Names Categorized "megami tensei characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include megami tensei characters.
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ABADDON m Biblical
Means "ruin, destruction" in Hebrew. In Revelation in the New Testament this is another name of the angel of the abyss.
ABEL m English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name הֶבֶל (Hevel) meaning "breath". In the Old Testament he is the second son of Adam and Eve, murdered out of envy by his brother Cain. In England, this name came into use during the Middle Ages, and it was common during the Puritan era.
AGNES f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.
AI (1) f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection", (ai) meaning "indigo", or other kanji with the same pronunciation.
AIRI f Japanese
From Japanese (ai) meaning "love, affection" combined with (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "pear". Other combinations of kanji characters are possible.
AKANE f Japanese
From Japanese (akane) meaning "deep red, dye from the rubia plant". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name as well.
AKI (2) f Japanese
From Japanese (aki) meaning "clear, crystal", (aki) meaning "bright" or (aki) meaning "autumn". It can also come from (a) meaning "second, Asia" combined with (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji or combinations of kanji can form this name too.
AKIRA m & f Japanese
From Japanese (akira) meaning "bright", (akira) meaning "bright" or (akira) meaning "clear". Other kanji with the same pronunciation can also form this name. A famous bearer was the Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa (1910-1998), given name written .
ALEX m & f English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese, Italian, Romanian, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Hungarian, Czech, Russian
Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.
ALICE f English, French, Portuguese, Italian, Czech
From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).
AMATERASU f Far Eastern Mythology
Means "shining over heaven", from Japanese (ama) meaning "heaven, sky" and (terasu) meaning "shine". This was the name of the Japanese sun goddess, the ruler of the heavens. At one time the Japanese royal family claimed descent from her.
AMON m Egyptian Mythology (Anglicized)
From Αμμων (Ammon), the Greek form of Egyptian Ymn (reconstructed as Yamanu) meaning "the hidden one". In early Egyptian mythology he was a god of the air, creativity and fertility, who was particularly revered in Thebes. Later, during the Middle Kingdom, his attributes were combined with those of the god Ra and he was worshipped as the supreme solar deity Amon-Ra.
ANANTA m & f Hinduism
Means "infinite, endless" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form अनन्त / अनंत (an epithet of the Hindu god Vishnu) and the feminine form अनन्ता / अनंता (an epithet of the goddess Parvati).
ANAT (1) f Semitic Mythology
Possibly derived from a Semitic root meaning "water spring". Anat was a goddess of fertility, hunting and war worshipped by the Semitic peoples of the Levant. She was the sister and consort of the god Hadad.
ANDRAS m Welsh
Welsh variant of ANDREAS.
ANGEL m & f English, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus, which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger"). It has never been very common in the English-speaking world, where it is sometimes used as a feminine name in modern times.
ANN f English
English form of ANNE (1). In the English-speaking world, both this spelling and Anne have been used since the Middle Ages, though Ann became much more popular during the 19th century.
ANNA f English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary. In the English-speaking world, this form came into general use in the 18th century, joining Ann and Anne.... [more]
ANUBIS m Egyptian Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Ανουβις (Anoubis), the Greek form of Egyptian Inpw (reconstructed as Anapa) possibly meaning "royal child". Anubis was the Egyptian god who led the dead to the underworld. He was often depicted as a man with the head of a jackal.
ARES m Greek Mythology
Perhaps from either Greek αρη (are) "bane, ruin" or αρσην (arsen) "male". The name first appears as a-re in Mycenaean Greek writing. Ares was the bloodthirsty god of war in Greek mythology, a son of Zeus and Hera.
ARIADNE f Greek Mythology
Means "most holy", composed of the Cretan Greek elements αρι (ari) "most" and αδνος (adnos) "holy". In Greek mythology, Ariadne was the daughter of King Minos. She fell in love with Theseus and helped him to escape the Labyrinth and the Minotaur, but was later abandoned by him. Eventually she married the god Dionysus.
ARSÈNE m French
French form of ARSENIOS.
ARTEMISIA f Ancient Greek
Feminine form of ARTEMISIOS. This was the name of the 4th-century BC builder of the Mausoleum, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. She built it in memory of her husband, the Carian prince Mausolus.
ARTHUR m English, French, German, Dutch, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
The meaning of this name is unknown. It could be derived from the Celtic elements artos "bear" combined with viros "man" or rigos "king". Alternatively it could be related to an obscure Roman family name Artorius. Arthur is the name of the central character in Arthurian legend, a 6th-century king of the Britons who resisted Saxon invaders. He may or may not have been a real person. He first appears in Welsh poems and chronicles (some possibly as early as the 7th century) but his character was not developed until the chronicles of the 12th-century Geoffrey of Monmouth.... [more]
ASUKA f & m Japanese
From Japanese 明日 (asu) meaning "tomorrow" and (ka) meaning "fragrance", or from (asu) meaning "to fly" and (ka) meaning "bird". Other kanji combinations can be possible as well.
