Names with Relationship "from surname"

This is a list of names in which the relationship is from surname.
There are 462 names matching your criteria. This is page 2.

MILLARD   m   English
From an occupational English surname which meant "guardian of the mill" in Old English.
MILTON   m   English
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "mill town" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was John Milton (1608-1674), the poet who wrote 'Paradise Lost'.
MITCHELL   m   English
From a surname, itself derived from the given name MICHAEL.
MONET   f & m   Various
From a French surname which was derived from either HAMON or EDMOND. This was the surname of the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
MONROE   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname meaning "from the mouth of the Roe". The Roe is a river in Ireland. Two famous bearers of the surname were American president James Monroe (1758-1831) and American actress Marilyn Monroe (1926-1962).
MONTGOMERY   m   English
From an English surname meaning "GUMARICH's mountain" in Norman French. A notable bearer of this surname was Bernard Montgomery (1887-1976), a British army commander during World War II.
MORAY   m   Scottish
Variant of MURRAY.
MUNRO   m   Scottish
Variant of MONROE.
MUNROE   m   Scottish
Variant of MONROE.
MURPHY   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Murchadha meaning "descendant of MURCHADH".
MURRAY   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the region in Scotland called Moray, meaning "seaboard settlement".
NASH   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was derived from the Middle English phrase atten ash "at the ash tree". A famous bearer of the surname was the mathematician John Nash (1928-2015)... [more]
NELSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of NEIL". It was originally given in honour of the British admiral Lord Horatio Nelson (1758-1805)... [more]
NEWTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "new town" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English physicist Isaac Newton (1643-1727).
NILES   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name NEIL.
NOLAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Nualláin meaning "descendant of NUALLÁN". The baseball player Nolan Ryan (1947-) is a famous bearer of this name.
NORMAND   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the same source as the name NORMAN.
NORRIS   m   English
From an English surname, either NORRIS (1) or NORRIS (2).
NORTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "north town" in Old English.
NORWOOD   m   English
From a surname which was originally taken from a place name meaning "north wood" in Old English.
NOWELL   m   English (Rare)
From the surname Nowell (a variant of NOEL).
ORIOL   m   Catalan
From a Catalan surname meaning "golden". It has been used in honour of Joseph Oriol, a 17th-century saint.
ORMOND   m   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Ruaidh meaning "descendant of RUADH".
ORMONDE   m   English (Rare)
Variant of ORMOND.
OSBORNE   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of OSBORN.
OSBOURNE   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of OSBORN.
OTIS   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name Ode, a cognate of OTTO. In America it has been used in honour of the revolutionary James Otis (1725-1783).
PADEN   m   English (Rare)
An invented name, using the popular aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan... [more]
PAGE   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of PAIGE.
PAGET   f   English (Rare)
From a surname which meant "little page" (see PAIGE).
PAIGE   f   English
From an English surname meaning "servant, page" in Middle English. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδιον (paidion) meaning "little boy".
PALMER   m   English
From an English surname meaning "pilgrim". It is ultimately from Latin palma "palm tree", since pilgrims to the Holy Land often brought back palm fronds as proof of their journey.
PARKER   m & f   English
From an English occupational surname which meant "keeper of the park".
PARRIS   m & f   English (Rare)
From an English surname which originally denoted a person who came from the French city of Paris (see PARIS (2)).
PARRY   m   Welsh
From a Welsh surname which was derived from ap Harry meaning "son of HARRY".
PATTON   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from a diminutive of PATRICK. A notable bearer of the surname was the American World War II general George S. Patton (1885-1945), who played an important part in the allied offensive in France.
PAYTON   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of PEYTON.
PEARCE   m   English (Rare)
Variant of PIERCE.
PERRY   m   English
From a surname which is either English or Welsh in origin. It can be derived from Middle English perrie meaning "pear tree", or else from Welsh ap Herry, meaning "son of HERRY"... [more]
PEYTON   m & f   English
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "PÆGA's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress... [more]
PIERCE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name PIERS.
PIPER   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute). It was popularized as a given name by a character from the television series 'Charmed', which debuted in 1998.
PORTER   m   English
From an occupational English surname meaning "doorkeeper", ultimately from Old French porte "door", from Latin porta.
PRESLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest clearing" (Old English preost and leah). This surname was borne by musician Elvis Presley (1935-1977).
PRICE   m   Welsh
From a Welsh surname which was derived from ap Rhys meaning "son of RHYS".
PRYCE   m   Welsh
Variant of PRICE.
QUINCEY   m   English (Rare)
Variant of QUINCY.
QUINCY   m   English
From a surname which was derived (via the place name CUINCHY) from the given name QUINTUS... [more]
QUINN   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of CONN".
RADCLIFF   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "red cliff" in Old English.
RADCLYFFE   m   English (Rare)
From a surname, a variant of RADCLIFF.
RAFFERTY   m   English
From an Irish surname which was an Anglicized form of Ó Rabhartaigh meaning "descendant of Rabhartach". The given name Rabhartach means "flood tide".
RAMSAY   m   Scottish
Variant of RAMSEY.
RAMSEY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "wild-garlic island" in Old English.
RANDAL   m   English
Variant of RANDALL.
RANDALL   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name RANDEL.
RANDELL   m   English
Variant of RANDALL.
READ   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of REED.
REAGAN   f & m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ríagáin meaning "descendant of RIAGÁN"... [more]
REED   m   English
From an English surname which comes from multiple sources, including Old English read meaning "red" (originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion) and Old English ried meaning "clearing" (given to a person who lived in a clearing in the woods).
REID   m   English
From a surname which is a Scots variant of REED.
REILLY   m & f   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from the given name Raghailleach, meaning unknown.
RILEY   m & f   English
From a surname which comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.
ROOSEVELT   m   English
From a Dutch surname meaning "rose field". This name is often given in honour of American presidents Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) or Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945).
ROSCOE   m   English
From an English surname, originally derived from a place name, which meant "doe wood" in Old Norse.
ROSS   m   Scottish, English
From a Scottish and English surname which originally indicated a person from a place called Ross (such as the region of Ross in northern Scotland), derived from Gaelic ros meaning "promontory, headland"... [more]
ROWAN   m & f   Irish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
ROYCE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the medieval given name Royse, a variant of ROSE.
ROYSTON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally taken from an Old English place name meaning "town of Royse". The given name Royse was a medieval variant of ROSE.
RUSSEL   m   English
Variant of RUSSELL.
RUSSELL   m   English
From a surname which meant "little red one" in French. A notable bearer of the surname was the agnostic British philosopher Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), who wrote on many subjects including logic, epistemology and mathematics... [more]
RYAN   m   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendant of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).
SAMPSON (2)   m   English
From an English surname which was itself derived from a medieval form of the given name SAMSON.
SANDFORD   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of SANFORD.
SANFORD   m   English
From an English surname, originally from a place name, which meant "sand ford" in Old English.
SAWYER   m   English (Modern)
From a surname meaning "sawer of wood" in Middle English. Mark Twain used it for the hero in his novel 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876).
SCARLETT   f   English
From a surname which denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, ultimately derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrilat))... [more]
SCHUYLER   m   English
From a Dutch surname meaning "scholar". Dutch settlers brought the surname to America, where it was subsequently adopted as a given name in honour of the American general and senator Philip Schuyler (1733-1804).
SCOTT   m   English, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname which referred to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic. It is derived from Latin Scoti meaning "Gaelic speaker", with the ultimate origin uncertain.
SELBY   m & f   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "willow farm" in Old Norse.
SEWARD   m   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Old English given name SIGEWEARD.
SEYMOUR   m   English
From a Norman surname which originally belonged to a person coming from the French town of Saint Maur (which means "Saint MAURUS").
SHAW (1)   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from Old English sceaga meaning "thicket".
SHELBY   m & f   English
From a surname, which was possibly a variant of SELBY. Though previously in use as a rare masculine name, it was popularized as a feminine name by the main character in the movie 'The Woman in Red' (1935)... [more]
SIDNEY   m & f   English
From the English surname SIDNEY. It was first used as a given name in honour of executed politician Algernon Sidney (1622-1683)... [more]
SINCLAIR   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a Norman French town called "Saint CLAIR". A notable bearer was the American author Sinclair Lewis (1885-1951).
