Names Categorized "moon"

This is a list of names in which the categories include moon.
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AJLA   f   Bosnian
Bosnian form of AYLA (2).
ARIANRHOD   f   Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Possibly means "silver wheel" or "round wheel" in Welsh. In Welsh myth Arianrhod was the mother of the brothers Dylan and Lleu Llaw Gyffes. In earlier myths she was a goddess of the moon.
ARTEMIS   f   Greek Mythology, Greek
Meaning unknown, possibly related either to Greek αρτεμης (artemes) "safe" or αρταμος (artamos) "a butcher". Artemis was the Greek goddess of the moon and hunting, the twin of Apollo and the daughter of Zeus and Leto. She was known as Diana to the Romans.
AYLA (2)   f   Turkish
Means "moonlight, halo" in Turkish.
AYLİN   f   Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "moon halo" in Turkish and Azerbaijani.
AYNUR   f   Turkish, Azerbaijani, Uyghur
Means "moon light" in Turkish, Azerbaijani and Uyghur.
AYSU   f   Turkish
Derived from Turkish ay "moon" and su "water".
CHANDRA   m & f   Hinduism, Bengali, Indian, Assamese, Hindi, Marathi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Nepali
Means "moon" in Sanskrit, derived from चन्द (chand) meaning "to shine". This is a transcription of the masculine form चण्ड (a name of the moon in Hindu texts which is often personified as a deity) as well as the feminine form चण्डा.
CHANTREA   f   Khmer
Means "moonlight" in Khmer.
DIANA   f   English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Roman Mythology
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.... [more]
HELEN   f   English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene), probably from Greek ‘ελενη (helene) "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σεληνη (selene) "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.... [more]
LUNA   f   Roman Mythology, Italian, Spanish, English
Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.
LUSINE   f   Armenian
Means "moon" in Armenian.
MARAMA   f   Polynesian Mythology
Means "moon" in Maori. In Maori and other Polynesian mythology she was the goddess of the moon and death.
NANNA (2)   m   Near Eastern Mythology
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the Sumerian god of the moon. He was the son of Enlil and the husband of Ningal.
PHOEBE   f   English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).
PURNIMA   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Tamil, Kannada
Means "full moon" in Sanskrit.
RAMACHANDRA   m   Hinduism, Indian, Kannada, Telugu
Derived from the name of the Hindu god RAMA (1) combined with Sanskrit चन्द्र (chandra) meaning "moon". This is another name of Rama.
SELENE   f   Greek Mythology, Greek
Means "moon" in Greek. This was the name of a Greek goddess of the moon, sometimes identified with the goddess Artemis.
TANITH   f   Near Eastern Mythology
Derived from Semitic roots meaning "serpent lady". This was the name of the Phoenician goddess of love, fertility, the moon and the stars.
THOTH   m   Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek form of Egyptian Djhwty (reconstructed as Djehuti), which is of uncertain meaning. In Egyptian mythology Thoth was the god of the moon, science, magic, speech and writing. He was often depicted as a man with the head of an ibis.
USAGI   f   Popular Culture
Means "rabbit" in Japanese. This name was used on the Japanese television show 'Sailor Moon'.
22 results