Names Categorized "celebrity babies"

This is a list of names in which the categories include celebrity babies.
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ADARA   f   Hebrew
Means "noble" in Hebrew.
ADÉLA   f   Czech
Czech form of ADELA.
ADEN   m   English (Modern)
Variant of AIDAN.
AISHA   f   Arabic, Urdu, American
Means "alive" in Arabic. This was the name of Muhammad's third wife, the daughter of Abu Bakr. Some time after Muhammad's death she went to war against Ali, the fourth caliph, but was defeated. This name is used more by Sunni Muslims and less by Shias.... [more]
ALBA (1)   f   Italian, Spanish, Catalan
This name is derived from two distinct names, ALBA (2) and ALBA (3), with distinct origins, Latin and Germanic. Over time these names have become confused with one another. To further complicate the matter, alba means "dawn" in Italian, Spanish and Catalan. This may be the main inspiration behind its use in Italy and Spain.
ALENA   f   German, Czech, Slovak, Slovene
Short form of MAGDALENA or HELENA.
AMALTHEA   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Αμαλθεια (Amaltheia), derived from μαλθασσω (malthasso) meaning "to soften, to soothe". In Greek myth she was a goat who nursed the infant Zeus.
AMELIE   f   German
German variant of AMELIA.
ANE (3)   f   Basque
Basque form of ANNA.
AVA (1)   f   English
Variant of EVE. A famous bearer was the American actress Ava Gardner (1922-1990).
AVERY   m & f   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
BAUTISTA   m   Spanish
Spanish form of BAPTISTE.
BENJAMÍN   m   Spanish, Czech, Slovak, Icelandic
Spanish, Czech, Slovak and Icelandic form of BENJAMIN.
BENJAMIN   m   English, French, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Biblical
From the Hebrew name בִּנְיָמִין (Binyamin) which means "son of the south" or "son of the right hand". Benjamin in the Old Testament is the twelfth and youngest son of Jacob and the founder of one of the southern tribes of the Hebrews. He was originally named בֶּן־אוֹנִי (Ben-'oniy) meaning "son of my sorrow" by his mother Rachel, who died shortly after childbirth, but it was later changed by his father (see Genesis 35:18).... [more]
BROOKLYN   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the borough of New York City, originally derived from Dutch Breukelen meaning "broken land". It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn.
CAIO   m   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of GAIUS.
CASH   m   English
From an English occupational surname for a box maker, derived from Norman French casse meaning "case". A famous bearer of the surname was American musician Johnny Cash (1932-2003).
CHARLENE   f   English
Feminine diminutive of CHARLES.
CHRISTOPHER   m   English
From the Late Greek name Χριστοφορος (Christophoros) meaning "bearing CHRIST", derived from Χριστος (Christos) combined with φερω (phero) "to bear, to carry". Early Christians used it as a metaphorical name, expressing that they carried Christ in their hearts. In the Middle Ages, literal interpretations of the name's etymology led to legends about a Saint Christopher who carried the young Jesus across a river. He has come to be regarded as the patron saint of travellers.... [more]
COCO   f   Various
Diminutive of names beginning with Co, influenced by the word cocoa. However, this was not the case for French fashion designer Coco Chanel (real name Gabrielle), whose nickname came from the name of a song she performed while working as a cabaret singer.
CRISTIANO   m   Italian, Portuguese
Italian and Portuguese form of CHRISTIAN. A famous bearer is Portuguese soccer player Cristiano Ronaldo (1985-).
CRUZ   f & m   Spanish, Portuguese
Means "cross" in Spanish or Portuguese, referring to the cross of the crucifixion.
DASHIELL   m   English (Rare)
In the case of American author Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961), it is an Anglicized form of his mother's surname De Chiel, which is of unknown meaning.
DAVI   m   Portuguese (Brazilian)
Portuguese form of DAVID.
DELFINA   f   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of DELPHINA.