ATROPOS f Greek Mythology
Means "inevitable, inflexible" in Greek, derived from the negative prefix α (a) combined with τροπος (tropos) "direction, manner, fashion". Atropos was one of the three Fates or Μοιραι (Moirai) in Greek mythology. When her sister Lachesis decided that a person's life was at an end, Atropos would choose the manner of death and cut the person's life thread.
AYA (1) f Japanese
From Japanese (aya) meaning "colour", (aya) meaning "design", or other kanji characters with the same pronunciation.
AYANE f Japanese
From Japanese (aya) meaning "colour", (aya) meaning "design" or (aya) meaning "brilliant fabric design, kimono design" combined with (ne) meaning "sound". Other kanji combinations are possible.
BAAL m Semitic Mythology, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical
Variant spelling of BA'AL, and the form used in most translations of the Bible.
BARRY m Irish, English
Anglicized form of BAIRRE. It is also sometimes used as an Anglicized form of BERACH.
BEELZEBUB m Biblical, Biblical Latin
From Hebrew בַּעַל זְבוּב (Ba'al Zevuv) meaning "lord of flies", possibly intended as a mocking alteration of בַּעַל זבל (Ba'al Zevul) meaning "Ba'al of the exalted house", one of the Canaanite names for their god BA'AL.... [more]
BEL m Semitic Mythology
Akkadian cognate of BA'AL. The Babylonians used it as a title of the god Marduk.
BELIAL m Biblical, Biblical Latin, Judeo-Christian Legend
Means "worthless" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this term is used to refer to various wicked people. In the New Testament, Paul uses it as a name for Satan. In later Christian tradition Belial became an evil angel associated with lawlessness and lust.
BETH f English
Short form of ELIZABETH, or sometimes BETHANY.
CAESAR m Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen that possibly meant "hairy", from Latin caesaries "hair". Julius Caesar and his adopted son Julius Caesar Octavianus (commonly known as Augustus) were both rulers of the Roman Empire in the 1st century BC. Caesar was used as a title by the emperors that came after them.
CAIN m Biblical, Biblical Latin
Means "acquired" in Hebrew. In Genesis in the Old Testament Cain is the first son of Adam and Eve. He killed his brother Abel after God accepted Abel's offering of meat instead of his offering of plant-based foods. After this Cain was banished to be a wanderer.
CARMEN f Spanish, English, Italian, Romanian
Medieval Spanish form of CARMEL influenced by the Latin word carmen "song". This was the name of the main character in George Bizet's opera 'Carmen' (1875).
CASTOR m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Καστωρ (Kastor), possibly related to κεκασμαι (kekasmai) meaning "to excel, to shine" (pluperfect κεκαστο). Alternatively it could be derived from the Greek word καστωρ (kastor) meaning "beaver", though the legends about Castor do not mention beavers, which were foreign animals to the Greeks. In Greek myth Castor was a son of Zeus and the twin brother of Pollux. The constellation Gemini, which represents the two brothers, contains a star by this name.
CELESTINE f & m English
English form of CAELESTINUS. It is more commonly used as a feminine name, from the French feminine form Célestine.
CERBERUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Κερβερος (Kerberos), which possibly meant "spotted". In Greek myth this was the name of the three-headed dog that guarded the entrance to Hades.
CHARLIE m & f English
Diminutive or feminine form of CHARLES. A famous bearer is Charlie Brown, the main character in the comic strip 'Peanuts' by Charles Schulz.
CHARON m Greek Mythology
Possibly means "fierce brightness" in Greek. In Greek mythology Charon was the operator of the ferry that brought the newly dead over the River Acheron into Hades.
CHERNOBOG m Slavic Mythology
Means "the black god" from Slavic cherno "black" and bogu "god". Chernobog was the Slavic god of darkness, evil and grief.
CHIHIRO f & m Japanese
From Japanese (chi) meaning "thousand" and (hiro) meaning "search, seek", as well as other kanji combinations.
CORD m German
German contracted form of CONRAD.
CYBELE f Near Eastern Mythology (Latinized)
Meaning unknown, possibly from Phrygian roots meaning either "stone" or "hair". This was the name of the Phrygian mother goddess associated with fertility and nature. She was later worshipped by the Greeks and Romans.
DAGDA m Irish Mythology
Means "good god" in Celtic. In Irish myth Dagda (called also The Dagda) was the powerful god of the earth, knowledge, magic, abundance and treaties, a leader of the Tuatha De Danann. He was skilled in combat and healing and possessed a huge club, the handle of which could revive the dead.
