Names with Relationship "from surname"

This is a list of names in which the relationship is from surname.
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ADAIR   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the given name EDGAR.
ADDISON   f & m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of ADAM". Its recent popularity as a feminine name stems from its similarity in sound to Madison.
AINSLEY   f & m   Scottish, English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ALDEN   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name EALDWINE.
ALGER   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name ALGAR.
ANDERSON   m   English
From a surname meaning "son of ANDREW".
ANSEL   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name ANSELM. A famous bearer was American photographer Ansel Adams (1902-1984).
ANSON   m   English
From a surname meaning "son of AGNES".
ARCHER   m   English
From an English surname meaning "bowman, archer", of Old French origin.
ASHLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the 1960s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls.
ASTON   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from either a place name meaning "east town" in Old English or from the given name ÆÐELSTAN.
AUDLEY   m   English
From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning "EALDGYÐ's clearing" in Old English.
AVERILL   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
AVERY   m & f   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
AYLMER   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of ELMER.
BAILEY   m & f   English
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.
BARRET   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of BARRETT.
BARRETT   m   English
From a surname probably meaning "strife" in Middle English, originally given to a quarrelsome person.
BECKETT   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which could be derived from various sources, including from Middle English beke meaning "beak" or bekke meaning "stream, brook".
BENSON   m   English
From a surname which originally meant "son of BENEDICT".
BENTLEY   m   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English beonet "bent grass" and leah "woodland, clearing". Various towns in England bear this name.
BENTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name, composed of Old English beonet "bent grass" and tun "enclosure".
BEVAN   m   Welsh
From a Welsh surname which was derived from ap Evan meaning "son of EVAN".
BEVERLY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's novel 'Beverly of Graustark' (1904).
BISHOP   m   English
Either from the English occupational surname, or else directly from the English word. It is ultimately derived from Greek επισκοπος (episkopos) "overseer".
BLAIR   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
BLAKE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
BOYD   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was possibly derived from the name of the island of Bute.
BRADEN   m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Bradáin meaning "descendant of BRADÁN".
BRADLEY   m   English
From a surname which originally came from a place name meaning "broad clearing" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the World War II American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
BRADY   m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Brádaigh meaning "descendant of BRÁDACH".
BRAND   m   English (Rare)
From a surname, a variant of BRANT.
BRANDON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "hill covered with broom" in Old English. It is sometimes also used as a variant of BRENDAN.
BRANDT   m   English
From a surname, a variant of BRANT.
BRANNON   m   English
From an Irish surname derived from Mac Branain, which means "descendant of BRAN (1)".
BRANSON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which meant "son of BRANDR".
BRANT   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old Norse name BRANDR.
BRENNAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname derived from Ó Braonáin meaning "descendant of Braonán". Braonán is a byname meaning "rain, moisture, drop" (with a diminutive suffix).
BRENT   m   English
From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, perhaps derived from a Celtic word meaning "hill".
BRETT   m & f   English
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).
BRITTON   m   English
Derived from a Middle English surname meaning "a Briton" (a Celt of England) or "a Breton" (an inhabitant of Brittany).
BROCK   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English brocc meaning "badger".
BRODIE   m   English (Modern)
Variant of BRODY.
BRODY   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place in Moray, Scotland. It probably means "ditch, mire" in Gaelic.
BROOK   m & f   English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived near a brook.
BROOKE   f   English
Variant of BROOK. The name came into use in the 1950s, probably influenced by American socialite Brooke Astor (1902-2007). It was further popularized by actress Brooke Shields (1965-).
BROOKS   m   English
From an English surname, a variant of BROOK.
BRUCE   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname, of Norman origin, which probably originally referred to the town of Brix in France. The surname was borne by Robert the Bruce, a Scottish hero of the 14th century who achieved independence from England and became the king of Scotland. It has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century. A notable bearer is the American musician Bruce Springsteen (1949-).
BRYANT   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name BRIAN.
BRYSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of BRICE".
BURTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "fortified town". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890), an explorer of Africa and Asia.
BYRNE   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Broin meaning "descendant of BRAN (1)".
CALLAHAN   m   English
From a surname, the Anglicized form of the Irish Ó Ceallacháin, which means "descendant of CEALLACHÁN".
CAMERON   m & f   English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
CAMPBELL   m   English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked mouth" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and béul "mouth".
CAREY   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of CIARDHA".
CARLISLE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the name of a city in northern England. The city was originally called by the Romans Luguvalium meaning "stronghold of LUGUS". Later the Brythonic element ker "fort" was appended to the name of the city.
CARLYLE   m   English
Variant of CARLISLE.
CARRAN   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Ó Corraidhín meaning "descendant of CORRAIDHÍN".
CARSON   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname of uncertain meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was the American scout Kit Carson (1809-1868).
CARTER   m   English
From an English surname which meant "one who uses a cart".
CARVER   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which meant "wood carver".
CARY   m & f   English
Variant of CAREY.
CASEY   m & f   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of CATHASACH". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers. In his case, Casey was a nickname acquired because he was raised in the town of Cayce, Kentucky.
CASSIDY   f & m   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".
CAVAN   m   English
Either from the name of the Irish county, which is derived from Irish cabhán "hollow", or else from the Irish surname CAVAN.
CECIL   m   English
From the Roman name Caecilius (see CECILIA). This was the name of a 3rd-century saint, a companion of Saint Cyprian. Though it was in use during the Middle Ages in England, it did not become common until the 19th century when it was given in honour of the noble Cecil family, who had been prominent since the 16th century. Their surname was derived from the Welsh given name Seisyll, which was derived from the Roman name Sextilius, a derivative of SEXTUS.
CHADWICK   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the name of towns in England, meaning "settlement belonging to CHAD" in Old English.
CHASE   m   English
From a surname meaning "chase, hunt" in Middle English, originally a nickname for a huntsman.
CHESTER   m   English
From a surname which originally belonged to a person who came from Chester, an old Roman settlement in Britain. The name of the settlement came from Latin castrum "camp, fortress".
CLARK   m   English
From an English surname meaning "cleric" or "scribe", from Old English clerec which originally meant "priest". A famous bearer of the surname was William Clark (1770-1838), an explorer of the west of North America. It was also borne by the American actor Clark Gable (1901-1960).
CLAY   m   English
From an English surname that originally referred to a person who lived near or worked with clay. This name can also be a short form of CLAYTON.
CLAYTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from various English place names, all meaning "clay settlement" in Old English.
CLIFFORD   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "ford by a cliff" in Old English.
CLIFTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "settlement by a cliff" in Old English.
CLINTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally from an Old English place name meaning "settlement on the River Glyme". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Bill Clinton (1946-).
CODY   m   English, Irish
From the Gaelic surname Ó Cuidighthigh, which means "descendant of CUIDIGHTHEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was the American frontiersman and showman Buffalo Bill Cody (1846-1917).
COHEN   m   English
From a common Jewish surname which was derived from Hebrew כֹּהֵן (kohen) meaning "priest". This surname was traditionally associated with the hereditary priests who claimed descent from the biblical Aaron.
COLBERT   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a Norman form of the Germanic name COLOBERT.
COLE   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the Old English byname COLA.
COLTON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "COLA's town".
CONNELL   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Conaill meaning "descendant of CONALL".
COOPER   m   English
From a surname meaning "barrel maker" in Middle English.
COREY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old Norse given name Kóri, of unknown meaning. This name became popular in the 1960s due to the character Corey Baker on the television series 'Julia'.
CORNELL   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name CORNELIUS.
CORWIN   m   English
From an English surname, derived from Old French cordoan "leather", ultimately from the name of the Spanish city of Cordova.
CORY   m   English
Variant of COREY.
COURTNEY   f & m   English
From an aristocratic English surname which was derived either from the French place name Courtenay (originally a derivative of the personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short") or else from a Norman nickname meaning "short nose". As a feminine name in America, it first became popular during the 1970s.
