craftsman in the Finnish epic the 'Kalevala'.
SETH (1)   m   English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "placed" or "appointed" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the third named son of Adam and Eve. In England this name came into use after the Protestant Reformation.
SHAHRIVAR   m   Persian Mythology
Modern Persian form of Avestan Kshathra Vairya meaning "desirable power". In Zoroastrianism this was the name of a god of metal and a protector of the weak. This is also the name of the sixth month of the Iranian calendar.
SHIFRA   f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of SHIPHRAH.
SHIMON   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of SIMEON (and SIMON).
SHIMSHON   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of SAMSON.
SHLOMO   m   Hebrew
Hebrew form of SOLOMON.
SHMUEL   m   Hebrew
Hebrew form of SAMUEL.
SHOSHANNAH   f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of SUSANNA.
SHULAMMIT   f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of SHULAMMITE.
SHULAMMITE   f   Hebrew, Biblical
Derived from Hebrew שָׁלוֹם (shalom) "peace". This name occurs in the Song of Songs in the Old Testament.
SIAVASH   m   Persian, Persian Mythology
Means "possessing black stallions" in Avestan. This is the name of a prince in the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh'.
SIBYLLA   f   Greek, German, Swedish, Late Roman, Late Greek
Greek and Latinate form of SIBYL.
SIGURD   m   Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse name Sigurðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and varðr "guardian". Sigurd was the hero of the Norse legend the 'Volsungasaga', which tells how his foster-father Regin sent him to recover a hoard of gold guarded by the dragon Fafnir. After slaying the dragon Sigurd tasted some of its blood, enabling him to understand the language of birds, who told him that Regin was planning to betray him. In a later adventure, Sigurd disguised himself as Gunnar (his wife Gudrun's brother) and rescued the maiden Brynhildr from a ring of fire, with the result that Gunnar and Brynhildr were married. When the truth eventually came out, Brynhildr took revenge upon Sigurd. The stories of the German hero Siegfried were in part based on him.
SILAS   m   English, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Probably a short form of SILVANUS. This is the name of a companion of Saint Paul in the New Testament. Paul refers to him as Silvanus in his epistles, though it is possible that Silas was in fact a Greek form of the Hebrew name SAUL (via Aramaic).... [more]
SILVANUS   m   Roman Mythology, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman name derived from Latin silva "wood, forest". Silvanus was the Roman god of forests. This name appears in the New Testament belonging to one of Saint Paul's companions, also called Silas.
SILVIUS   m   Late Roman, Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin silva "wood, forest". This was the family name of several of the legendary kings of Alba Longa. It was also the name of an early saint martyred in Alexandria.
SINDRI   m   Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Possibly means either "small, trivial" or else "sparkling" in Old Norse. In Norse legend this was the name of a dwarf who, with his brother Brokk, made many magical items for the gods.
SIWARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Variant of SIGIWARD.
SOHRAB   m   Persian, Persian Mythology
Possibly means either "illustrious, shining" or "red water" in Persian. In the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh' this is the name of the son of the hero Rostam.
SOKRATIS   m   Greek
Modern Greek form of SOCRATES.
SOPHIA   f   English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.... [more]
SOROUSH   m   Persian Mythology, Persian
Modern Persian form of Avestan Sraosha meaning "obedience". In Zoroastrianism this was the name of a Yazata (or angel), later equated with the angel Gabriel.
SPARTACUS   m   History
Means "from the city of Sparta" in Latin. Spartacus was the name of a Thracian-born Roman slave who led a slave revolt in Italy in the 1st century BC. He was eventually killed in battle and many of his followers were crucified.
SPYRIDON   m   Greek, Late Greek
Late Greek name derived from Greek σπυριδιον (spyridion) meaning "basket" or Latin spiritus meaning "spirit". Saint Spyridon was a 4th-century sheep farmer who became the bishop of Tremithus and suffered during the persecutions of Diocletian.