DAICHI m Japanese
From Japanese (dai) meaning "big, great" combined with (chi) meaning "earth, land" or (chi) meaning "wisdom, intellect". Other kanji combinations are possible.
DAISUKE m Japanese
From Japanese (dai) meaning "big, great" and (suke) meaning "help". Other kanji combinations are possible.
DOLPH m English
Short form of ADOLPH.
ELIZABETH f English, Biblical
From Ελισαβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath", derived from the roots אֵל ('el) referring to the Hebrew God and שָׁבַע (shava') meaning "oath". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.... [more]
EREBUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Ερεβος (Erebos), which means "nether darkness". Erebus was the personification of the primordial darkness in Greek mythology.
FLYNN m English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Floinn meaning "descendant of FLANN".
FOX m English (Modern)
Either from the English word fox or the surname Fox, which originally given as a nickname. The surname was borne by George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the Quakers.
FRED m English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese
Short form of FREDERICK or other names containing the same element. A famous bearer was the American actor and dancer Fred Astaire (1899-1987).
GABBY m & f English
Diminutive of GABRIEL or GABRIELLE.
GABRIEL m French, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Catalan, English, Romanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name גַבְרִיאֵל (Gavri'el) meaning "God is my strong man", derived from גֶּבֶר (gever) meaning "strong man, hero" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Gabriel is an archangel in Hebrew tradition, often appearing as a messenger of God. In the Old Testament he is sent to interpret the visions of the prophet Daniel, while in the New Testament he serves as the announcer of the births of John to Zechariah and Jesus to Mary. According to Islamic tradition he was the angel who dictated the Quran to Muhammad.... [more]
GALE (2) m English
From an English surname that was derived from Middle English gaile "jovial".
GANESHA m Hinduism
Means "lord of hordes" from Sanskrit गण (gana) meaning "horde, multitude" and ईश (isha) meaning "lord, ruler". This is the name of the Hindu god of wisdom and good luck, the son of Shiva and Parvati. He is often depicted as a stout man with the head of an elephant.
GARRICK m English
From a surname that was originally derived from Occitan garric meaning "oak tree grove".
GORO m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 五郎 (see GOROU).
HANAKO f Japanese
From Japanese (hana) meaning "flower" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other kanji combinations.
HARLEY m & f English
From a surname that was derived from a place name, itself from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HARU m & f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
HECATE f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek ‘Εκατη (Hekate), possibly derived from ‘εκας (hekas) meaning "far off". In Greek mythology Hecate was a goddess associated with witchcraft, crossroads, tombs, demons and the underworld.
HERMES m Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Probably from Greek ‘ερμα (herma) meaning "cairn, pile of stones, boundary marker". Hermes was a Greek god associated with speed and good luck, who served as a messenger to Zeus and the other gods. He was also the patron of travellers, writers, athletes, merchants, thieves and orators.... [more]
HIKARI f & m Japanese
From Japanese (hikari) meaning "light". Other kanji can also form this name. It is often written with the hiragana writing system.
HIKARU m & f Japanese
From Japanese (hikaru) meaning "light" or (hikaru) meaning "brightness". Other kanji can also form this name.
HIROKO f Japanese
From Japanese (hiro) meaning "tolerant, generous", (hiro) meaning "abundant" or (hiro) meaning "prosperous" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HITOMI f Japanese
From Japanese (hitomi) meaning "pupil of the eye". It can also come from (hito) meaning "history" and (mi) meaning "beautiful", as well as other kanji combinations. This name is often written with the hiragana writing system.
HORUS m Egyptian Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of ‘Ωρος (Horos), the Greek form of Egyptian Hrw (reconstructed as Heru) possibly meaning "falcon" or "high". In Egyptian mythology Horus was the god of light, often depicted as a man with the head of a falcon. The son Osiris and Isis, he avenged his father's murder by killing Seth.
IGOR m Russian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Slovak, Czech, Italian, Portuguese
Russian form of Yngvarr (see INGVAR). The Varangians brought it to Russia in the 10th century. It was borne by two grand princes of Kiev. Famous bearers include Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971), a Russian composer whose most famous work is 'The Rite of Spring', and Igor Sikorsky (1889-1972), the Russian-American designer of the first successful helicopter.
IO f Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Greek mythology Io was a princess loved by Zeus, who changed her into a heifer in order to hide her from Hera. A moon of Jupiter bears this name in her honour.
ISAMU m Japanese
From Japanese (isamu) meaning "brave" or other kanji having the same pronunciation.
ISHTAR f Semitic Mythology
Meaning unknown. Ishtar was an Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian goddess who presided over love, war and fertility. She was cognate with the Canaanite and Phoenician Ashtoreth, and she was also identified with the Sumerian goddess Inanna.