COY   m   English
From a surname which meant "quiet, shy, coy" from Middle English coi.
CRAIG   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic creag meaning "crag" or "rocks", originally indicating a person who lived near a crag.
CRAWFORD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "crow ford" in Old English.
CULLEN   m   English
From a surname, either CULLEN (1) or CULLEN (2).
CURTIS   m   English
From an English surname which originally meant "courteous" in Old French.
DALEY   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Dálaigh meaning "descendant of Dálach". The name Dálach means "assembly" in Gaelic.
DALTON   m   English
From an English surname which was originally from a place name meaning "valley town" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was John Dalton (1766-1844), the English chemist and physicist who theorized about the existence of atoms.
DALY   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of DALEY.
DANE   m   English
From an English surname which was either a variant of the surname DEAN or else an ethnic name referring to a person from Denmark.
DARBY   m & f   English
From an English surname, which was derived from the name of the town of Derby, meaning "deer town" in Old Norse.
DARRELL   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Norman French d'Airelle, originally denoting one who came from Airelle in France.
DARWIN   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name Deorwine which meant "dear friend". The surname was borne by the English naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882), the man who first proposed the theory of natural selection and subsequently revolutionized biology.
DAVIS   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name DAVID. A famous bearer of the surname was Jefferson Davis (1808-1889), the only president of the Confederate States of America.
DAWSON   m   English
From a surname meaning "son of DAVID". This name was popularized in the late 1990s by the television drama 'Dawson's Creek'.
DEAN   m   English
From a surname, see DEAN (1) and DEAN (2). The actor James Dean (1931-1955) was a famous bearer of the surname.
DEASÚN   m   Irish
Irish form of DESMOND.
DEDRICK   m   African American
From a surname which was derived from the given name DIEDERIK.
DEFOREST   m   English
From a French surname meaning "from the forest". It was originally given in honour of American author John Deforest (1826-1906).
DELANEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname: either the English surname DELANEY (1) or the Irish surname DELANEY (2).
DENZIL   m   English
From a surname which originally denoted a person from the manor of Denzell in Cornwall. This given name was borne by several members of the noble Holles family starting in the 16th century, notably the statesman Denzil Holles (1599-1680). They were named for John Denzel, an ancestor whose home was Denzell.
DERBY   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of DARBY.
DESMOND   m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Deasmhumhain meaning "South Munster", originally indicating a person who came from that region in Ireland.
DEVEREUX   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname, of Norman French origin, meaning "from Evreux". Evreux is a town in France.
DEVIN   m & f   English, Irish
From a surname, either the Irish surname DEVIN (1) or the English surname DEVIN (2).
DEXTER   m   English
From an occupational surname meaning "one who dyes" in Old English. It also coincides with the Latin word dexter meaning "right-handed, skilled".
DIXON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "DICK (1)'s son".
DONOVAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Donndubháin meaning "descendant of DONNDUBHÁN".
DORAN   m   Irish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Deoráin meaning "descendant of Deoradhán". The name Deoradhán means "exile, wanderer" in Gaelic.
DORIAN   m   English, French
The name was first used by Oscar Wilde in his novel 'The Picture of Dorian Gray' (1891), which tells the story of a man whose portrait ages while he stays young. Wilde may have taken it from the name of the ancient Greek tribe the Dorians, or from the surname DORAN.
DOUGLAS   m   Scottish, English
Anglicized form of the Scottish surname Dubhghlas, meaning "dark river" from Gaelic dubh "dark" and glais "water, river" (an archaic word related to glas "grey, green"). Douglas was originally a place name (for example, a tributary of the River Clyde), which then became a Scottish clan name borne by a powerful line of earls. It has been used as a given name since the 16th century.
DOUGLASS   m   Scottish
Variant of DOUGLAS.
DOYLE   m   Irish
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Dubhghaill meaning "descendant of Dubhghall" (see DOUGAL). Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) was the author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories.
