Names with Relationship "from place name"

This is a list of names in which the relationship is from place name.
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ABILENEfEnglish
From a place name mentioned briefly in the New Testament. It is probably from Hebrew אָבֵל ('avel) meaning "meadow, grassy area". It has occasionally been used as a given name in modern times.
ÁFRICAfSpanish
Spanish form of AFRICA (1). It is usually taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora de África, the patron saint of the Spanish enclave of Ceuta in North Africa.
AFRICA (1)fAfrican American (Rare)
From the name of the continent, which is of Latin origin, possibly from the Afri people who lived near Carthage in North Africa. This rare name is used most often by African-American parents.
AFRICANUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen derived from the place name AFRICA, which in Roman times referred only to North Africa. This was the agnomen of the 3rd-century BC Roman general Scipio Africanus, who was honoured with it after his victory over Carthage in the Second Punic War. His descendants used it as a cognomen.
AMERICAfEnglish
In the English-speaking world, this name is usually given in reference to the United States of America (see AMERIGO). It came into use as an American name in the 19th century.
ARARATmArmenian
From the name of a mountain in eastern Turkey (formerly part of Armenia), the place where Noah's Ark came to rest according to the Old Testament.
ARMENmArmenian
Derived from the name of the country of ARMENIA (which is in fact named Հայաստան (Hayastan) in Armenian).
ASIA (1)fEnglish (Modern), Italian (Modern)
From the name of the continent, which is perhaps derived from Akkadian asu, meaning "east".
BABYLASmLate Greek, French (Rare)
Derived from the name of the ancient Mesopotamian city of Babylon. Saint Babylas was a 3rd-century patriarch of Antioch who was martyred during the reign of the Roman emperor Decius.
BELÉNfSpanish
Spanish form of Bethlehem, the name of the town in Judah where King David and Jesus were born. The town's name is from Hebrew בֵּית־לֶחֶם (Beit-lechem) meaning "house of bread".
BERLINfVarious
From the name of the city in Germany, which is of uncertain meaning.
BETHÂNIAfPortuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese variant form of BETHANY.
BETHANIAfSpanish (Latin American)
Spanish variant form of BETHANY.
BETHANYfEnglish
From the name of a biblical town, Βηθανια (Bethania) in Greek, which is probably of Aramaic or Hebrew origin, possibly meaning "house of affliction" or "house of figs". In the New Testament the town of Bethany is the home of Lazarus and his sisters Mary and Martha. It has been in use as a rare given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, used primarily by Catholics in honour of Mary of Bethany. In America it became moderately common after the 1950s.
BETHELfEnglish
From an Old Testament place name meaning "house of God" in Hebrew. This was a town north of Jerusalem, where Jacob saw his vision of the stairway. It is occasionally used as a given name.
BRISTOLfEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the city in southwest England which means "the site of the bridge".
BRITANNIAfEnglish (Rare)
From the Latin name of the island of Britain, in occasional use as an English given name since the 18th century. This is also the name of the Roman female personification of Britain pictured on some British coins.
BRITTANYfEnglish
From the name of the region in the northwest of France, called in French Bretagne. It was named for the Britons who settled there after the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the invasions of the Anglo-Saxons. As a given name, it first came into common use in America in the 1970s.
BROOKLYNfEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the borough of New York City, originally derived from Dutch Breukelen meaning "broken land". It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn.
CAIROmEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the city in Egypt, called القاهرة (al-Qahirah) in Arabic, meaning "the victorious".
CARME (1)fGalician, Catalan
Galician and Catalan form of CARMEL.
CARMELfEnglish, Jewish
From the title of the Virgin Mary Our Lady of Carmel. כַּרְמֶל (Karmel) (meaning "garden" in Hebrew) is a mountain in Israel mentioned in the Old Testament. It was the site of several early Christian monasteries. As an English given name, it has mainly been used by Catholics.
CARMELAfItalian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of CARMEL.
CARMELOmSpanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian masculine form of CARMEL.
CARMOm & fPortuguese
Portuguese form of CARMEL.
CAVANmEnglish
Either from the name of the Irish county, which is derived from Irish cabhán "hollow", or else from the Irish surname CAVAN.
CHELSEAfEnglish
From the name of a district in London, originally derived from Old English and meaning "landing place for chalk or limestone". It has been in general use as an English given name since the 1970s.
CHINAfEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the Asian country, ultimately derived from Qin, the name of a dynasty that ruled there in the 3rd century BC.