ISIS f Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian Ist (reconstructed as Iset or Ueset), which possibly meant "the throne". In Egyptian mythology Isis was the goddess of the sky and nature, the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus. She was originally depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress, but in later times she was conflated with the goddess Hathor and depicted having the horns of a cow on her head. She was also worshipped by people outside of Egypt, such as the Greeks and Romans.
ISSACHAR m Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Possibly means "man of hire" or "there is reward", from Hebrew שָׁכַר (shakhar) meaning "hire, wage, reward". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve sons of Jacob and Leah and the founder of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. A justification for the name's meaning is given in Genesis 30:18.
ITSUKI m Japanese
From Japanese (itsuki) meaning "tree", using the kanji's nanori reading. Other kanji or kanji combinations can also form this name.
IZANAGI m Far Eastern Mythology
Means "male who invites" in Japanese. In Japanese mythology the god Izanagi was the husband of Izanami. When she died he unsuccessfully journeyed to the underworld to retrieve her. In the purifying rites that followed his return the gods of the sun, moon and wind were created.
IZANAMI f Far Eastern Mythology
Means "female who invites" in Japanese. In Japanese mythology she was a creator goddess, the wife of Izanagi. She died giving birth to Kagututi, the god of fire.
JACK m English
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as 'Jack and the Beanstalk', 'Little Jack Horner', and 'Jack Sprat'. American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).
JIMMU m Far Eastern Mythology
Means "divine warrior", from Japanese (jin) meaning "god" and (mu) meaning "military, martial". In Japanese legend this was the name of the founder of Japan and the first emperor, supposedly ruling in the 7th century BC.
JIN m & f Chinese
From Chinese (jīn) meaning "gold, metal, money", (jǐn) meaning "tapestry, brocade, embroidered" or (jīn) meaning "ferry". Other Chinese characters can form this name as well.
JOE m English
Short form of JOSEPH. Five famous sports figures who have had this name are boxers Joe Louis (1914-1981) and Joe Frazier (1944-), baseball player Joe DiMaggio (1914-1999), and football quarterbacks Joe Namath (1943-) and Joe Montana (1956-).
JONATHAN m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Biblical
From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan), contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan), meaning "YAHWEH has given", derived from the roots יְהוֹ (yeho) referring to the Hebrew God and נָתַן (natan) meaning "to give". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul. His relationship with his father was strained due to his close friendship with his father's rival David. Along with Saul he was killed in battle with the Philistines.... [more]
JUN (2) m & f Japanese
From Japanese (jun) meaning "pure", (jun) meaning "moisture", (jun) meaning "pure, clean, simple", or other kanji that are pronounced the same way.
JUNKO f Japanese
From Japanese (jun) meaning "obedience" or (jun) meaning "pure" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other combinations of kanji characters are also possible.
JUNO f Roman Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly related to an Indo-European root meaning "youth", or possibly of Etruscan origin. In Roman mythology Juno was the wife of Jupiter and the queen of the heavens. She was the protectress of marriage and women, and was also the goddess of finance.
JUSTINE f French, English, Dutch, German
French feminine form of Iustinus (see JUSTIN). This is the name of the heroine in the novel 'Justine' (1791) by the Marquis de Sade.
KALI f & m Hinduism, Bengali, Tamil
Means "the black one" in Sanskrit. The Hindu goddess Kali is the fierce destructive form of the wife of Shiva. She is usually depicted with black skin and four arms, holding a severed head and brandishing a sword. As a personal name, it is generally masculine in India.
KASUMI f Japanese
From Japanese (kasumi) meaning "mist". It can also come from (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" combined with (sumi) meaning "clear, pure". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
KEN (2) m Japanese
From Japanese (ken) meaning "healthy, strong" or other kanji that are pronounced the same way.
KENJI m Japanese
From Japanese (ken) meaning "healthy, strong" or (ken) meaning "study, sharpen" combined with (ji) meaning "two". This name can also be formed from other combinations of kanji characters.
KIYOSHI m Japanese
From Japanese (kiyoshi) or (kiyoshi) both meaning "pure". Other kanji or kanji combinations can also form this name.
KOTONE f Japanese
From Japanese (koto), which refers to a type of musical instrument similar to a harp, combined with (ne) meaning "sound". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
KRISHNA m Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali
Means "black, dark" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a Hindu god believed to be an incarnation of the god Vishnu. He was the youngest of King Vasudeva's eight children, six of whom were killed by King Kamsa because of a prophecy that a child of Vasudeva would kill Kamsa. Krishna however was saved and he eventually killed the king as well as performing many other great feats. In some Hindu traditions, Krishna is regarded as the supreme deity. He is usually depicted with blue skin.
KUMIKO f Japanese
From Japanese (ku) meaning "long time", (mi) meaning "beautiful" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
LACHESIS f Greek Mythology
Means "apportioner" in Greek. She was one of the three Fates or Μοιραι (Moirai) in Greek mythology. She was responsible for deciding how long each person had to live.