STEPHANOS   m   Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek, Greek
Ancient and modern Greek form of STEPHEN.
STYLIANOS   m   Greek, Late Greek
Derived from Greek στυλος (stylos) meaning "pillar". Saint Stylianos was a 7th-century hermit from Adrianopolis in Asia Minor who is regarded as a patron saint of children.
SUIBHNE   m   Irish, Scottish, Ancient Irish
Means "well-going" in Gaelic. This was the name of a 7th-century high king of Ireland.
SUIBNE   m   Irish
Variant of SUIBHNE.
SVANHILD   f   Norwegian, Norse Mythology
Scandinavian cognate of SWANHILD. In Norse legend she was the daughter of Sigurd and Gudrun.
SWITHIN   m   History
From the Old English name Swiðhun or Swiþhun, derived from swiþ "strong" and perhaps hun "bear cub". Saint Swithin was a 9th-century bishop of Winchester.
SWITHUN   m   History
Variant of SWITHIN.
SYNTYCHE   f   Biblical, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek name meaning "common fate". This is the name of a woman mentioned in Paul's epistle to the Philippians in the New Testament.
TABITHA   f   English, Biblical, Biblical Greek
Means "gazelle" in Aramaic. Tabitha in the New Testament was a woman restored to life by Saint Peter. Her name is translated into Greek as Dorcas (see Acts 9:36). As an English name, Tabitha became common after the Protestant Reformation. It was popularized in the 1960s by the television show 'Bewitched', in which Tabitha (sometimes spelled Tabatha) is the daughter of the main character.
TADHG   m   Irish, Scottish
Means "poet" in Irish. This was the name of an 11th-century king of Connacht.
TAHMASP   m   Ancient Persian
Persian form of the Avestan name Takhmaspa, which was derived from takhma "strong, brave, valiant" and aspa "horse". This name was borne by two Safavid shahs of Persia.
TAHMURAS   m   Persian Mythology
Persian form of Avestan Takhma Urupi meaning "strong body". Takhma Urupi is a hero from the Avesta who later appears in the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh'.
TALIESIN   m   Welsh, Arthurian Romance
Means "shining brow", derived from Welsh tal "brow" and iesin "shining". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh poet and bard. In later Welsh legends he is portrayed as a wizard and prophet, or as a companion of King Arthur.
TAMAR   f   Hebrew, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "palm tree" in Hebrew. According to the Old Testament Tamar was the daughter-in-law of Judah and later his wife. This was also the name of a daughter of King David. She was raped by her half-brother Amnon, leading to his murder by her brother Absalom. The name was borne by a 12th-century ruling queen of Georgia who presided over the kingdom at the peak of its power.
TANITH   f   Near Eastern Mythology
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "serpent lady". This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars.
TAPIO   m   Finnish, Finnish Mythology
Meaning unknown. Tapio was the Finnish god of forests, animals, and hunting.
TATIUS   m   Roman Mythology, Ancient Roman
Roman family name of unknown meaning, possibly of Sabine origin. According to Roman legend, Titus Tatius was an 8th-century BC king of the Sabines who came to jointly rule over the Romans and Sabines with the Roman king Romulus.
THEKLA   f   German (Rare), Greek (Rare), Late Greek
From the ancient Greek name Θεοκλεια (Theokleia), which meant "glory of God" from the Greek elements θεος (theos) meaning "god" and κλεος (kleos) meaning "glory". This was the name of a 1st-century saint, appearing (as Θεκλα) in the apocryphal 'Acts of Paul and Thecla'. The story tells how Thecla listens to Paul speak about the virtues of chastity and decides to remain a virgin, angering both her mother and her suitor.
THEMISTOKLIS   m   Greek
Modern Greek form of THEMISTOCLES.
THEOBALD   m   English (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements theud "people" and bald "bold". The Normans brought the name to England, where it joined an existing Old English cognate. The medieval forms Tibald and Tebald were commonly Latinized as Theobaldus. It was rare by the 20th century.