DRAKE   m   English
From an English surname derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δρακων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent". This name coincides with the unrelated English word drake meaning "male duck".
DRISCOLL   m   English (Rare), Irish
From an Irish surname which was an Anglicized form of Ó Eidirsceóil meaning "descendant of the messenger".
DRUMMOND   m   English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was derived from various place names, themselves derived from Gaelic druim meaning "ridge".
DUANE   m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Ó Dubhán meaning "descendant of DUBHÁN".
DUBHGHLAS   m   Scottish
Original Gaelic form of DOUGLAS.
DUDLEY   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "Dudda's clearing" in Old English. The surname was borne by a British noble family.
DUSTIN   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Old Norse given name Þórsteinn (see TORSTEN). The name was popularized by the actor Dustin Hoffman (1937-), who was apparently named after the earlier silent movie star Dustin Farnum (1874-1929).
DWIGHT   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval feminine name Diot, a diminutive of Dionysia, the feminine form of DIONYSIUS. In America it was sometimes given in honour of Yale president Timothy Dwight (1752-1817). A famous bearer was the American president Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969).
DYSON   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which meant "son of DYE".
EASTON   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning "east town" in Old English.
EDISON   m   English
From an English surname which meant either "son of EDA (2)" or "son of ADAM". A famous bearer of the surname was the inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).
ELDRED   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from EALDRÆD.
ELIOT   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of ELLIOTT. A famous bearer of the surname was T. S. Eliot (1888-1965), an Anglo-American poet and dramatist, the writer of 'The Waste Land'. As a given name, it was borne by the American mob-buster Eliot Ness (1903-1957).
ELIOTT   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of ELLIOTT.
ELLERY   m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from the medieval masculine name HILARY.
ELLIOT   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of ELLIOTT.
ELLIOTT   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of the medieval name ELIAS.
ELLIS (1)   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the given name ELIJAH.
ELMER   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English name ÆÐELMÆR. In the United States it is sometimes given in honour of brothers Jonathan (1745-1817) and Ebenezer Elmer (1752-1843), who were active in early American politics.
ELVIS   m   English
Meaning unknown. It could possibly be a derivative of ALVIS or ELWIN. More likely, it is from the rare surname Elvis, which is ultimately derived from the given name ELOISE. The name was brought to public attention by the singer Elvis Presley (1935-1977), whose name came from his father's middle name.
ELWIN   m   English
Variant of ALVIN.
ELWYN   m   English
Variant of ALVIN.
EMERSON   m & f   English
From an English surname meaning "son of EMERY". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.
EMMET   m   English
Variant of EMMETT. It is used in Ireland in honour of the nationalist and rebel Robert Emmet (1778-1803).
EMMETT   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name EMMA.
EVELYN   f & m   English, German
From an English surname which was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
EVERETT   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name EVERARD.
EWART   m   English
From an English and Scottish surname which was either based on a Norman form of EDWARD, or else derived from a place name of unknown meaning.
FARRELL   m   English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Fearghail meaning "descendant of FEARGHAL".
FAUST   m   Literature
From a German surname which was derived from the Latin name FAUSTUS. This is the name of a character in German legends about a man who makes a deal with the devil. He is believed to be based on the character of Dr. Johann Faust (1480-1540). His story was adapted by writers such as Christopher Marlowe and Goethe.
FINDLAY   m   Scottish
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name FIONNLAGH.
FINNEGAN   m   Irish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Fionnagáin meaning "descendant of Fionnagán". The name Fionnagán is a diminutive of FIONN. This was the name of a character in James Joyce's novel 'Finnegans Wake' (1939), the title of which was based on a 19th-century Irish ballad called 'Finnegan's Wake'.
FLANAGAN   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Flannagáin meaning "descendant of Flannagán". The given name Flannagán is derived from Irish flann "red" and a diminutive suffix.
FLOYD   m   English
Variant of LLOYD.
FLYNN   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Floinn meaning "descendant of FLANN".
FOREST   m   English
Variant of FORREST, or else directly from the English word forest.