LAKSHMI f & m Hinduism, Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Tamil, Malayalam, Marathi, Hindi
Means "sign, mark" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the Hindu goddess of prosperity, good luck, and beauty. She is the wife of Vishnu and her symbol is the lotus flower, with which she is often depicted.
LAMIA (2) f Greek Mythology
Possibly from Greek λαιμος (laimos) "throat". In Greek mythology this is the name of a queen of Libya who was a mistress of Zeus. Hera, being jealous, kills Lamia's children, causing her to go mad and transform into a monster that hunts the children of others.
LEO m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman
Derived from Latin leo meaning "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.
LILITH f Semitic Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.
LINDE f Dutch
Dutch variant of LINDA.
LISA f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian
Short form of ELIZABETH, ELISABETH, ELISABET or ELISABETTA. This is the name of the subject of one of the world's most famous paintings, the 'Mona Lisa', the portrait of Lisa del Giocondo by Leonardo da Vinci.
LOKI m Norse Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from the Germanic root *luka meaning "knot, lock". In Norse legend Loki was a trickster god associated with magic and fire. Over time he became more and more evil, and he was eventually chained to a rock by the other gods.
LOUIS m French, English, Dutch
French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne. Others include Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (called the Sun King) who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe. It was also borne by kings of Germany (as Ludwig), Hungary (as Lajos), and other places.... [more]
LOUISA f English, German, Dutch
Latinate feminine form of LOUIS. A famous bearer was the American novelist Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888), the author of 'Little Women'.
LUCIA f Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman
Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus she is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.
LUCIFER m Judeo-Christian Legend
Means "bringing light", derived from Latin lux "light" and ferre "to bring". In Latin this name originally referred to the morning star, Venus, but later became associated with the chief angel who rebelled against God's rule in heaven (see Isaiah 14:12). In later literature, such as the 'Divine Comedy' (1321) by Dante and 'Paradise Lost' (1667) by John Milton, Lucifer became associated with Satan himself.
MAI (2) f Japanese
From Japanese (mai) meaning "dance" or 麻衣 (mai) meaning "linen robe". It can also come from (ma) meaning "real, genuine" combined with (ai) meaning "love, affection". Other kanji or kanji combinations can also form this name.
MAKOTO m & f Japanese
From Japanese (makoto) meaning "sincerity", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations.
MARGARET f English
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαριτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", probably ultimately a borrowing from Sanskrit मञ्यरी (manyari). Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.... [more]
MARGOT f French
French short form of MARGARET.
MARI (2) f Japanese
From Japanese (ma) meaning "real, genuine" combined with (ri) meaning "reason, logic" or (ri) meaning "village". Many other combinations of kanji characters can form this name.
MARIA f & m Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρια, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARIE f & m French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
French and Czech form of MARIA. A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.... [more]
MAYA (2) f English
Variant of MAIA (1). This name can also be given in reference to the Maya peoples, a Native American culture who built a great civilization in southern Mexico and Latin America.
MEDEA f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Georgian
From Greek Μηδεια (Medeia), possibly derived from μηδομαι (medomai) "to think, to plan". In Greek mythology Medea was a sorceress from Colchis (modern Georgia) who helped Jason gain the Golden Fleece. They were married, but eventually Jason left her for another woman. For revenge Medea slew Jason's new lover and also had her own children by Jason killed.
MESSIAH m Theology, English (Modern)
From the English word meaning "saviour", ultimately from Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ (mashiyach) meaning "anointed". The word appears in the Old Testament referring to a future king of the Jewish people. In the New Testament it is translated as Christ and is used as a title of Jesus.
METIS f Greek Mythology
Means "wisdom, skill, cunning" in Greek. In Greek mythology she was a Titan. Because it was prophesized that her children would be wiser than Zeus, he swallowed her after he had impregnated her. However, their daughter Athena eventually burst from his head fully grown.
MICHAEL m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament he is named as a protector of Israel. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies in the war against Satan, and is thus considered the patron saint of soldiers in Christianity.... [more]
MICHEL m French, German, Dutch
French form of MICHAEL. Michel de Notredame, also known as Nostradamus, was the 16th-century French astrologer who made predictions about future world events. This is also the German diminutive form of MICHAEL.
MIDORI f Japanese
From Japanese (midori) meaning "green", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations that have the same pronunciation.
MIKI f Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" and (ki) meaning "chronicle". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MINAKO f Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful", (na), a phonetic character, and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MINATO m & f Japanese (Rare)
From Japanese (minato) meaning "harbour", as well as other combinations of kanji having the same pronunciation.