THEODORA   f   English, Greek, Ancient Greek
Feminine form of THEODORE. This name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by several empresses including the influential wife of Justinian in the 6th century.
THEODOROS   m   Greek, Ancient Greek
Original Greek form of THEODORE.
THEODOSIA   f   Ancient Greek, Greek
Feminine form of THEODOSIUS.
THEOFANIA   f   Greek
Modern Greek form of THEOPHANIA.
THEOFANIS   m   Greek
Modern Greek form of THEOPHANES.
THEOFYLAKTOS   m   Greek
Modern Greek form of THEOPHYLAKTOS.
THILO   m   German
Variant of TILO.
THOMAS   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') which meant "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of an apostle. When he heard that Jesus had risen from the dead he initially doubted the story, until Jesus appeared before him and he examined his wounds himself. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.... [more]
THOR   m   Norse Mythology, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
From the Old Norse Þórr meaning "thunder", ultimately from the early Germanic *Þunraz. Thor was the Norse god of strength, thunder, war and storms, the son of Odin. He was armed with a hammer called Mjolnir, and wore an enchanted belt that doubled his strength.
TIARNACH   m   Irish
Modern Irish form of TIGHEARNACH.
TIARNÁN   m   Irish
Modern Irish form of TIGHEARNÁN.
TILL   m   German
From Tielo, a Medieval Low German diminutive of names that began with Diet (for example DIETRICH), originally from Germanic theud meaning "people".
TILLO   m   German (Rare)
Variant of TILO.
TILO   m   German
From Tielo, a Low German diminutive of names that began with Diet (for example DIETRICH), from the Germanic element theud meaning "people". Saint Tillo was a 7th-century man of Saxony who was kidnapped and brought to the Low Countries by raiders. After his release he became a Benedictine monk and did missionary work in France.
TIMO (2)   m   German, Dutch
From Thiemo, an old short form of Thietmar (see DIETMAR).
TIMON   m   Ancient Greek, Biblical, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Dutch
Derived from Greek τιμαω (timao) meaning "to honour, to esteem". It appears briefly in the New Testament. This is also the name of the main character in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Timon of Athens' (1607).
TIMOTHEA   f   Ancient Greek, Greek
Feminine form of TIMOTHY.
TIMUR   m   History, Tatar, Chechen, Kazakh, Uzbek, Russian
From the Turkic name Temür meaning "iron". Timur, also known as Tamerlane (from Persian تیمور لنگ (Timur e Lang) meaning "Timur the lame"), was a 14th-century Turkic leader who conquered large areas of Western Asia.
TIRTZAH   f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of TIRZAH.
TITUS   m   Ancient Roman, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Roman praenomen, or given name, which is of unknown meaning, possibly related to Latin titulus "title of honour". It is more likely of Oscan origin, since it was borne by the legendary Sabine king Titus Tatius.... [more]
TOBIAS   m   Biblical, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Greek form of TOBIAH. This is the name of the hero of the apocryphal Book of Tobit, which appears in many English versions of the Old Testament. It relates how Tobit's son Tobias, with the help of the angel Raphael, is able to drive away a demon who has plagued Sarah, who subsequently becomes his wife. This story was popular in the Middle Ages, and the name came into occasional use in parts of Europe at that time. In England it became common after the Protestant Reformation.
TOVIA   m & f   Hebrew
Hebrew form of TOBIAH, also used as a feminine form.
TRISTAN   m   Welsh, English, French, Arthurian Romance
Old French form of the Pictish name Drustan, a diminutive of DRUST. The spelling was altered by association with Latin tristis "sad". Tristan is a character in medieval French tales, probably inspired by older Celtic legends, and ultimately merged into Arthurian legend. According to the story Tristan was sent to Ireland in order to fetch Isolde, who was to be the bride of King Mark of Cornwall. On the way back, Tristan and Isolde accidentally drink a potion which makes them fall in love. Their tragic story was very popular in the Middle Ages, and the name has occasionally been used since that time.