DIMITRI   m   Russian, French
Variant of DMITRIY, using the Church Slavic spelling.
DINA (1)   f   English, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Variant of DINAH, and also the form used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament.
DUSTY   m & f   English
From a nickname originally given to people perceived as being dusty. It is also used a diminutive of DUSTIN. A famous bearer was British singer Dusty Springfield (1939-1999), who acquired her nickname as a child.
EMMA   f   English, French, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.... [more]
ENZO   m   Italian, French
The meaning of this name is uncertain. In some cases it seems to be an old Italian form of HEINZ, though in other cases it could be a variant of the Germanic name ANZO. In modern times it is also used as a short form of names ending in enzo, such as VINCENZO or LORENZO.
FIFI   f   French
Diminutive of JOSÉPHINE.
GAIA   f   Greek Mythology, Italian
From the Greek word γαια (gaia), a parallel form of γη (ge) meaning "earth". In Greek mythology Gaia was the mother goddess who presided over the earth. She was the mate of Uranus and the mother of the Titans and the Cyclopes.
GALA   f   Russian
Short form of GALINA.
GEORGIE   f & m   English
Diminutive of GEORGIA or GEORGE.
GRIER   m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of GREER.
HAL   m   English
Medieval diminutive of HARRY.
HARLOW   f & m   English
From a surname which was from a place name which was derived from Old English hær "rock" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
HARPER   f & m   English
From an Old English surname which originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.
HARUTO   m   Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "distant, remote" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (to), which refers to a Chinese constellation, or (to) meaning "soar, fly". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
HEAVEN   f   English (Modern)
From the English vocabulary word meaning "paradise".
IAGO   m   Welsh, Galician, Portuguese
Welsh and Galician form of JACOB. This was the name of two early Welsh kings of Gwynedd. It is also the name of the villain in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Othello' (1603).
INDIA   f   English
From the name of the country, which is itself derived from the name of the Indus River. The river's name is ultimately from Sanskrit सिन्धु (Sindhu) meaning "body of trembling water, river".
INDIANA   f & m   English
From the name of the American state, which means "land of the Indians". This is the name of the hero in the 'Indiana Jones' series of movies, starring Harrison Ford.
IRELAND   f   English (Modern)
From the name of the European island country, derived from Irish Gaelic Éire, which may mean something like "abundant land" in Old Irish.
ISLA   f   Scottish
Variant of ISLAY, typically used as a feminine name.
JADE   f   English, French
From the name of the precious stone that is often used in carvings. It is derived from Spanish (piedra de la) ijada meaning "(stone of the) flank", relating to the belief that jade could cure renal colic. As a given name, it came into general use during the 1970s.
JAMES   m   English, Biblical
English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.... [more]
JÚLIA   f   Portuguese, Catalan, Hungarian, Slovak
Portuguese, Catalan, Hungarian and Slovak form of JULIA.
KAI (1)   m   Frisian, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Frisian diminutive of GERHARD, NICOLAAS, CORNELIS or GAIUS.
KINGSTON   m   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "king's town" in Old English.
KIT   m & f   English
Diminutive of CHRISTOPHER or KATHERINE. A notable bearer was Kit Carson (1809-1868), an American frontiersman and explorer.
KNOX   m   English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from Old English cnocc "round hill".
LENNY   m   English
Diminutive of LEONARD.
LEO   m   German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LEON   m   English, German, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Dutch, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek λεων (leon) meaning "lion". During the Christian era this Greek name was merged with the Latin cognate Leo, with the result that the two forms are used somewhat interchangeably across European languages. In England during the Middle Ages this was a common name among Jews. A famous bearer was Leon Trotsky (1879-1940), a Russian Communist revolutionary.
LEXIE   f   English
Diminutive of ALEXANDRA.
LIA (1)   f   Italian, Portuguese, Georgian, Greek, Biblical Latin
Italian, Portuguese, Georgian and Greek form of LEAH.