MIRANDA f English, Dutch
Derived from Latin mirandus meaning "admirable, wonderful". The name was created by Shakespeare for the heroine in his play 'The Tempest' (1611), about a father and daughter stranded on an island. It did not become a common English given name until the 20th century. This is also the name of one of the moons of Uranus, named after the Shakespearean character.
MISAKI f Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful" and (saki) meaning "blossom". This name can be formed from other combinations of kanji as well.
MITSUKO f Japanese
From Japanese (mitsu) meaning "light" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
MOT m Semitic Mythology
Means "death" in Ugaritic. This was the name of the Ugaritic god of death and the lord of the netherworld. He was a son of the supreme god El.
NAGI m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic نجيّ (see NAJI).
NANAKO f Japanese
From Japanese (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" duplicated and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible as well.
NAOKI m Japanese
From Japanese (nao) meaning "straight" and (ki) meaning "tree", as well as other combinations of different kanji with the same pronunciations.
NATSUKI f Japanese
From Japanese (na) meaning "vegetables, greens" and (tsuki) meaning "moon". Alternatively, it can come from (natsu) meaning "summer" and (ki) meaning "hope". Other kanji combinations can form this name as well.
NEMESIS f Greek Mythology
Means "distribution of what is due, righteous anger" in Greek. In Greek mythology Nemesis was personification of vengeance and justice.
NORIKO f Japanese
From Japanese (nori) meaning "law, rule" or (nori) meaning "rule, ceremony" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are possible.
NYX f Greek Mythology
Means "night" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek goddess of the night, the daughter of Khaos and the wife of Erebos.
OBERON m Literature
Variant of AUBERON. Oberon was the king of the fairies in Shakespeare's comedy 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1595). A moon of Uranus bears this name in his honour.
ODIN m Norse Mythology, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of Old Norse Óðinn, which was derived from óðr "inspiration, rage, frenzy". It ultimately developed from the early Germanic *Woðanaz. The name appears as Woden in Anglo-Saxon sources (for example, as the founder of several royal lineages in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle) and in forms such as Wotan, Wuotan or Wodan in continental Europe. However, Odin is best known from Norse mythology, as the highest of the gods, presiding over art, war, wisdom and death. He resided in Valhalla, where warriors went after they were slain.
ORPHEUS m Greek Mythology
Perhaps related to Greek ορφνη (orphne) meaning "the darkness of night". In Greek mythology Orpheus was a poet and musician who went to the underworld to retrieve his dead wife Eurydice. He succeeded in charming Hades with his lyre, and he was allowed to lead his wife out of the underworld on the condition that he not look back at her until they reached the surface. Unfortunately, just before they arrived his love for her overcame his will and he glanced back at her, causing her to be drawn back to Hades.
PANDORA f Greek Mythology
Means "all gifts", derived from a combination of Greek παν (pan) "all" and δωρον (doron) "gift". In Greek mythology Pandora was the first mortal woman. Zeus gave her a jar containing all of the troubles and ills that mankind now knows, and told her not to open it. Unfortunately her curiosity got the best of her and she opened it, unleashing the evil spirits into the world.
PARVATI f Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Means "of the mountains" in Sanskrit. Parvati is a Hindu goddess of love and power, the wife of Shiva and the mother of Ganesha.
PHILEMON m Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Means "affectionate" in Greek, a derivative of φιλημα (philema) "kiss". Philemon was the recipient of one of Paul's epistles in the New Testament.
PHOENIX m & f English (Modern)
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird that appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years. The name of the bird was derived from Greek φοινιξ (phoinix) meaning "dark red".
PROMETHEUS m Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek προμηθεια (prometheia) meaning "foresight, forethought". In Greek myth he was the Titan who gave the knowledge of fire to mankind. For doing this he was punished by Zeus, who had him chained to a rock and caused an eagle to feast daily on his liver, which regenerated itself each night. Herakles eventually freed him.
PSYCHE f Greek Mythology
Means "the soul", derived from Greek ψυχω (psycho) "to breathe". The Greeks thought that the breath was the soul. In Greek mythology Psyche was a beautiful maiden who was beloved by Eros (or Cupid in Roman mythology). She is the subject of Keats's poem 'Ode to Psyche' (1819).
QUEEN f English
From an old nickname that was derived from the English word queen, ultimately from Old English cwen meaning "woman, wife".
QUETZALCOATL m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "feathered snake" in Nahuatl, derived from quetzalli "feather" and coatl "snake". In Aztec and other Mesoamerican mythology he was the god of the sky, wind, and knowledge, also associated with the morning star. According to one legend he created the humans of this age using the bones of humans from the previous age and adding his own blood.