TRYFON   m   Greek
Modern Greek form of TRYPHON.
TRYPHOSA   f   Biblical, Biblical Greek, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek τρυφη (tryphe) meaning "softness, delicacy". In the New Testament this name is mentioned briefly as belonging to a companion of Tryphena.
TUULIKKI   f   Finnish, Finnish Mythology
Means "little wind" in Finnish, derived from tuuli "wind". This was the name of a Finnish forest goddess, the daughter of Tapio.
TUVYA   m   Hebrew
Hebrew form of TOBIAH.
TYBALT   m   Literature
Medieval form of THEOBALD. This is the name of a cousin of Juliet killed by Romeo in Shakespeare's drama 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).
TYR   m   Norse Mythology
Norse form of the name of the Germanic god Tiwaz, related to Indo-European dyeus (see ZEUS). In Norse mythology Tyr was the god of war and justice, the son of the god Odin. He carried a spear in his left hand, since his right hand was bitten off by the wolf Fenrir. At the time of the end of the world, the Ragnarok, Tyr will slay and be slain by the giant hound Garm.
TZILA   f   Hebrew
Hebrew form of ZILLAH.
TZION   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of ZION.
TZIPPORAH   f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of ZIPPORAH.
TZIVIA   f   Hebrew
Hebrew form of ZIBIAH.
UKKO   m   Finnish, Finnish Mythology
Means "old man" in Finnish. In Finnish mythology Ukko is the god of the sky and thunder.
ULRIC   m   English (Rare)
Middle English form of the Old English name Wulfric meaning "wolf power". When it is used in modern times, it is usually as a variant of ULRICH.
ULRICH   m   German, French, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Odalric meaning "prosperity and power", from the element odal "heritage" combined with ric "power". It has long been confused with the Germanic name Hulderic. This was the name of two German saints. Another famous bearer was Ulrich Zwingli (1484-1531), also known as Huldrych, the leader of the Protestant Reformation in Switzerland.
URI   m   Biblical, Biblical Latin, Hebrew
Means "my light" in Hebrew. This was the name of the father of Bezalel in the Old Testament.
URIEL   m   Biblical, Hebrew
From the Hebrew name אוּרִיאֵל ('Uri'el) which meant "God is my light". Uriel was one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition. He is mentioned only in the Apocrypha, for example in the Book of Enoch where he warns Noah of the coming flood.
URIEN   m   Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Means "privileged birth" from Celtic orbo "privileged" and gen "birth". In Welsh legend and Arthurian romances Urien is a king of Gore and the husband of Morgan le Fay.
UZZI   m   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Means "my power" in Hebrew. This is the name of several minor characters in the Old Testament.
UZZIEL   m   Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Means "my power is God" in Hebrew. This is the name of several minor characters in the Old Testament.
VÁCLAV   m   Czech, Slovak
Contracted form of the older name Veceslav, from the Slavic elements veche "more" and slava "glory". Saint Václav (known as Wenceslas in English) was a 10th-century duke of Bohemia murdered by his brother. He is the patron saint of the Czech Republic. This was also the name of several Bohemian kings.
VAHAGN   m   Armenian Mythology, Armenian
From Avestan Verethragna meaning "breaking of defense, victory". In Armenian mythology this was the name of the heroic god of war.
VASCO   m   Spanish, Portuguese, Italian
From the medieval Spanish name Velasco which possibly meant "crow" in Basque. A famous bearer was the 15th-century Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama, the first person to sail from Europe around Africa to India.
VASILIOS   m   Greek
Modern Greek form of BASIL (1).
VASILIS   m   Greek
Modern Greek form of BASIL (1).
VĚNCESLAV   m   Czech (Rare)
Czech variant of VÁCLAV, via the Latinized form Venceslaus.
