Names Categorized "invented"

This is a list of names in which the categories include invented.
Filter Results       more options...
AISLINGfIrish
Means "dream" or "vision" in Irish Gaelic. This name was created in the 20th century.
ALETHEAfEnglish
Derived from Greek αληθεια (aletheia) meaning "truth". This name was coined in the 16th century.
AVTANDILmGeorgian, Literature
Created by the Georgian poet Shota Rustaveli for his 12th-century epic 'The Knight in the Panther's Skin'. Rustaveli based it on Persian آفتاب (aftab) "sunshine" and دل (dil) "heart". In the poem Avtandil is a knight who is sent by Tinatin to search for the mysterious knight of the title.
BRAYLONmAfrican American (Modern)
An invented name, using the same sounds found in names such as Braden and Jalen.
CEDRICmEnglish
Invented by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel 'Ivanhoe' (1819). Apparently he based it on the actual name Cerdic, the name of the semi-legendary founder of the kingdom of Wessex in the 6th century. The meaning of Cerdic is uncertain, but it does not appear to be Old English in origin. It could be connected to the Brythonic name CARATACOS. The name was also used by Frances Hodgson Burnett for the main character in her novel 'Little Lord Fauntleroy' (1886).
DAENERYSfLiterature
Created by author George R. R. Martin for a character in his series 'A Song of Ice and Fire', first published 1996, and the television adaption 'Game of Thrones' (2011-). An explanation for the meaning of her name is not provided, though it is presumably intended to be of Valyrian origin. In the series Daenerys Targaryen is a queen of the Dothraki and a claimant to the throne of Westeros.
DAQUANmAfrican American (Modern)
Combination of the popular name elements Da and quan.
DEANDREmAfrican American
Combination of the popular name prefix De and ANDRE.
DEANGELOmAfrican American
Combination of the popular name prefix De and ANGELO.
DESHAWNmAfrican American
Combination of the popular name prefix De and SHAWN.
GLENDAfWelsh, English
A name created in the 20th century from the Welsh elements glân "pure, clean" and da "good".
GOTTHILFmGerman (Rare)
Derived from German Gott "God" and hilf "help". This name was created in the 17th century.
GOTTHOLDmGerman (Rare)
Derived from German Gott "God" and hold "lovely". This name was created in the 17th century.
HAIDEEfLiterature
Perhaps intended to derive from Greek αιδοιος (aidoios) "modest, reverent". This name was created by Byron for a character in his poem 'Don Juan' (1819).
JADENm & fEnglish (Modern)
An invented name, using the popular aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan. This name first became common in American in the 1990s when similar-sounding names were increasing in popularity. It is sometimes considered a variant of JADON.
JALENmAfrican American (Modern)
An invented name. In America it was popularized in the 1990s by basketball player Jalen Rose (1973-), whose name was a combination of those of his father James and maternal uncle Leonard.
JANICEfEnglish
Elaborated form of JANE, created by Paul Leicester Ford for his novel 'Janice Meredith' (1899).
JAQUANmAfrican American (Modern)
Combination of the popular name elements Ja and quan.
JARON (2)mEnglish (Modern)
Invented name, probably based on JARED and DARREN.
JAYLENm & fAfrican American (Modern), English (Modern)
Variant of JALEN. It can also be a feminine elaboration of JAY (1).
KESHAUNmAfrican American (Modern)
Combination of the popular name prefix Ke and SHAUN.
KESHAWNmAfrican American (Modern)
Combination of the popular name prefix Ke and SHAWN.
KHALEESIfLiterature
From a title used in the George R. R. Martin book series 'A Song of Ice and Fire' (first published 1996) and the television adaption 'Game of Thrones' (2011-). It is a feminine form of the Dothraki title khal meaning "warlord". In the series Daenerys Targaryen gains this title after she marries Khal Drogo.
LADONNAfAfrican American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name DONNA.
LAGINAfAfrican American (Rare)
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name GINA.
LASHAWNf & mAfrican American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name SHAWN.
LASHAYmAfrican American (Rare)
Combination of the popular name prefix La and SHAY (1).
LASHONDAfAfrican American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name SHONDA.
LATANYAfAfrican American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name TANYA.
LATASHAfAfrican American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name TASHA.
LATONYAfAfrican American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name TONYA.
LATOYAfAfrican American
Combination of the popular prefix La with the name TOYA.
LEBERECHTmGerman (Rare)
Means "live rightly" from German lebe "live" and recht "right". This name was created in the 17th century.
LEBRONmAfrican American (Rare)
Meaning unknown, probably an invented name. This is the name of basketball player LeBron James (1984-).
LESTATmLiterature
Name used by author Anne Rice for a character in her 'Vampire Chronicles' series of novels, first released in 1976, where it belongs to the French vampire Lestat de Lioncourt. Rice possibly intended the name to appear derived from Old French or Occitan l'estat "state, status", though apparently her husband's name Stan was inspiration.