FORREST   m   English
From an English surname meaning "forest", originally belonging to a person who lived near a forest. In America it has sometimes been used in honour of the Confederate Civil War general Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877). This name was borne by the title character in the movie 'Forrest Gump' (1994) about a loveable simpleton. Use of the name increased when the movie was released, but has since faded away.
FOSTER (1)   m   English
From an English surname which has several different origins: see FOSTER (1), FOSTER (2), FOSTER (3) and FOSTER (4).
FOX   m   English (Rare)
Either from the English word fox or the surname Fox, which originally given as a nickname. The surname was borne by George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the Quakers.
FRANKLIN   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Middle English frankelin "freeman". A famous bearer of the surname was Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), an American statesman, inventor, scientist and philosopher. The name has commonly been given in his honour in the United States. It also received a boost during the term of American president Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945).
FRANKLYN   m   English
Variant of FRANKLIN.
FRASER   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which is of unknown meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was Simon Fraser (1776-1862), a Canadian explorer.
FRAZIER   m   Scottish, English
Variant of FRASER.
FULTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the name of the town of Foulden in Norfolk, itself meaning "bird hill" in Old English.
GAGE   m   English (Modern)
From an English surname of Old French origin meaning either "measure", originally denoting one who was an assayer, or "pledge", referring to a moneylender. It was popularized as a given name by a character from the book 'Pet Sematary' (1983) and the subsequent movie adaptation (1989).
GALLAGHER   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Gallchobhair meaning "descendant of GALLCHOBHAR".
GAREY   m   English
Variant of GARY.
GARFIELD   m   English
From a surname meaning "triangle field" in Old English. A famous bearer was American president James A. Garfield (1831-1881). It is now associated with the cat in Jim Davis's cartoon strip 'Garfield'.
GARLAND   m   English
From a surname meaning "triangle land" from Old English gara and land. The surname originally belonged to a person who owned a triangle-shaped piece of land.
GARNET (2)   m & f   English
From an English surname which either referred to a person who made hinges (Old French carne) or was derived from the Norman name GUARIN.
GARNETT   m & f   English
Variant of GARNET (2).
GARRET   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of GARRETT.
GARRETT   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the given name GERALD or GERARD. A famous bearer of the surname was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
GARRY   m   English
Variant of GARY.
GARY   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a Norman given name, which was itself originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear". This name was popularized in the late 1920s the American actor Gary Cooper (1901-1961), who took his stage name from the city of Gary in Indiana where his agent was born.
GIFFARD   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name GEBHARD.
GLADWIN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given name GLÆDWINE.
GLADWYN   m   English (Rare)
Variant of GLADWIN.
GLEN   m   Scottish, English
Variant of GLENN.
GLENN   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Gaelic gleann "valley". A famous bearer of the surname was American astronaut John Glenn (1921-2016).
GODDARD   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the Germanic given name GODEHARD.
GOODWIN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the given name GODWINE.
GORDON   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "spacious fort". It was originally used in honour of Charles George Gordon (1833-1885), a British general who died defending the city of Khartoum in Sudan.
GORETTI   f   Various
From the surname of Maria Goretti, a 20th-century Italian saint who forgave her murderer on her deathbed. Her surname was derived from the given name GREGORIO.
GRAEME   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GRAHAM.
GRAHAM   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname, originally derived from the English place name Grantham, which probably meant "gravelly homestead" in Old English. The surname was first taken to Scotland in the 12th century by the Norman baron William de Graham. A famous bearer was Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor who devised the telephone.
GRAHAME   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GRAHAM.
GRANT   m   English, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname which was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president. In America the name has often been given in his honour.
GRANVILLE   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a Norman place name GRAINVILLE.
GREER   f & m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name GREGOR.
GRENVILLE   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GRANVILLE.
GRIER   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GREER.
HALE (2)   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "nook, retreat" from Old English healh.
HALL   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English heall "manor, hall", originally belonging to a person who lived or worked in a manor.
HAMILTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English hamel "crooked, mutilated" and dun "hill". The surname was originally taken from the name of a town in Leicestershire, England (which no longer exists). A famous bearer of the surname was Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), a founding father of the United States who was killed in a duel with Aaron Burr.
HARDING   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name HEARD. A famous bearer of the surname was American president Warren G. Harding (1865-1923).
HARLAN   m   English
From a surname which was from a place name meaning "hare land" in Old English. In America it has sometimes been given in honour of Supreme Court justice John Marshall Harlan (1833-1911).
HARLAND   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of HARLAN.
HARLEY   m & f   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HARLOW   f & m   English
From a surname which was from a place name which was derived from Old English hær "rock" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
HARMON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name HERMAN.
HARPER   f & m   English
From an Old English surname which originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.
HARRIS   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name HARRY.
HARRISON   m   English
From an English surname which meant "son of HARRY". This was the surname of two American presidents, William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) and his grandson Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901). The actor Harrison Ford (1942-), who starred in such movies as 'Star Wars' and 'Indiana Jones', is a famous bearer.
HAYDEN   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HAYLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English town (meaning "hay clearing" from Old English heg "hay" and leah "clearing"). It was popularized by the British child actress Hayley Mills (1946-), though the name did not become common until over a decade after she first became famous.
HAYWOOD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "fenced wood" in Old English.
HEADLEY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of HEDLEY.
HEATH   m   English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived on a heath. It was popularized as a given name by the character Heath Barkley from the 1960s television series 'The Big Valley'.
HEDLEY   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "heather clearing" in Old English.
HENDERSON   m   English
From a Scottish surname meaning "son of HENRY".
HERSCHEL   m   Yiddish, American
Variant of HERSHEL.
HERSHEL   m   Yiddish, American
Yiddish diminutive of HERSH. As a non-Jewish American name (somewhat common around the end of the 19th century), it was likely inspired by the German surname HERSCHEL, borne for instance by the British astronomer William Herschel (1738-1822).
HOWARD   m   English
From an English surname which can derive from several different sources: the Anglo-Norman given name Huard, which was from the Germanic name HUGHARD; the Anglo-Scandinavian given name Haward, from the Old Norse name HÁVARÐR; or the Middle English term ewehirde meaning "ewe herder". This is the surname of a British noble family, members of which have held the title Duke of Norfolk from the 15th century to the present. A famous bearer of the given name was the American industrialist Howard Hughes (1905-1976).
HUDSON   m   English
From an English surname which meant "son of HUDDE". A famous bearer of the surname was the English explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611).
HUNTER   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
ILBERT   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name HILDEBERT.
INGRAM   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Norman French given name ENGUERRAND.
IRVIN   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of either IRVING or IRWIN.
IRVINE   m   English, Scottish
Variant of IRVING.
IRVING   m   English, Scottish, Jewish
From a Scottish surname which was in turn derived from a Scottish place name meaning "green water". Historically this name has been relatively common among Jews, who have used it as an American-sounding form of Hebrew names beginning with I such as Isaac, Israel and Isaiah. A famous bearer was the Russian-American songwriter and lyricist Irving Berlin (1888-1989), whose birth name was Israel Beilin.
IRWIN   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name EOFORWINE.
JACKSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of JACK". A famous bearer of the surname was American president Andrew Jackson (1767-1845).
JAMESON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of JAMES".
JAMISON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of JAMES".
JARRETT   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of GARRETT.
JARVIS   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name GERVAIS.
JEFFERSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of JEFFREY". It is usually given in honour of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), the third president of the United States and the primary author of the Declaration of Independence.
JEPSON   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which meant "son of JEP".
JERVIS   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of JARVIS.
JEWEL   f & m   English
In part from the English word jewel, a precious stone, derived from Old French jouel, which was possibly related to jeu "game". It is also in part from the surname Jewel or Jewell (a derivative of the Breton name JUDICAËL), which was sometimes used in honour of the 16th-century bishop of Salisbury John Jewel. It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
JEWELL   f & m   English
Variant of JEWEL.