VIDAR   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
From the Old Norse Víðarr, which is possibly derived from víðr "wide" and arr "warrior". In Norse mythology Víðarr was the son of Odin and Grid. At the time of the end of the world, the Ragnarok, he will avenge his father's death.
VIRGILIUS   m   Late Roman
Medieval Latin form of VERGILIUS, altered by association with Latin virgo "maiden" or virga "wand".
VIRGINIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Romanian, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman family name Verginius or Virginius which is of unknown meaning, but long associated with Latin virgo "maid, virgin". According to a legend, it was the name of a Roman woman killed by her father so as to save her from the clutches of a crooked official.... [more]
VISSARION   m   Russian, Greek
Russian form and modern Greek transcription of BESSARION.
VIVIEN (2)   f   Literature
Used by Alfred Lord Tennyson as the name of the Lady of the Lake in his Arthurian epic 'Idylls of the King' (1859). Tennyson may have based it on VIVIENNE, but it possibly arose as a misreading of NINIAN. A famous bearer was British actress Vivien Leigh (1913-1967), who played Scarlett O'Hara in 'Gone with the Wind'.
VLADIMERU   m   Medieval Slavic
Church Slavic form of VLADIMIR.
VLADIMIR   m   Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovene, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic element vladeti "rule" combined with meru "great, famous". The second element has also been associated with miru meaning "peace, world". This was the name of an 11th-century Grand Prince of Kiev who is venerated as a saint because of his efforts to Christianize his realm (Kievan Rus). It was also borne by the founder of the former Soviet state, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924).
VLADISLAV   m   Russian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Bulgarian, Serbian, Croatian, Medieval Slavic
Derived from the Slavic elements vladeti "rule" and slava "glory".
VÖLUND   m   Norse Mythology
Scandinavian form of WIELAND.
WALGANUS   m   Arthurian Romance
Latin form of GAWAIN.
WALTER   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote 'Ivanhoe' and other notable works.
WALTHER   m   German, Ancient Germanic
German form of WALTER. This name was borne by the 13th-century German poet Walther von der Vogelweide.
WAYLAND   m   English
From Weland, the Old English cognate of WIELAND.
WENDELIN   m   German, Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Old diminutive of Germanic names beginning with the element Wandal (see WENDEL). Saint Wendelin was a 6th-century hermit of Trier in Germany.
WIELAND   m   German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements wela possibly meaning "skill" and land meaning "land". In Germanic mythology Wieland (called Völundr in Old Norse) was an unequaled smith and craftsman.
WILFRED   m   English
Means "desiring peace" from Old English wil "will, desire" and friþ "peace". Saint Wilfrid was a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon bishop. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 19th century.
WILFRID   m   English
Variant of WILFRED.
WILHELM   m   German, Polish, Ancient Germanic
German cognate of WILLIAM. This was the name of two German Emperors. It was also the middle name of several philosophers from Germany: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831), Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900), and Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (1646-1716), who was also a notable mathematician.
WINFRED   m   English
Means "friend of peace" from the Old English elements wine "friend" and friþ "peace". This was the birth name of the 8th-century missionary Saint Boniface. It became rare after the Norman conquest, though it was revived in the 19th century.
WITOLD   m   Polish, German
Polish form of VYTAUTAS. Alternatively it could be derived from the Germanic name WIDALD.
WYBERT   m   Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigberht, composed of the elements wig "battle" and beorht "bright".
WYMOND   m   Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigmund, composed of the elements wig "battle" and mund "protector".
WYOT   m   Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigheard, composed of the elements wig "battle" and heard "brave, hardy".
WYSTAN   m   English (Rare)
From the Old English name Wigstan, composed of the elements wig "battle" and stan "stone". This was the name of a 9th-century Anglo-Saxon saint. It became rare after the Norman conquest, and in modern times it is chiefly known as the first name of the British poet W. H. Auden (1907-1973).
XANTHIPPI   f   Greek
Modern Greek form of XANTHIPPE.
XENE   f   Greek
Variant of XENIA.
