Names Categorized "bobs burgers characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include bobs burgers characters.
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ALmEnglish
Short form of ALBERT and other names beginning with Al. A notable bearer is American actor Al Pacino (1940-).
ANDYm & fEnglish
Diminutive of ANDREW or sometimes ANDREA (2). American pop artist and filmmaker Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was a famous bearer of this name.
BOBmEnglish, Dutch
Short form of ROBERT. It arose later than Dob, Hob and Nob, which were medieval rhyming nicknames of Robert. It was borne by the character Bob Cratchit in Charles Dickens' novel 'A Christmas Carol' (1843). Other famous bearers include American folk musician Bob Dylan (1941-) and Jamaican reggae musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
CALVINmEnglish
Derived from the French surname Cauvin, which was derived from chauve "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Cauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname was Latinized as Calvinus (based on Latin calvus "bald") and he is known as John Calvin in English. It has been used as a given name in his honour since the 19th century.
COURTNEYf & mEnglish
From an aristocratic English surname which was derived either from the French place name Courtenay (originally a derivative of the personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short") or else from a Norman nickname meaning "short nose". As a feminine name in America, it first became popular during the 1970s.
CYNTHIAfEnglish, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κυνθια (Kynthia) which means "woman from Kynthos". This was an epithet of the Greek moon goddess Artemis, given because Kynthos was the mountain on Delos on which she and her twin brother Apollo were born. It was not used as a given name until the Renaissance, and it did not become common in the English-speaking world until the 19th century.
DUNCANmScottish, English
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Donnchadh, derived from Gaelic donn "brown" and cath "battle". This was the name of two kings of Scotland, including the one who was featured in Shakespeare's play 'Macbeth' (1606).
EDITHfEnglish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch
From the Old English name Eadgyð, derived from the elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gyð "war". It was popular among Anglo-Saxon royalty, being borne for example by Saint Eadgyeth;, the daughter of King Edgar the Peaceful. The name remained common after the Norman conquest. It became rare after the 15th century, but was revived in the 19th century.
ETHANmEnglish, French, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name אֵיתָן ('Eitan) meaning "solid, enduring, firm". In the Old Testament this name is borne by a few minor characters, including the wise man Ethan the Ezrahite, supposedly the author of Psalm 89.... [more]
FELIXmGerman, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.... [more]
GAYLEf & mEnglish
Variant of GAIL or GALE (2).
GENEmEnglish
Short form of EUGENE.
GINGERfEnglish
From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of VIRGINIA, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.
GLORIAfEnglish, Spanish, Italian, German
Means "glory", from the Portuguese and Spanish titles of the Virgin Mary Maria da Glória and María de Gloria. Maria da Glória (1819-1853) was the daughter of the Brazilian emperor Pedro I, eventually becoming queen of Portugal as Maria II.... [more]
GRETCHENfGerman, English
German diminutive of MARGARETA.
HAROLDmEnglish
From the Old English name Hereweald, derived from the elements here "army" and weald "power, leader, ruler". The Old Norse cognate Haraldr was also common among Scandinavian settlers in England. This was the name of five kings of Norway and three kings of Denmark. It was also borne by two kings of England, both of whom were from mixed Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon backgrounds, including Harold II who lost the Battle of Hastings (and was killed in it), which led to the Norman conquest. After the conquest the name died out, but it was eventually revived in the 19th century.
HENRYmEnglish
From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".... [more]
HUGOmSpanish, Portuguese, English, Dutch, German, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.
JENfEnglish
Short form of JENNIFER.
JIMMYmEnglish
Diminutive of JAMES.
JOCELYNf & mEnglish, French
From a Germanic masculine name, variously written as Gaudelenus, Gautselin, Gauzlin, along with many other spellings. It was derived from the Germanic element Gaut, which was from the name of the Germanic tribe the Goths, combined with a Latin diminutive suffix. The Normans brought this name to England in the form Goscelin or Joscelin, and it was common until the 14th century. It was revived in the 20th century primarily as a feminine name, perhaps an adaptation of the surname Jocelyn (a medieval derivative of the given name). In France this is a masculine name only.
JONAS (2)mSwedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Biblical
From Ιωνας (Ionas), the Greek form of JONAH. This spelling is used in some English translations of the New Testament.
JOSHmEnglish
Short form of JOSHUA.
LINDAfEnglish, Dutch, German, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element lind meaning "flexible, soft, mild". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful".
LOGANm & fScottish, English
From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow" in Scottish Gaelic.
LOUISEfFrench, English, Danish, Swedish, Dutch, German
French feminine form of LOUIS.
MICKEYm & fEnglish
Diminutive or feminine form of MICHAEL. This was the name that Walt Disney gave to Ub Iwerks' cartoon character Mickey Mouse, who was originally named Mortimer Mouse. Another famous bearer was the American baseball player Mickey Mantle (1931-1995).
MILLIEfEnglish
Diminutive of MILDRED, MILLICENT and other names containing the same sound.
MORTmEnglish
Short form of MORTON or MORTIMER.
OLLIEm & fEnglish
Diminutive of OLIVER, OLIVIA or OLIVE.
PHILIPmEnglish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Biblical
From the Greek name Φιλιππος (Philippos) which means "friend of horses", composed of the elements φιλος (philos) "friend, lover" and ‘ιππος (hippos) "horse". This was the name of five kings of Macedon, including Philip II the father of Alexander the Great. The name appears in the New Testament belonging to two people who are regarded as saints. First, one of the twelve apostles, and second, an early figure in the Christian church known as Philip the Deacon.... [more]
REGGIEmEnglish
Diminutive of REGINALD.
RON (1)mEnglish
Short form of RONALD.
RUDOLPHmEnglish
English form of RUDOLF, imported from Germany in the 19th century. Robert L. May used it in 1939 for his Christmas character Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.
RUDYmEnglish
Diminutive of RUDOLF.
SALLYfEnglish
Diminutive of SARAH.
SASHAm & fRussian, Ukrainian, English, French
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of ALEKSANDR or ALEKSANDRA.
TAMMYfEnglish
Short form of TAMARA and other names beginning with Tam.
TEDDYmEnglish
Diminutive of EDWARD or THEODORE.
TINAfEnglish, Italian, Dutch, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian
Short form of CHRISTINA, MARTINA, and other names ending in tina. In addition to these names, it is also used in Dutch as a diminutive of CATHARINA and in Croatian as a diminutive of KATARINA.
TODDmEnglish
From a surname meaning "fox", derived from Middle English todde.
ZEKEmEnglish
Short form of EZEKIEL.