JUDD   m   English, Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of JORDAN. Modern use of this name is inspired by the surname that was derived from the medieval name.
KEEFE   m   Irish, English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caoimh meaning "descendant of CAOMH".
KEEGAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname, the Anglicized form of the Gaelic Mac Aodhagáin, which means "descendant of Aodhagán". The given name Aodhagán is a double diminutive of AODH.
KEIGHLEY   f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from an English place name, ultimately meaning "clearing belonging to Cyhha". The Old English given name Cyhha is of unknown meaning. This name also serves as a variant of KAYLEE.
KEIR   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of KERR.
KEITH   m   English, Scottish
From a Scottish surname which was originally derived from a place name, itself probably derived from the Brythonic element cet meaning "wood". This was the surname of a long line of Scottish nobles. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
KELLY   m & f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).
KELSEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which is derived from town names in Lincolnshire. It may mean "Cenel's island", from the Old English name Cenel "fierce" in combination with eg "island".
KEMP   m   English (Rare)
From a surname derived from Middle English kempe meaning "champion, athlete, warrior".
KENDAL   m & f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was a variant of KENDALL.
KENDALL   m & f   English
From a surname which comes from the name of the city of Kendale in northwest England meaning "valley on the river Kent".
KENDRICK   m   English
From a surname which has several different origins. It could be from the Old English given names Cyneric "royal power" or Cenric "bold power", or from the Welsh name Cynwrig "chief hero". It can also be an Anglicized form of the Gaelic surname Mac Eanraig meaning "son of HENRY".
KENNARD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the Old English given names CYNEWEARD or CYNEHEARD.
KENNEDY   f & m   English, Irish
From an irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cinnéidigh meaning "descendant of CENNÉTIG". The name is often given in honour of assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963).
KERMIT   m   English
From a Manx surname, a variant of the Irish surname MacDermott meaning "son of DIARMAID". Theodore Roosevelt used it for one of his sons. The name is now associated with Kermit the Frog, one of the Muppets created by puppeteer Jim Henson.
KERR   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was derived from a place name meaning "rough wet ground" in Old Norse.
KIEFER   m   English (Modern)
From a German surname meaning either "pine tree" or "barrel maker".
KIMBALL   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from either the Welsh given name CYNBEL or the Old English given name CYNEBALD.
KINGSLEY   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "king's wood" in Old English.
KINGSTON   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "king's town" in Old English.
KINLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was an Anglicized form of Mac Fhionnlaigh meaning "son of FIONNLAGH".
KINSLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was derived from the given name CYNESIGE.
KYNASTON   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "CYNEFRIÐ's town" in Old English.
LACEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was a variant of LACY.
LACY   f & m   English
From a surname which was derived from Lassy, the name of a town in Normandy. The name of the town was Gaulish in origin, perhaps deriving from a personal name which was Latinized as Lascius.
LAMAR   m   English, African American
From a French and English surname, originally from a place name in Normandy, which was derived from Old French la mare meaning "the pool".
LANDON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from an Old English place name meaning "long hill" (effectively meaning "ridge"). Use of the name may have been inspired in part by the actor Michael Landon (1936-1991).
LANE   m   English
From a surname meaning "lane, path" which originally belonged to a person who lived near a lane.
LANGDON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of the surname LANDON.
LAWSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of LAURENCE (1)".
LAYTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "settlement with a leek garden" in Old English.
LEE   m & f   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War. In his honour, it has been commonly used as a given name in the American South.
LEIGH   f & m   English
From a surname which was a variant of LEE.
LEIGHTON   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of LAYTON.
LENNOX   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the name of a district in Scotland. The district, called Leamhnachd in Gaelic, possibly means "place of elms".
LENOX   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of LENNOX.
LESLEY   f & m   English
Variant of LESLIE.
LESLIE   f & m   English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from a Scottish place name, probably derived from Gaelic leas celyn meaning "garden of holly". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century. In America it was more common as a feminine name after the 1940s.