LILLY   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
English variant of LILY. It is also used in Scandinavia, as a form of LILY or a diminutive of ELISABETH.
LOLA   f   Spanish, English
Diminutive of DOLORES.
LOUIS   m   French, English, Dutch
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.... [more]
LOURDES   f   Spanish
From the name of a French town. It became a popular center of pilgrimage after a young girl from the town had visions of the Virgin Mary in a nearby grotto.
LUCA (1)   m   Italian, Romanian, German
Italian and Romanian form of LUKE. This name was borne by Luca della Robbia, a Renaissance sculptor from Florence.
LUCAS   m   English, Dutch, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Biblical Latin
Latin form of Loukas (see LUKE).
LUNA   f   Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
LYNN   f & m   English
From an English surname which was derived from Welsh llyn "lake". Before the start of the 20th century it was primarily used for boys, but it has since come to be more common for girls. In some cases it may be thought of as a short form of LINDA or names that end in lyn or line.
MADDOX   m   English (Modern)
From a Welsh surname meaning "son of MADOC". It was brought to public attention when the actress Angelina Jolie gave this name to her adopted son in 2002.
MARCO   m   Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Italian form of MARK. During the Middle Ages this name was common in Venice, where Saint Mark was supposedly buried. A famous bearer was the Venetian explorer Marco Polo, who travelled across Asia to China in the 13th century.
MARIA   f & m   Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MASON   m   English
From an English surname meaning "stoneworker", from an Old French word of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").
MATEO   m   Spanish, Croatian
Spanish form of MATTHEW. This form is also sometimes used in Croatia, from the Italian form MATTEO.
MAXIMILIAN   m   German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Roman name Maximilianus, which was derived from MAXIMUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint and martyr. In the 15th century the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III gave this name to his son and eventual heir. In this case it was a blend of the names of the Roman generals Fabius Maximus and Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus (see EMILIANO), who Frederick admired. It was subsequently borne by a second Holy Roman Emperor, two kings of Bavaria, and a short-lived Habsburg emperor of Mexico.
MIA   f   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English
Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".
MILAN   m   Czech, Slovak, Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Dutch, Hungarian
From the Slavic element milu meaning "gracious, dear", originally a short form of names that began with that element. A city in Italy bears this name, though it originates from a different source.
MIRABELLA   f   Italian
Latinate form of MIRABELLE.
MOSES   m   English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name מֹשֶׁה (Mosheh) which is most likely derived from Egyptian mes meaning "son", but could also possibly mean "deliver" in Hebrew. The meaning suggested in the Old Testament of "drew out" from Hebrew משה (mashah) is probably an invented etymology (see Exodus 2:10). The biblical Moses was drawn out of the Nile by the pharaoh's daughter and adopted into the royal family, at a time when the Israelites were slaves in Egypt. With his brother Aaron he demanded the pharaoh release the Israelites, which was only done after God sent ten plagues upon Egypt. Moses led the people across the Red Sea and to Mount Sinai, where he received the Ten Commandments from God. After 40 years of wandering in the desert the people reached Canaan, the Promised Land, but Moses died just before entering it.... [more]
NAVA   f   Hebrew
Means "beautiful" in Hebrew.
NERIAH   m   Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Means "lamp of YAHWEH" in Hebrew. This is the name of the father of Baruch in the Old Testament.
NORA   f   Irish, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Italian
Short form of HONORA or ELEANOR. Henrik Ibsen used it for a character in his play 'A Doll's House' (1879).
OCEAN   m & f   English (Rare)
Simply from the English word ocean for a large body of water. It is ultimately derived from Greek Ωκεανος (Okeanos), the name of the body of water thought to surround the Earth.
PAOLO   m   Italian
Italian form of Paulus (see PAUL). Paolo Uccello and Paolo Veronese were both Italian Renaissance painters.
PAULINE   f   French, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French feminine form of Paulinus (see PAULINO).