LORNAfEnglish
Created by the author R. D. Blackmore for the title character in his novel 'Lorna Doone' (1869), set in southern England, which describes the dangerous love between John Ridd and Lorna Doone. Blackmore may have based the name on the Scottish place name Lorne or on the title 'Marquis of Lorne' (see LORNE).
LUCINDAfEnglish, Portuguese, Literature
An elaboration of LUCIA created by Cervantes for his novel 'Don Quixote' (1605). It was subsequently used by Molière in his play 'The Doctor in Spite of Himself' (1666).
MALVINAfScottish, English, Literature
Created by the poet James MacPherson in the 18th century for a character in his Ossian poems. He probably intended it to mean "smooth brow" in Gaelic.
MALVOLIOmLiterature
Means "ill will" in Italian. This name was invented by Shakespeare for a character in his play 'Twelfth Night' (1602).
MARQUITAfAfrican American
Feminine variant of MARQUIS.
MELBAfEnglish
From the surname of the Australian opera singer Nellie Melba (1861-1931). This was a stage name that she got from the name of the city Melbourne, where she was born.
MELINDAfEnglish, Hungarian
Combination of Mel (from names such as MELANIE or MELISSA) with the popular name suffix inda. It was created in the 18th century, and may have been inspired by the similar name Belinda. In Hungary, the name was popularized by the 1819 play 'Bánk Bán' by József Katona.
MIRANDAfEnglish, Dutch
Derived from Latin mirandus meaning "admirable, wonderful". The name was created by Shakespeare for the heroine in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), about a father and daughter stranded on an island. It did not become a common English given name until the 20th century. This is also the name of one of the moons of Uranus, named after the Shakespearian character.
NERISSAfLiterature
Created by Shakespeare for a character in his play 'The Merchant of Venice' (1596). He possibly took it from Greek Νηρεις (Nereis) meaning "nymph, sea sprite", ultimately derived from the name of the Greek sea god NEREUS, who supposedly fathered them.
NEVAEHfEnglish (Modern)
The word heaven spelled backwards. It became popular after the musician Sonny Sandoval from the rock group P.O.D. gave it to his daughter in 2000.
NIKEISHAfAfrican American (Rare)
Combination of the name prefix Ni and the name KEISHA.
NORMAfEnglish, Italian, Literature
Created by Felice Romani for the main character in the opera 'Norma' (1831). He may have based it on Latin norma "rule". This name is also frequently used as a feminine form of NORMAN.
ORNELLAfItalian
Created by the Italian author Gabriele d'Annunzio for his novel 'La Figlia di Jorio' (1904). It is derived from Tuscan Italian ornello meaning "flowering ash tree".
ORVILLEmEnglish
This name was invented by the 18th-century writer Fanny Burney, who perhaps intended it to mean "golden city" in French. Orville Wright (1871-1948), together with his brother Wilbur, invented the first successful airplane.
PADENmEnglish (Rare)
An invented name, using the popular aden suffix sound found in such names as Braden, Hayden and Aidan. It is sometimes considered a derivative of the surname PADDON.
PERDITAfLiterature
Derived from Latin perditus meaning "lost". Shakespeare created this name for the daughter of Hermione in his play 'The Winter's Tale' (1610).
RASHAWNmAfrican American (Modern)
Combination of the prefix Ra with the name SHAWN.
RONJAfSwedish
Invented by Swedish children's author Astrid Lindgren, who based it on the middle portion of Juronjaure, the name of a lake in Sweden. Lindgren used it in her book 'Ronia the Robber's Daughter' (Ronia is the English translation).
SHANIKAfAfrican American (Modern)
Combination of the popular name elements Shan and ka.
SHONDAfEnglish
Probably a blend of SHONA and RHONDA.
TAMEKAfEnglish
Variant of TAMIKA.
TAMIKAfEnglish
Variant of TAMIKO, inspired by the American jazz singer Tamiko Jones (1945-) or the American movie 'A Girl Named Tamiko' (1963).
TANIKAfAfrican American
Invented name, probably modeled on TAMIKA and influenced by TANYA.
TANIQUAfAfrican American (Rare)
Combination of the popular name element Tan (from names such as TANYA) and the common name suffix qua.
TANISHAfAfrican American
Combination of the popular name element Tan (from names such as TANYA) and the common name suffix sha.
TINATINfGeorgian, Literature
Possibly related to Georgian სინათლე (sinatle) "light". The name was devised by the Georgian poet Shota Rustaveli for his 12th-century epic poem 'The Knight in the Panther's Skin', in which Tinatin is the ruler of Arabia and the lover of Avtandil.
TYRESEmAfrican American (Modern)
An invented name based on the popular name syllable Tyr (from names such as TYRONE).
VANESSAfEnglish, Italian, Portuguese, German, Dutch
Invented by author Jonathan Swift for his poem 'Cadenus and Vanessa' (1726). He arrived at it by rearranging the initial syllables of the first name and surname of Esther Vanhomrigh, his close friend. Vanessa was later used as the name of a genus of butterfly. It was a rare given name until the mid-20th century, at which point it became fairly popular.
68 results