SLOAN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of SLOANE.
SLOANE   f   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from an Anglicized form of the given name SLUAGHADHÁN.
SMITH   m   English
From an English surname meaning "metal worker, blacksmith", derived from Old English smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world.
SPENCER   m   English
From a surname which meant "dispenser of provisions" in Middle English. A famous bearer was American actor Spencer Tracy (1900-1967). It was also the surname of Princess Diana (1961-1997).
STACEY   f & m   English
Variant of STACY.
STACY   f & m   English
Either a diminutive of ANASTASIA, or else from a surname which was derived from Stace, a medieval form of EUSTACE... [more]
STANFORD   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "stone ford" in Old English.
STANLEY   m   English
From a surname meaning "stone clearing" in Old English. A notable bearer of the surname was the British-American explorer and journalist Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904), the man who found David Livingstone in Africa... [more]
STERLING   m   English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from city of Stirling, which is itself of unknown meaning. The name can also be given in reference to the English word sterling meaning "excellent"... [more]
STEWART   m   English, Scottish
From a surname which was a variant STUART.
STIRLING   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant STERLING.
STUART   m   English, Scottish
From an occupational surname originally belonging to a person who was a steward. It is ultimately derived from Old English stig "house" and weard "guard"... [more]
SYDNEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was a variant of the surname SIDNEY. This is the name of the largest city in Australia, which was named for Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney in 1788... [more]
TANNER   m   English
From an English surname meaning "one who tans hides".
TATE   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Old English given name Tata, of unknown origin.
TAYLOR   m & f   English
From an English surname which originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by British author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985).
TEAGAN   m & f   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendant of Tadhgán". The given name Tadhgán is a diminutive of TADHG.
TENNYSON   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which meant "son of Tenney", Tenney being a medieval form of DENIS. A notable bearer of the surname was British poet Alfred Lord Tennyson (1809-1892).
TERRELL   m   English
From an English surname which was probably derived from the Norman French nickname tirel "to pull", referring to a stubborn person. It may sometimes be given in honour of civil rights activist Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954).
TERRY (1)   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval name Thierry, a Norman French form of THEODORIC.
THORBURN   m   English (Rare)
From a Scottish and English surname which was derived from the Norse name Þórbjörn (see TORBJÖRN).
THORLEY   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "thorn clearing" in Old English.
THORNTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "thorn town" in Old English.
THURSTAN   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the Norse name Þórsteinn (see TORSTEN).
TIERNEY   m & f   Irish, English (Rare)
Anglicized form of TIGHEARNACH. In part, it is from a surname derived from the given name.
TOBIN   m   English
From an English surname which was itself derived from the given name TOBIAS.
TOD   m   English
Variant of TODD.
TODD   m   English
From a surname meaning "fox", derived from Middle English todde.
TRACY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was taken from a Norman French place name meaning "domain belonging to THRACIUS". Charles Dickens used it for a male character in his novel 'The Pickwick Papers' (1837)... [more]
TRAVERS   m   English (Rare)
From the surname TRAVERS.
TRAVIS   m   English
From the English surname Travis (a variant of TRAVERS). It was used in America in honour of William Travis (1809-1836), the commander of the Texan forces at the Battle of the Alamo.
TRENT   m   English
From a surname which originally denoted someone who lived by the River Trent in England... [more]
TREVOR   m   Welsh, English
From a surname which was originally from a place name meaning "big village" from Welsh tref "village" and mawr "large".
TRUEMAN   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of TRUMAN.
TRUMAN   m   English
From a surname which meant "trusty man" in Middle English. A famous bearer of the surname was American president Harry S. Truman (1884-1972). It was also borne by American writer Truman Capote (1924-1984).
TUCKER   m   English (Modern)
From an occupational surname derived from Old English tucian meaning "one who fulls cloth".
TYLER   m   English
From an English surname meaning "tiler of roofs". The surname was borne by American president John Tyler (1790-1862).
TYRELL   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was a variant of TERRELL.
TYRRELL   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of TERRELL.