XENIA   f   Greek, Ancient Greek
Means "hospitality" in Greek, a derivative of ξενος (xenos) "foreigner, guest". This was the name of a 5th-century saint who is venerated in the Eastern Church.
YAAKOV   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JACOB.
YACHIN   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JACHIN.
YAEL   f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JAEL.
YAIR   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JAIR.
YECHEZKEL   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of EZEKIEL.
YEHIEL   m   Hebrew
Hebrew form of JEHIEL.
YEHONATAN   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JEHONATHAN.
YEHOSHUA   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JOSHUA.
YEHUDAH   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JUDAH.
YEHUDI   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JEHUDI.
YEHUDIT   f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JUDITH.
YEMIMA   f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JEMIMA.
YISHAI   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of JESSE.
YISRA'EL   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of ISRAEL.
YISSAKHAR   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of ISSACHAR.
YITZHAK   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of ISAAC. This was the name of two recent Israeli prime ministers.
YOAV   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JOAB.
YOCHANAN   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JOHN (and JOHANAN). This is a contracted form of the longer name יְהוֹחָנָן (Yehochanan).
YOCHEVED   f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JOCHEBED.
YOEL   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JOEL.
YONAH   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JONAH.
YONATAN   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Original Hebrew form of JONATHAN.
YORAM   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JORAM.
YOSEF   m   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JOSEPH.
YSOLT   f   Arthurian Romance
Old French form of ISOLDE, appearing in the 12th-century Old French poem 'Tristan' by Thomas of Britain.
YUVAL   m & f   Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of JUBAL. It is used as a masculine and feminine name in modern Hebrew.
YVAIN   m   Arthurian Romance
Form of OWAIN used by the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes for his Arthurian tales.
ZACHARIAH   m   English, Biblical
Variant of ZECHARIAH. This spelling is used in the King James Version of the Old Testament to refer to one of the kings of Israel (called Zechariah in other versions).
ZARATHUSTRA   m   History
Possibly means "golden camel" in Old Iranian, derived from zarat meaning "golden" combined with ushtra meaning "camel". Zarathustra was the Persian prophet who founded the ancient religion of Zoroastrianism about the 10th century BC.
ZARTOSHT   m   Persian
Modern Persian form of ZARATHUSTRA.
ZECHARIAH   m   Biblical, English
From the Hebrew name זְכַרְיָה (Zekharyah) meaning "YAHWEH remembers". This is the name of many characters in the Old Testament, including the prophet Zechariah, the author of the Book of Zechariah. The name also appears in the New Testament belonging to the father of John the Baptist, who was temporarily made dumb because of his disbelief. He is regarded as a saint by Christians. In some versions of the New Testament his name is spelled in the Greek form Zacharias or the English form Zachary. As an English given name, Zechariah has been in occasional use since the Protestant Reformation.
ZENOVIA   f   Greek
Modern Greek form of ZENOBIA.
ZIEMOWIT   m   Polish
From an old Slavic name derived from the elements sem "family" and vit "lord, master". This was the name of a legendary Piast prince of Poland. It was also borne by several other Piast rulers.
ZINON   m   Greek
Modern Greek form of Zenon (see ZENO).
ZINOVIA   f   Greek
Modern Greek form of ZENOBIA.
ZIPPORAH   f   Biblical, Hebrew
From the Hebrew name צִפּוֹרָה (Tzipporah), derived from צִפּוֹר (tzippor) meaning "bird". In the Old Testament this is the name of the Midianite wife of Moses. She was the daughter of the priest Jethro.
ZOE   f   English, Greek, Italian, Ancient Greek
Means "life" in Greek. From early times it was adopted by Hellenized Jews as a translation of EVE. It was borne by two early Christian saints, one martyred under emperor Hadrian, the other martyred under Diocletian. The name was common in the Byzantine Empire, being borne by a ruling empress of the 11th century. As an English name, Zoe has only been in use since the 19th century. It has generally been more common among Eastern Christians (in various spellings).
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