DEEf & mEnglish
Short form of names beginning with D. It may also be given in reference to the Dee River in Scotland.
DELPHIAfEnglish
Possibly from the name of the Greek city of Delphi, the site of an oracle of Apollo, which is possibly related to Greek δελφυς (delphys) "womb". It was used in the play 'The Prophetess' (1647), in which it belongs to the title prophetess.
DELPHINUSmLate Roman
Masculine form of DELPHINA. Saint Delphinus was a 4th-century bishop of Bordeaux.
DEVONm & fEnglish
Variant of DEVIN. It may also be partly inspired by the name of the county of Devon in England, which got its name from the Dumnonii, a Celtic tribe.
EDENf & mHebrew, English (Modern)
Means "place of pleasure" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament the Garden of Eden was the place where the first people, Adam and Eve, lived before they were expelled.
EIREANNfEnglish (Rare), Irish (Rare)
From Éireann, the genitive case of Gaelic Éire, meaning "Ireland". It is commonly Anglicized as Erin.
ÉRIUfIrish Mythology
From the name of an Irish goddess, who according to legend gave her name to Ireland (which is called Éire in Irish). In reality, the goddess probably got her name from that of the island, which may mean something like "abundant land" in Old Irish.
FÁTIMAfPortuguese, Spanish
From the name of a town in Portugal, which is derived from the Arabic feminine name FATIMAH, apparently after a Moorish princess who converted to Christianity during the Reconquista. The town became an important Christian pilgrimage center after 1917 when three local children reported witnessing repeated apparitions of the Virgin Mary.
FIRATmTurkish
From the Turkish name of the Euphrates River, which was derived from Old Persian Ufratu, itself derived from Elamite or Sumerian.
FRANCEfFrench
From the name of the country, sometimes considered a feminine form of FRANK (1) or short form of FRANÇOISE, both of which are ultimately related to the name of the country.
GETHSEMANEfVarious
From a biblical place name, the garden where Jesus was arrested, located on the Mount of Olives near Jerusalem. It is derived from Γεθσημανι (Gethsemani), the Greek form of an Aramaic name meaning "oil vat". It is very rarely used as a given name.
GIORDANOmItalian
Italian form of JORDAN.
HARELmHebrew
Means "altar, mountain of God" in Hebrew. In the Hebrew Old Testament this word is applied to the altar in the temple in Jerusalem (Ezekiel 43:15).
INDIAfEnglish
From the name of the country, which is itself derived from the name of the Indus River. The river's name is ultimately from Sanskrit सिन्धु (Sindhu) meaning "body of trembling water, river".
INDIANAf & mEnglish
From the name of the American state, which means "land of the Indians". This is the name of the hero in the 'Indiana Jones' series of movies, starring Harrison Ford.
IRELANDfEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the European island country, derived from Irish Gaelic Éire, which may mean something like "abundant land" in Old Irish.
ITALIAfItalian
From the Italian name of the country of Italy, Italia (see ITALUS).
ITALUSmRoman Mythology
Means "of Italy" in Latin. In Roman legend Italus was the father of Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. He supposedly gave his name to the region known as Italia or Italy (in fact the region may have gotten its name from Oscan Víteliú meaning "land of bulls").
JERICHOmEnglish (Modern)
From the name of a city in Israel which is mentioned several times in the Old Testament. The meaning of the city's name is uncertain, but it may be related to the Hebrew word יָרֵחַ (yareach) meaning "moon", or otherwise to the Hebrew word רֵיחַ (reyach) meaning "fragrant".
JORDÀmCatalan
Catalan form of JORDAN.
JORDAANmDutch
Dutch form of JORDAN.
JORDÁNmSpanish
Spanish form of JORDAN.
JORDANm & fEnglish, French, Macedonian
From the name of the river which flows between the countries of Jordan and Israel. The river's name in Hebrew is יַרְדֵן (Yarden), and it is derived from יָרַד (yarad) meaning "descend" or "flow down". In the New Testament John the Baptist baptizes Jesus Christ in its waters, and it was adopted as a personal name in Europe after crusaders brought water back from the river to baptize their children. There may have been some influence from the Germanic name JORDANES, notably borne by a 6th-century Gothic historian.... [more]
JORDANESmAncient Germanic
Germanic name, probably related to the Norse element jord meaning "land". This name was borne by a 6th-century Roman author of Gothic background, who wrote a history of the Goths. It is possible that the spelling of his name was influenced by that of the Jordan River.
JORDÃOmPortuguese
Portuguese form of JORDAN.
JOURDAINmFrench
French (traditional) form of JORDAN.