TYSON   m   English
From an English surname which could be derived from a nickname for a quarrelsome person, from Old French tison meaning "firebrand". Alternatively, it could be a variant of DYSON... [more]
UPTON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "upper town" in Old English. A famous bearer of this name was the American novelist Upton Sinclair (1878-1968).
VANCE   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Old English fenn meaning "marsh, fen".
VAUGHAN   m   Welsh
From a surname which was a variant of VAUGHN.
VAUGHN   m   Welsh, English
From a Welsh surname which was derived from Welsh bychan meaning "little".
VERNON   m   English
From a Norman surname which was from a French place name, ultimately derived from the Gaulish word vern meaning "alder".
WADE   m   English
From an English surname, either WADE (1) or WADE (2).
WALKER   m   English
From an English surname which referred to the medieval occupational of a walker, also known as a fuller. Walkers would tread on wet, unprocessed wool in order to clean and thicken it... [more]
WALLACE   m   English, Scottish
From a Scottish and English surname which originally meant "Welsh" or "foreigner" in Norman French. It was first used as given name in honour of Sir William Wallace, the Scottish hero who led a rebellion to expel the English invaders from Scotland in the 13th century.
WALLIS   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of WALLACE. Wallis Simpson (1895-1986) was the divorced woman whom Edward VIII married, which forced him to abdicate the British throne.
WALTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally taken from various Old English place names meaning "stream town", "wood town", or "wall town".
WARD   m   English
From an occupational surname for a watchman, derived from Old English weard "guard".
WARNER   m   English
From a Norman surname which was derived from the given name WERNER.
WARREN   m   English
From an English surname which was derived either from Norman French warrene meaning "animal enclosure", or else from the town of La Varenne in Normandy... [more]
WARRICK   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of WARWICK.
WARWICK   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the name of a town meaning "dam farm" (from Old English wer "weir, dam" and wic "dairy farm").
WASHINGTON   m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of a town in England (which meant "town belonging to Wassa's people"). The given name is usually given in honour of George Washington (1732-1799), commander of the Continental Army during the American Revolution and the first president of the United States.
WAYNE   m   English
From an occupational surname meaning "wagon maker", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". Use of it as a given name can be partly attributed to the popularity of the actor John Wayne (1907-1979)... [more]
WEBSTER   m   English
From an occupational surname meaning "weaver", derived from Old English webba.
WENDELL   m   English
From a surname which was derived from the given name WENDEL.
WESLEY   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.
WESTLEY   m   English
From a surname which was a variant of WESLEY.
WILBUR   m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from the nickname Wildbor meaning "wild boar" in Middle English. This name was borne by Wilbur Wright (1867-1912), one half of the Wright brothers, who together invented the first successful airplane... [more]
WILKIE   m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a diminutive of the given name WILLIAM.
WILLARD   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the Germanic given name WILLIHARD (or the Old English cognate Wilheard).
WILLIS   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Will, a diminutive of WILLIAM.
WILMER   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the given name WILMǢR.
WILSON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of WILLIAM". The surname was borne by Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), the American president during World War I.
WILTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning either "willow town" or "town on the River Wylye" in Old English. The river name is itself of Celtic origin, possibly meaning "tricky".
WINSLOW   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from an Old English place name meaning "hill belonging to WINE". A famous bearer of this name was American painter Winslow Homer (1836-1910).
WINTHROP   m   English
From a surname which was originally taken from a place name meaning "WINE's village" in Old English.
WINTON   m   English
From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "enclosure belonging to WINE" in Old English.
WRIGHT   m   English
From an occupational surname meaning "craftsman", ultimately from Old English wyrhta. Famous bearers of the surname were the Wright brothers (Wilbur 1867-1912 and Orville 1871-1948), the inventors of the first successful airplane, and Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), an American architect.
WYATT   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name WYOT. Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) was an American lawman and gunfighter involved in the famous shootout at the OK Corral.
WYNNE (2)   m   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was derived from the given name WINE.
YANCY   m   English
From a surname, which was an Americanized form of the Dutch surname Jansen meaning "JAN (1)'s son".
YORK   m   English
From a surname, which was derived from York, the name of a city in northern England. The city name was originally Eburacon, meaning "yew" in Brythonic, but it was altered by association with Old English Eoforwic, meaning "pig farm".


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