RAPHAEL m German, English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
From the Hebrew name רָפָאֵל (Rafa'el) meaning "God heals", from the roots רָפָא (rafa') meaning "to heal" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". In Hebrew tradition Raphael is the name of an archangel. He appears in the Book of Tobit, in which he disguises himself as a man named Azarias and accompanies Tobias on his journey to Media, aiding him along the way. In the end he cures Tobias's father Tobit of his blindness. He is not mentioned in the New Testament, though tradition identifies him with the angel troubling the water in John 5:4.... [more]
REI f Japanese
From Japanese (rei) meaning "bell", (rei) meaning "beautiful, lovely" or (rei) meaning "the tinkling of jade". This name can also be formed by other kanji with the same pronunciation.
REN m & f Japanese
From Japanese (ren) meaning "lotus", (ren) meaning "love", or other kanji that are pronounced the same way.
RIN f & m Japanese
From Japanese (rin) meaning "dignified, severe, cold" or other kanji that are pronounced the same way.
RIO (2) f Japanese
From Japanese (ri) meaning "white jasmine" or (ri) meaning "village" combined with (o) meaning "center", (o) meaning "thread" or (o) meaning "cherry blossom". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
ROBIN m & f English, Dutch, Swedish
Medieval diminutive of ROBERT. Robin Hood was a legendary hero and archer of medieval England who stole from the rich to give to the poor. In modern times it has also been used as a feminine name, and it may sometimes be given in reference to the red-breasted bird.
ROLAND m English, French, German, Swedish, Dutch, Hungarian, Medieval French
From the Germanic elements hrod meaning "fame" and landa meaning "land", though some theories hold that the second element was originally nand meaning "brave". Roland was a semi-legendary French hero whose story is told in the medieval epic 'La Chanson de Roland', in which he is a nephew of Charlemagne killed in battle with the Saracens. The Normans introduced this name to England.
RONALDO m Portuguese
Portuguese form of RONALD. A notable bearer is the retired Brazilian soccer player Ronaldo Luís Nazário de Lima (1976-), who is commonly known only by his first name.
SAKI f Japanese
From Japanese (sa) meaning "blossom" and (ki) meaning "hope", besides other combinations of kanji characters.
SAKURAKO f Japanese
From Japanese (sakura) meaning "cherry blossom" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are also possible.
SAORI f Japanese
From Japanese (sa) meaning "sand" or (sa) meaning "already, now" combined with (ori) meaning "weaving". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
SATAN m Theology, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Derived from Hebrew שָׂטָן (satan) meaning "adversary". This is the Hebrew name of the enemy of the Judeo-Christian god. In the New Testament he is also known by the title Devil (Diabolos in Greek).
SATI f Hinduism
Means "truthful" in Sanskrit. In Hindu belief this was the name of a goddess, a wife of Shiva. After her death she was reborn as the goddess Parvati.
SERA f English (Rare)
Either a variant of SARAH or a short form of SERAPHINA.
SETH (2) m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
From Σεθ (Seth), the Greek form of Egyptian Swtkh (reconstructed as Sutekh), which possibly means "pillar" or "dazzle". Seth was the Egyptian god of chaos and the desert, the slayer of Osiris. Osiris's son Horus eventually defeats Seth and has him banished to the desert.
SETSUKO f Japanese
From Japanese (setsu) meaning "section, period, verse, melody" and (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations can also be possible.
SHIVA (1) m Hinduism, Indian, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali
Derived from Sanskrit शिव (shiva) meaning "benign, kind, auspicious". Shiva is the Hindu god of destruction and restoration, the husband of the mother goddess Parvati. His aspect is usually terrifying, but it can also be gentle.
SHO m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji or (see SHOU).
SHOUHEI m Japanese
From Japanese (shou) meaning "soar, glide" and (hei) meaning "level, even, peaceful", in addition to other combinations of kanji that are pronounced the same way.
SID m English
Short form of SIDNEY.
SIEGFRIED m German, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Germanic elements sigu "victory" and frid "peace". Siegfried was a hero from Germanic legend, chief character in the 'Nibelungenlied'. He secretly helped the Burgundian king Günther overcome the challenges set out by the Icelandic queen Brünhild so that Günther might win her hand. In exchange, Günther consented to the marriage of Siegfried and his sister Kriemhild. Years later, after a dispute between Brünhild and Kriemhild, Siegfried was murdered by Hagen with Günther's consent. He was stabbed in his one vulnerable spot on the small of his back, which had been covered by a leaf while he bathed in dragon's blood. His adventures were largely based on those of the Norse hero Sigurd. The story was later adapted by Richard Wagner to form part of his opera 'The Ring of the Nibelung' (1876).
SOPHIA f English, Greek, German, Ancient Greek
Means "wisdom" in Greek. This was the name of an early, probably mythical, saint who died of grief after her three daughters were martyred during the reign of the emperor Hadrian. Legends about her probably arose as a result of a medieval misunderstanding of the phrase Hagia Sophia "Holy Wisdom", which is the name of a large basilica in Constantinople.... [more]
SRAOSHA m Persian Mythology
Ancient Avestan form of SAROSH.