KAILASHmIndian, Hindi, Marathi
From the name of a mountain in the Himalayas which is believed to be the paradise of the Hindu god Shiva. It possibly means "crystal" in Sanskrit.
KASHIfIndian, Hindi
From the name of a holy city in India, famous for its many temples dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. Its name is derived from Sanskrit काशि (kashi) meaning "shining".
KASIfIndian, Telugu, Tamil
Southern Indian form of KASHI.
KENYAfEnglish, African American
From the name of the African country. The country is named for Mount Kenya, which in the Kikuyu language is called Kĩrĩnyaga meaning "the one having stripes". It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 1960s.
KERRYm & fEnglish
From the name of the Irish county, called Ciarraí in Irish Gaelic, which means "CIAR's people".
KIMBERLYfEnglish
From the name of the city of Kimberley in South Africa, which was named after Lord KIMBERLEY (1826-1902). The city came to prominence in the late 19th century during the Boer War. Kimberly has been used as a given name since the mid-20th century, eventually becoming very popular as a feminine name.
KOBE (2)mVarious
From the name of the city in Japan. The parents of basketball player Kobe Bryant (1978-) chose this name after seeing Kobe beef (which is from the Japanese city) on a menu.
LEHImMormon
From an Old Testament place name meaning "jawbone" in Hebrew, so called because it was the site where the hero Samson defeated 1,000 warriors using only the jawbone of a donkey as a weapon. It is also used in the Book of Mormon as the name of a prophet.
LONDONf & mEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the capital city of the United Kingdom, the meaning of which is uncertain. As a surname it was borne by the American author Jack London (1876-1916).
LORENA (1)fSpanish, Portuguese, Italian, Croatian
Spanish, Portuguese and Italian form of LORRAINE.
LORETOf & mItalian, Spanish
From the name of a town in Italy, originally called Lauretum in Latin, meaning "laurel grove". Supposedly in the 13th century the house of the Virgin Mary was miraculously carried by angels from Nazareth to the town.
LORNAfEnglish
Created by the author R. D. Blackmore for the title character in his novel 'Lorna Doone' (1869), set in southern England, which describes the dangerous love between John Ridd and Lorna Doone. Blackmore may have based the name on the Scottish place name Lorne or on the title 'Marquis of Lorne' (see LORNE).
LORNEmEnglish
From the title 'Marquis of Lorne', which was based on the Scottish place name Lorne, itself possibly derived from the name of the legendary king of Dál Riata, Loarn mac Eirc. This was the title of the first Governor General of Canada, where it has since been most frequently used as a given name. A famous bearer was the Canadian actor Lorne Greene (1915-1987).
LORRAINEfEnglish
From the name of a region in France, originally meaning "kingdom of LOTHAR". Lothar was a Frankish king, the great-grandson of Charlemagne, whose realm was in the part of France that is now called Lorraine, or in German Lothringen (from Latin Lothari regnum). As a given name, it has been used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century, perhaps due to its similar sound with Laura. It became popular after World War I when the region was in the news, as it was contested between Germany and France.
LYDIAfEnglish, German, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "from Lydia" in Greek. Lydia was a region on the west coast of Asia Minor, said to be named for the legendary king LYDOS. In the New Testament this is the name of a woman converted to Christianity by Saint Paul. In the modern era the name has been in use since the Protestant Reformation.
MACARENAfSpanish
From the name of a barrio (district) in Seville, which got its name from a temple which may have been named for a person named Macarius (see MACARIO). The Virgin of Macarena, that is Mary, is widely venerated in Seville.
MADINAfKazakh, Avar, Chechen
From the name of the city of Medina, Arabic المدينة (al-Madinah), which means "the city". The Saudi city is considered an Islamic holy site because the Prophet Muhammad was based there for a period.
MAYLISfFrench
From the name of a town in southern France, possibly derived from Occitan mair "mother" and French lys "lily". It is also sometimes considered a combination of MARIE and lys.
MONTANAf & mEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the American state, which is derived from Latin montanus "mountainous".
MORIAHfEnglish (Modern)
From Hebrew מֹרִיָה (Moriyah) possibly meaning "seen by YAHWEH". This is a place name in the Old Testament, both the land where Abraham is to sacrifice Isaac and the mountain upon which Solomon builds the temple. They may be the same place. Since the 1980s it has occasionally been used as a feminine given name in America.
NAZARETf & mSpanish, Armenian
From Nazareth, the town in Galilee where Jesus lived. This name is feminine in Spanish and masculine in Armenian.