LEWIN   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the given name LEOFWINE.
LEYTON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of LAYTON.
LINCOLN   m   English
From a surname which was originally from the name of a city in England, derived from Brythonic lindo "lake, pool" and Latin colonia "colony". This name is usually given in honour of Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), president of the United States during the American Civil War.
LINDEN   m   English
From a German surname which was derived from linde meaning "lime tree".
LINDON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of LYNDON.
LINDSAY   f & m   English, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname which was originally derived from the name of the region Lindsey, which means "LINCOLN island" in Old English. As a given name it was typically masculine until the 1960s (in Britain) and 1970s (in America) when it became popular for girls, probably due to its similarity to Linda and because of American actress Lindsay Wagner (1949-).
LINTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally from place names meaning either "flax town" or "lime tree town" in Old English.
LINWOOD   m   English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "stream forest" in Old English.
LLOYD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Welsh llwyd meaning "grey". The composer Andrew Lloyd Webber (1948-) is a famous bearer of this name.
LOGAN   m & f   Scottish, English
From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow" in Scottish Gaelic.
LOVEL   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of LOWELL.
LOVELL   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of LOWELL.
LOWELL   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a Norman French nickname, from lou "wolf" and a diminutive suffix. The surname was borne by American poet and satirist James Russell Lowell (1819-1891).
LUTHER   m   English
From a German surname, itself from the Germanic given name LEUTHAR. The surname was borne by Martin Luther, a 16th-century monk and theologian, who started the Protestant Reformation by nailing his famous 95 theses to a church door. It has since been used as a given name in his honour, especially among Protestants. A notable bearer from the modern era was the American civil rights leader Martin Luther King (1929-1968).
LYNDON   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a place name meaning "lime tree hill" in Old English. A famous bearer was American president Lyndon B. Johnson (1908-1973).
LYNTON   m   English (Rare)
Variant of LINTON.
LYNWOOD   m   English
Variant of LINWOOD.
MACKENZIE   f & m   English
From the Gaelic surname Mac Coinnich, which means "son of COINNEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was William Lyon MacKenzie (1795-1861), a Canadian journalist and political rebel. As a feminine given name, it was popularized by the American actress Mackenzie Phillips (1959-).
MACY   f   English
From an English surname which was from various towns named Massy in France. The towns themselves were originally named from a Gallo-Roman personal name that was Latinized as Maccius. This is the name of a chain of American department stores founded by Rowland Hussey Macy (1822-1877).
MADDOX   m   English (Modern)
From a Welsh surname meaning "son of MADOC". It was brought to public attention when the actress Angelina Jolie gave this name to her adopted son in 2002.
MADISON   f & m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of MAUD". It was not commonly used as a feminine name until after the movie 'Splash' (1984), in which the main character adopted it as her name after seeing a street sign for Madison Avenue in New York City. A famous bearer of the surname was James Madison (1751-1836), one of the authors of the American constitution who later served as president.
MALONE   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Maoil Eoin meaning "descendant of a disciple of Saint JOHN".
MARION (2)   m   English
From a French surname which was derived from MARION (1). This was the real name of American actor John Wayne (1907-1979), who was born Marion Robert Morrison.
MARLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the Jamaican musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
MARLOWE   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "remnants of a lake" in Old English.
MARSHALL   m   English
From a surname which originally denoted a person who was a marshal. The word marshal originally derives from Germanic marah "horse" and scalc "servant".
MARVIN   m   English, German
Probably from an English surname which was derived from the given name MERVYN. A famous bearer was the American musician Marvin Gaye (1939-1984).
MASON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "stoneworker", from an Old French word of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").
MAXWELL   m   English
From a Scottish surname meaning "Mack's stream", from the name Mack, a short form of the Scandinavian name MAGNUS, combined with Old English wella "stream". A famous bearer of the surname was James Maxwell (1831-1879), a Scottish physicist who studied gases and electromagnetism.
MAYNARD   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name MEGINHARD.
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