STEPHEN m English, Biblical
From the Greek name Στεφανος (Stephanos) meaning "crown", more precisely "that which surrounds". Saint Stephen was a deacon who was stoned to death, as told in Acts in the New Testament. He is regarded as the first Christian martyr. Due to him, the name became common in the Christian world. It was popularized in England by the Normans.... [more]
STEVEN m English, Dutch
Medieval English variant of STEPHEN, and a Dutch variant of STEFAN. The filmmaker Steven Spielberg (1946-), director of 'E.T.' and 'Indiana Jones', is a famous bearer of this name.
TARO m Japanese
Alternate transcription of Japanese Kanji 太郎 (see TAROU).
THANATOS m Greek Mythology
Means "death" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek god of death who resided with Hades in the underworld.
THEODORE m English
From the Greek name Θεοδωρος (Theodoros), which meant "gift of god" from Greek θεος (theos) "god" and δωρον (doron) "gift". The name Dorothea is derived from the same roots in reverse order. This was the name of several saints, including Theodore of Amasea, a 4th-century Greek soldier; Theodore of Tarsus, a 7th-century archbishop of Canterbury; and Theodore the Studite, a 9th-century Byzantine monk. It was also borne by two popes.... [more]
THOR m Norse Mythology, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
From the Old Norse Þórr meaning "thunder", ultimately from the early Germanic *Þunraz. Thor was the Norse god of strength, thunder, war and storms, the son of Odin. He was armed with a hammer called Mjolnir, and wore an enchanted belt that doubled his strength.
THOTH m Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian Djhwty (reconstructed as Djehuti), which is of uncertain meaning. In Egyptian mythology Thoth was the god of the moon, science, magic, speech and writing. He was often depicted as a man with the head of an ibis.
TITANIA f Literature
Perhaps based on Latin Titanius meaning "of the Titans". This name was (first?) used by Shakespeare in his comedy 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (1595) where it is the name of the queen of the fairies. This is also a moon of Uranus, named after the Shakespearean character.
TOMOMI f & m Japanese
From Japanese (tomo) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (tomo) meaning "friend" combined with (mi) meaning "beautiful" or (mi) meaning "fruit, good result, truth". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
TSUBASA m & f Japanese
From Japanese (tsubasa) meaning "wing", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations with the same pronunciation.
URIEL m Biblical, Hebrew
From the Hebrew name אוּרִיאֵל ('Uri'el) meaning "God is my light", from אוּר ('ur) meaning "light, flame" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". Uriel is an archangel in Hebrew tradition. He is mentioned only in the Apocrypha, for example in the Book of Enoch where he warns Noah of the coming flood.
VALKYRIE f Various
Means "chooser of the slain", derived from Old Norse valr "the slain" and kyrja "chooser". In Norse myth the Valkyries were maidens who led heroes killed in battle to Valhalla.
VISHNU m Hinduism, Indian, Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil, Hindi, Marathi
Probably means "all-pervasive" in Sanskrit. The Hindu god Vishnu is the protector and preserver of the universe, usually depicted as four-armed and blue-skinned. By some Hindus he is regarded as the supreme god.
WALTER m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Italian, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote 'Ivanhoe' and other notable works.
WILLIAM m English
From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England in the 11th century. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.... [more]
YUKIKO f Japanese
From Japanese (yuki) meaning "happiness" or (yuki) meaning "snow" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Alternatively, it can come from (yu) meaning "reason, cause" with (ki) meaning "joy" or (ki) meaning "valuable" combined with (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations can also form this name.
YUKO f Japanese
From Japanese (yu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" and (ko) meaning "child", as well as other combinations of kanji.
YUMI f Japanese
From Japanese (yumi) meaning "archery bow". It can also come from (yu) meaning "reason, cause", (yu) meaning "friend" or a nanori reading of (yu) meaning "archery bow" combined with (mi) meaning "beautiful". Other kanji or kanji combinations are also possible.
YUU m & f Japanese
From Japanese (yuu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness", (yuu) meaning "distant, leisurely", (yuu) meaning "brave", or other kanji that are pronounced the same way.
YUUKI m & f Japanese
From Japanese (yuu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" or (yuu) meaning "distant, leisurely" combined with (ki) meaning "hope", (ki) meaning "brightness" or (ki) meaning "living". Other combinations of kanji can form this name as well.
YUUTA m Japanese
From Japanese (yuu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness", (yuu) meaning "distant, leisurely" or (yuu) meaning "brave" combined with (ta) meaning "thick, big". Other combinations of kanji are possible.
ZORA f Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From a South and West Slavic word meaning "dawn, aurora".