NAZARIUSmLate Roman
Latin name meaning "from Nazareth". Nazareth was the town in Galilee where Jesus lived. This name was borne by several early saints, including a man martyred with Celsus in Milan.
NUBIAfVarious
From the name of the ancient region and kingdom in Africa, south of Egypt. It possibly derives from the Egyptian word nbw meaning "gold".
ODESSAfVarious
From the name of a Ukrainian city that sits on the north coast of the Black Sea. This name can also be used as a feminine form of ODYSSEUS.
OLYMPOSmAncient Greek
From a Greek personal name which was derived from the place name OLYMPOS, the name of the mountain home of the Greek gods.
PARIS (2)fVarious
From the name of the capital city of France, which got its name from the ancient Celtic tribe known as the Parisii.
PHILADELPHIAfEnglish (Rare)
From the name of a city in Asia Minor mentioned in Revelation in the New Testament. The name of the city meant "brotherly love" from Greek φιλεω (phileo) "to love" and αδελφος (adelphos) "brother". It is also the name of a city in the United States.
RAVENNAfEnglish (Rare)
Either an elaboration of RAVEN, or else from the name of the city of Ravenna in Italy.
ROMA (2)fVarious
From the name of the Italian city, commonly called Rome in English.
ROMAEUSmLate Roman
Latin form of ROMEO.
ROMANUSmLate Roman
Latin form of ROMAN.
ROMULUSmRoman Mythology
Means "of Rome" in Latin. In Roman legend Romulus and Remus were the founders of the city of Rome.
SAMARAfEnglish (Modern), Portuguese (Brazilian)
Possibly derived from the name of the city of Samarra (in Iraq) or Samara (in Russia). The former appears in the title of the novel 'Appointment in Samarra' (1934) by John O'Hara, which refers to an ancient Babylonian legend about a man trying to evade death. Alternatively, this name could be derived from the word for the winged seeds which grow on trees such as maples and elms.... [more]
SHANNONf & mEnglish
From the name of the River Shannon, the longest river in Ireland, called Abha na tSionainn in Irish. It is associated with the goddess Sionann and is sometimes said to be named for her. However it is more likely the goddess was named after the river, which may be related to Old Irish sen "old, ancient". As a given name, it first became common in America after the 1940s.
SHARONfEnglish
From an Old Testament place name, in Hebrew שָׁרוֹן (Sharon), which means "plain", referring to the fertile plain near the coast of Israel. This is also the name of a type of flowering shrub, the rose of Sharon. It has been in use as a given name since the 1920s, possibly inspired by the heroine in the serial novel 'The Skyrocket' (1925) by Adela Rogers St. Johns.
SIONANNfIrish Mythology
The name of an Irish goddess, a granddaughter of Lir, who was the personification of the River Shannon. Her name is derived from the name of the river (see SHANNON).
SKENANDOAmNative American, Oneida
Probably from the name of the Shenandoah River in the eastern United States, which is of uncertain origin. This was the name of an 18th-century Oneida chief.
SKYEfEnglish (Modern)
From the name of the Isle of Skye off the west coast of Scotland. It is sometimes considered a variant of SKY.
TRENTONmEnglish
From the name of a New Jersey city established in the 17th century by William Trent. It means "TRENT's town".
TYRONEmEnglish
From the name of a county in Northern Ireland which is derived from Irish Gaelic Tir Eoghain meaning "land of EOGHAN". This name was popularized by American actor Tyrone Power (1914-1958), who was named after his great-grandfather, an Irish actor.
URALmBashkir, Turkish
From the name of the Ural Mountains, of uncertain meaning, possibly from Turkic aral meaning "island, boundary". This is the name of the title character in the Bashkir epic 'Ural-batyr'.
VALENCIAfVarious
From the name of cities in Spain and Venezuela, both derived from Latin valentia meaning "strength, vigour".
VENKATAmIndian, Telugu, Kannada, Tamil, Malayalam
From the name of a sacred hill in southern India.
XABIERmBasque, Galician
Basque and Galician form of XAVIER.
YAMATOmJapanese
From YAMATO, an ancient name for Japan. It can also refer to the Yamato period in Japanese history, which lasted into the 8th century. The individual kanji are meaning "great" and meaning "harmony".
YAMUNAfTamil, Indian, Telugu
From the name of an Indian river, which is possibly derived from the name of the goddess YAMI.
YARDENm & fHebrew
Hebrew form of JORDAN.
YORDANmBulgarian
Bulgarian form of JORDAN.
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