PAX   f   Roman Mythology
Means "peace" in Latin. In Roman mythology this was the name of the goddess of peace.
PENELOPE   f   Greek Mythology, English
Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.
PHILIPPE   m   French
French form of PHILIP.
ROMAN   m   Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, German
From the Late Latin name Romanus which meant "Roman".
ROMEO   m   Italian
Italian form of the Late Latin name Romaeus meaning "a pilgrim to Rome". Romeo is best known as the lover of Juliet in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).
ROSE   f   English, French
Originally a Norman form of a Germanic name, which was composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
ROWAN   m & f   Irish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
RUI   m   Portuguese
Variant of RUY.
SASHA   m & f   Russian, Ukrainian, English, French
Russian and Ukrainian diminutive of ALEKSANDR or ALEKSANDRA.
SCOUT   f   English (Rare)
From the English word scout meaning "one who gathers information covertly", which is derived from Old French escouter "to listen". Harper Lee used this name in her novel 'To Kill a Mockingbird' (1960).
SERAPHINA   f   English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each. This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.
SERGIO   m   Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of SERGIUS.
SHILOH   m & f   Biblical
From an Old Testament place name possibly meaning "tranquil" in Hebrew. It is also used prophetically in the Old Testament to refer to a person, often understood to be the Messiah (see Genesis 49:10). This may in fact be a mistranslation. This name was brought to public attention after Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie gave it to their daughter in 2006.
SIERRA   f   English (Modern)
Means "mountain range" in Spanish, referring specifically to a mountain range with jagged peaks.
SUMMER   f   English
From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.
TALLULAH   f   English (Rare)
Popularly claimed to mean "leaping waters" in the Choctaw language, it may actually mean "town" in the Creek language. This is the name of waterfalls in Georgia. It was borne by American actress Tallulah Bankhead (1902-1968), who was named after her grandmother, who may have been named after the waterfalls.
VALENTINA   f   Italian, Russian, Croatian, Macedonian, Slovene, Romanian, Spanish, Greek, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Valentinus (see VALENTINE (1)). A famous bearer was the Soviet cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova (1937-), who in 1963 became the first woman to visit space.
VALERIA   f   Italian, Spanish, Romanian, German, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of VALERIUS. This was the name of a 2nd-century Roman saint and martyr.
VINCENT   m   English, French, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Slovak
From the Roman name Vincentius, which was from Latin vincere "to conquer". This name was popular among early Christians, and it was borne by many saints. As an English name, Vincent has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it did not become common until the 19th century. Famous bearers include the French priest Saint Vincent de Paul (1581-1660) and the post-impressionist painter Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890).
VIVIAN   m & f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Latin name Vivianus which was derived from Latin vivus "alive". Saint Vivian was a French bishop who provided protection during the Visigoth invasion of the 5th century. It has been occasionally used as an English (masculine) name since the Middle Ages. In modern times it is also used as a feminine name, in which case it is either an Anglicized form of BÉBINN or a variant of VIVIEN (2).
WAYLON   m   English
Variant of WAYLAND. This name was popularized by country music singer Waylon Jennings (1937-2002), who was originally named Wayland.
YANNIS   m   Greek
Variant transcription of GIANNIS.
YOUTA   m   Japanese
From Japanese (you) meaning "light, sun, male" and (ta) meaning "thick, big". Other character combinations are possible.
YUUNA   f   Japanese
From Japanese (yuu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" or (yuu) meaning "grapefruit, pomelo, citrus fruit" combined with (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" or (na), a phonetic character. Other combinations of kanji are also possible.
ZAHARA   f   Hebrew
Feminine form of ZOHAR.
ZAHRA   f   Arabic, Persian
Means "brilliant, bright" in Arabic. This is an epithet of the Prophet Muhammad's daughter Fatimah.
ZOWIE   f   English (Rare)
Variant of ZOE.
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